Faculty Profile: Joel Federman

Photograph of JoelFederman
Joel Federman

School: Psychology and Interdisciplinary Inquiry

Bio:

Joel Federman, Ph.D., is a writer, teacher and activist. He is Director of Saybrook's Transformative Social Change Specialization, within the School of Psychology and Interdisciplinary Inquiry. He has a doctorate in political philosophy from the University of Southern California, and currently lives in San Francisco.

Dr. Federman is currently working on a case study of civil society activism toward democratic reform in Egypt. To further this research, he traveled to Egypt in August 2011, and met with democracy activists and others.

More broadly, Dr. Federman's teaching and writing focuses on helping people to reenvision their individual and collective potential, to see themselves shaping a better world. He is particularly interested in global-level social change, especially the development of global civil society efforts aimed at realizing values such as universal compassion, social justice and peace. He is writing a book on those themes, to be titled The Politics of Universal Compassion. He is also interested in exploring ways that new communication technologies can be used in the service of transformative social change.

He edits a website on the topics of peace, social justice, universal compassion, diversity, and ecology, at www.topia.net, with a Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/topia.net. He also has done research and writing in the related areas of violence prevention, media violence, diversity education, and cross-cultural conflict resolution.

During the Fall 2014 semester, Dr. Federman is teaching TSC 6510 CO Theory and Practice of Nonviolence, TSC 6610 CO Social System Transformation Theory, TSC 6590 Peace Studies, TSC 7079 CO Building Sustainability: Present Practices in Communities and Society, RES 1015 CO Methods of Research & Disciplined Inquiry II, and is also a member and/or chair of several dissertation, thesis, project, and essay committees.

A former Co-Director of the Center for Communication and Social Policy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Dr. Federman was project director for the National Television Violence Study. For that three-year effort (1995-98), he coordinated a team of more than 200 individuals at four major research universities -- the Universities of California, North Carolina, Texas and Wisconsin -- to produce the most comprehensive study of television violence to date.

Dr. Federman was also project director and co-author of the Choices and Consequences Evaluation, a study of a middle school violence prevention curriculum developed by Court TV, the National Middle School Association, and Time Warner Cable. In 1998, he initiated the Center's Civility Clearinghouse, a web-based resource for information regarding the topic of civility. He is the author of Empowering Diversity, a curriculum for middle school students commissioned by the Santa Barbara, California Board of Education.

Dr. Federman has led numerous cross-cultural conflict resolution workshops, including a year-long Palestinian-Jewish dialogue at the University of Southern California. He is a former member of the board of directors of the Peace and Justice Studies Association, a national consortium of university-based peace and conflict studies programs.

His writing has been published in the Los Angeles Times; the Encyclopedia of Communication and Information; Tikkun Magazine; Common Dreams; the Yearbook of the UNESCO International Clearinghouse on Children and Violence on the Screen; Alternet; Campaigns and Elections; and Humanities in Society."


Twitter: @JoelFederman
Academia.edu: http://saybrook.academia.edu/JoelFederman

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Curriculum Vitae

Degrees, Discipline, Year, Institution

Ph.D., Political Science, 1999, University of Southern California

M.A., Political Science, 1982, University of Southern California

B.A., Political Science, 1979, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Current Projects and Professional Activities

I am Director of Saybrook's Transformative Social Change Specialization, within the School of Psychology and Interdisciplinary Inquiry.
 

During the Fall 2014 semester, I am teaching TSC 6510 CO Theory and Practice of Nonviolence, TSC 6610 CO Social System Transformation Theory, TSC 6590 Peace Studies, TSC 7079 CO Building Sustainability: Present Practices in Communities and Society, RES 1015 CO Methods of Research & Disciplined Inquiry II,, and also am a member and/or chair of several dissertation, thesis and essay committees.
 

I am currently working on a case study of civil society activism toward democratic reform in Egypt.  To further this research, I traveled to Egypt in August 2011, and met with democracy activists and others.

 

I edit a website on the topics of peace, social justice, universal compassion, and globalization, at www.topia.net, with a Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/topia.net. I also have a growing interest in exploring ways that new communication technologies can be used in the service of transformative social change.

 

I am currently writing a book, entitled “The Politics of Universal Compassion,” a treatise on universal compassion as a political and social philosophy that can be a “third way” to modern authoritarianism and post-modern relativism. The book explores such issues as: are people capable of universal compassion; what are the political implications of universal compassion; what are the beliefs about society that limit people from actively pursuing universal compassion.

Current Publications

Federman, J. (2011, August 15) The world should be watching Tahrir Square. Common Dreams. Retrieved from http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/08/15-0

 

Federman, J. (2007, July/August). A movement of movements: First US social forum a historic event [Online]. Tikkun Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.tikkun.org/article.php?story=socialforum

 

Federman, J. (2004, Feb. 16). The great Valentine wedding party. Retrieved from http://www.alternet.org/story/17861

 

Federman, J., & Cantor, J. (2002). Ratings for movies. In J. R. Schement (Ed.), Macmillan Encyclopedia of Communication and Information (Vol 3, pp. 833-836). New York: Macmillan Reference.

 

Federman, J. (2002). Time for an idealism outburst. The Peace Chronicle (The Newsletter of the Peace and Justice Studies Association), 1(4), 13.

 

Federman, J. (2002). Rating sex and violence in the media: Media ratings and proposals for reform. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.kff.org/entmedia/loader.cfm?url=/commonspot/security/getfile....

 

Federman, J. (2001). Why is diversity education important? COPRED Peace Chronicle (The Consortium on Peace Research, Education and Development), 25 Volume 25(4), 8-9.

 

Federman, J. (1999). The politics of compassion (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

 

Wilson, B. J., Linz, D., Federman, J., Smith, S., Bryant, P., Nathanson, A., …Lingsweiler, R. (1999). The choices and consequences evaluation: A study of court TV's anti-violence curriculum. Santa Barbara: University of California. Retreived from http://www.saybrook.edu/sites/default/files/faculty/choices_consequences...

 

Federman, J. (1998). Media rating systems: A comparative review. In Monroe E. Price (Ed.), The V-chip debate: Content filtering from television to the internet (pp. 99-132). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Significant Publications

Federman, J. (2007, July/August). A movement of movements: First US social forum a historic event [Online]. Tikkun Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.tikkun.org/article.php?story=socialforum

 

Federman, J. (2002). Rating sex and violence in the media: Media ratings and proposals for reform. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.kff.org/entmedia/loader.cfm?url=/commonspot/security/getfile....

 

Federman, J. (2001). Why is diversity education important? COPRED Peace Chronicle (The Consortium on Peace Research, Education and Development), 25 Volume 25(4), 8-9. Retrieved from http://www.peacejusticestudies.org/documents/summer2001.pdf

 

Federman, J. (1999). The politics of compassion. Unpublished doctoral thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

 

Wilson, B. J., Linz, D., Federman, J., Smith, S., Bryant, P., Nathanson, A., …Lingsweiler, R. (1999). The choices and consequences evaluation: A study of court TV's anti-violence curriculum. Santa Barbara: University of California. Retreived from http://www.saybrook.edu/sites/default/files/faculty/choices_consequences...

 

Federman, J. (Ed.) (1998). National television violence study executive summary (Vol. 3). Santa Barbara: University of California. Retrieved from http://www.saybrook.edu/sites/default/files/faculty/NTVVSexecsum.pdf

 

Federman, J. (1998). Reinvisioning the field of peace studies. PSA News: Newsletter of the Peace Studies Association, 4(2), 1-4.

 

Federman, J. (1996). Media ratings: Design, use and consequences. Studio City, CA: Mediascope.

 

Federman, J. (Winter, 1993). Curbing media violence: Lessons from other countries. Amplifier (Journal of the Division 46, Media Psychology Section of the American Psychological Association), 6-12.

 

Federman, J. (l982). Toward a world peace movement. Humanities in Society, 5(1, 2), 137-147.

 

Important Conference Presentations

Teaching Global Social Transformation: Approaches to Curriculum Design," Best Practices in Peace Education Workshop, Peace and Justice Studies Association Annual Conference, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, California, October 14-17, 2004.
 

"Forging an Alternative to Permanent War: Strategies for Peace and Justice in the Post-9/11 World," Peace and Justice Studies Association Annual Conference, Olympia, Washington, October 9-12, 2003.
 

“Overcoming Conceptual Barriers to Universal Compassion,” Peace and Justice Studies Association Annual Conference, Seattle Washington, October 4-6, 2001
 

"The Politics of Compassion and the Pursuit of Community," American Political Science Association Annual Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August 31-September 3, 1995
 

"Transformative Mediation," North American Conference on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 30, 1995
 

"The Social Effects of Video Game Violence," American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Los Angeles, California, August 13, 1994

 

Research Interests

My chief research interest is in helping people reframe and reconceive their conceptions of the human potential (personal and societal). For example, my research on universal compassion focuses on overcoming commonly held beliefs about society and human nature that limit people’s assessment of the probability of achieving that degree of compassion. These include beliefs regarding a fundamental scarcity of resources; the inevitability of violence; disbelief in the ability of people to have or maintain truly universal compassion; and a low estimation of the potential for social change in general. I have also conducted research on conflict resolution, violence prevention, media violence, and nonviolence theory and practice.

Research Expertise

I have participated in and authored case study research, action research, and field experimental research.

Expertise Working with Saybrook Students

I am very happy to be teaching at Saybrook because the design of the curriculum very closely reflects my own values, interests and experiences.

My teaching emphasis is supporting students as they develop and test novel perspectives and theories of the human potential, encouraging them to visualize their highest goals and act upon those visualizations. To paraphrase Carl Rogers, I believe in student-centered teaching. I am especially encouraging of students who want to think outside the box and challenge traditional preconceptions and orthodoxies within the field and in society.

As a long-time peace researcher and activist, I have extensive contacts with non-governmental organizations in the area of conflict resolution, nonviolence, violence prevention, peace, and human rights that will be useful in helping students find internship opportunities.

Research Expertise

Research Expertise Rating Guide:

  1. studied in a class or have read intensively on my own
  2. special training in the form of a workshop or equivalent
  3. taught a class in, or supervised research using this method (research practicum, on a dissertation or master's committee
  4. used in research myself
  5. published or presented at conferences my research using this method

Methods Traditionally Considered As Quantitative (But Need Not Be)

Laboratory Research
Field Experiments 4
Randomized Controlled Clinical
Quasi-experimental methods
Correlational Methods

Methods That Could Use Quantitative Or Qualitative Methods

Action Research
Survey Research
Interview Research 4
Observational Research
Epidemiological Research
Ethnography
Focus Groups
Self-Observational Methods
Narrative Methods
Feminist Methods
Content Analysis
Discovery-Oriented (psychotherapy)
Events paradigm (psychotherapy)
Archival Research
Case History Methods
Appreciative Inquiry
Multiple Case Depth Research
Hermeneutic Single Case Efficacy Design
Longitudinal research
Cross-sectional research

Methods Primarily Associated With Qualitative Research (But May Also Use Quantitative)

Ethnoautobiographical research
Hermeneutics
Grounded Theory
Phenomenology
Heuristic Research

Types of Analysis

Simple Parametric Statistics (t-test, etc.)
Confidence intervals
Analysis of Variance (including MANOVA)
Analysis of Covariance
Regression (including multiple regression)
Discriminant Function Analysis
Structural Equation Modeling/Path Analysis
Causal Modeling
Cluster Analysis
Survival Analysis
Nonparametrics
Bayesian Analysis
Meta-analysis and effect sizes
Factor Analysis
Time series analysis
Multidimensional scaling