The Saybrook Forum

Posts

University

Saybook's Donna Nassor appointed as a New York representative of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA)

01/17/2012

Psychology/Social Transformation PhD student Donna Nassor has been appointed as a New York representative of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA), a non-governmental organization in consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) since the 1980s.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Fostering empathy in education

01/17/2012

The Culture of Empathy website is a growing portal for resources and information about the values of empathy and compassion. It contains the largest collection of articles, conferences, definitions, experts, history, interviews, videos, science and much more about empathy and compassion. To stay up to date on the latest, you can sign up for the newsletter.

CanThe Center for Building a Culture of Empathy's mission is to contribute to growing a movement of worldwide compassion. This is accomplished through a variety of means. First is by community organizing, bringing people together and holding in-person and online meetings to help build the movement. Next is by collecting and organizing related Internet material. Currently, a one-year online international conference has been launched on the question of 'How Can We Build a Culture of Empathy and Compassion?'   (November 1, 2011 - October 2, 2012)

The conference consists of an ongoing series of online panel discussions with empathy and compassion experts from all fields and walks of life. The panels take place using Skype group video conferencing and are recorded and uploaded to Youtube for viewing at any time.

Location:  Online on Skype and YouTube
Date:  A one year 'rolling' conference starting November 1, 2011 and ending Oct 2, 2012
Vision: We envision a global culture of empathy and compassion, in a world where people experience the joy of being connected to each other and interconnected with all life.   

Mission: The 'How Can We Build a Culture of Empathy and Compassion?' conference will contribute to building a global culture of empathy and compassion by bringing interested people from various world communities together to

  • foster synergy, build awareness and grow momentum,

  • inspire, support and motivate one another

  • share ideas and strategies

  • network and develop partnerships

  • generate plans for empathic action.

Additionally, a sub-conference asks: How to Nurture, Foster and Teach Empathy in the Education System?


A section of the conference will be specifically about how to develop a comprehensive empathy curriculum for the education system. Educators are invited to propose panels on this topic.

Continue Reading

University

Rollo May's last book, "The Psychology of Existence," to be re-issued

01/16/2012

McGraw-Hill has announced that it is re-issuing The Psychology of Existence, the last book that pioneering existential psychologist Rollo May wrote in 2004.

May was one of the founders of Saybrook University, and wrote The Psychology of Existence with Kirk Schneider, a Saybrook graduate who is now also a member of Saybrook's faculty.

The New Existentialists has an interview with Schneider about the continued relevance of The Psychology of Existence, along with a discussion about what it was like to work with May in the last days of his life, getting him a copy of the gally proofs to review just two days before his death.

Read the interview here.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybook's Donna Nassor appointed as a New York representative of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA)

01/12/2012

Psychology/Social Transformation PhD student Donna Nassor has been appointed as a New York representative of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA), a non-governmental organization in consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) since the 1980s.

Continue Reading

Mind-Body Medicine

Meet Our Community: Lynne Shaner, PhD student in Mind-Body Medicine

01/09/2012

Lynne tudor placeLynne is a full-time mind-body specialist based in Washington, DC. She is director of Praxis: Wellness in Life & Work, a wellness practice specializing in mind-body approaches to life.

Continue Reading

University

Saybrook University to Sponsor Chip Conley "Emotional Equations" Book Signing Events

01/09/2012

San Francisco, CA, January 5, 2012 – Saybrook University announced today that it is sponsoring signing events for Chip Conley’s new book, “Emotional Equations” (January 10, Free Press). In the book, Conley, dynamic entrepreneur and author of the bestselling “Peak”, has developed a new lexicon for an emotionally intelligent age by introducing brilliantly simple formulas to help us explore and articulate something that challenges and connects us all: our emotions. Illustrating how to gain greater perspective and create the perfect equation for any situation, equations like “Joy = Love - Fear” and “Despair = Suffering - Meaning” have been reviewed for mathematical and psychological accuracy by leading experts. Conley shows us how to solve these equations (and how to formulate our own) through life examples and stories of inspiring people and role models who worked them through in their own lives.

 

The three Saybrook University sponsored events will be held in:

·         San Francisco  January 11

·         Los Angeles     January 25

·         New York        February 23

 

In addition to the above events, Chip Conley will be the keynote speaker at Saybrook University’s residential conference on January 14, 2012. This conference brings together faculty and students from Saybrook’s Graduate Colleges of Psychology and Humanistic Studies and Mind-Body Medicine for intensive classes and workshops in multiple disciplines. Chip Conley will also be the keynote speaker at Saybrook University’s LIOS Graduate College (Leadership Institute of Seattle) graduation on June 18, 2012 in Seattle, Washington.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Dr. Jürgen Kremer and Saybrook doctoral candidate Robert Jackson-Paton develop textbook on ethnoautobiography

01/09/2012

JurgenThis past fall, Saybrook's Jürgen Kremer and Robert Jackson-Paton developed and piloted a textbook for use at Sonoma State University (SSU), based on their work in ethnoautobiography . The book contains a glossary, practical activities, and case studies to help students understand ethnoautobiography and use it as an effective research tool.

Robert

Following the success of the pilot version, the book will be submitted for publication next summer and used in additional upcoming courses - both at SSU and the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS). The book is titled

Stories of Decolonization, Autobiography, Ethnicity: Unlearning Whiteness and Reclaiming Participatory Senses of Place and Society - An Ethnoautobiographical Workbook

Expanding on a manuscript that was published by Prof. Kremer in 2003, the book considers ethnoautobiography to be a practice of radical presence. A helpful glossary is included, describing central terms used in this book. Rather than call it a glossary, however, Kremer and Jackson-Paton prefer the term “conversation pieces” because these are “reflections intended to stimulate conversation” rather than inflexible and finalized definitions.

Table of Contents and Summary

Introduction

Conversation Pieces

Chapter 1: Who Am I?

The origins and varieties of ethnoautobiography are described, with three ethnoautobiographical stories as examples. Ethnoautobiography is the telling of a decolonizing story which takes an Indigenous sense of “ethno,” including ancestry, history, place (ecology), seasons, and so on.

Activity to begin cultural self-reflection.

Chapter 2: Ethnoautobiography - Why not Autobiography?

This chapter provides more detailed explanations of ethnoautobiography. In so doing, examples from published authors—including Gerald Vizenor, Gloria Anzaldua, Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Helene Cixous, and bell hooks—model elements of ethnoautobiographical narratives.

Activities to research ancestry and to expand on our autobiographies.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

A call for Apple to make a conflict-free iPhone

01/06/2012

(Parts of this post originally published by The Guardian, December 30, 2011).

Screen shot 2012-01-06 at 11.20.19 AMWhile increased access to mobile technology in an undisputed advantage for many, the manufacturing process of the phones themselves negatively impacts others. Ironically, the very people targeted for increased mobile connectivity through poverty reduction schemes are also those whose lives are in jeopardy from the mining required to make electronic devices. Mobile phones require rare earth metals that are often extracted by children and slaves in conflict zones. The idea of “blood mobiles” is modeled after the well-known campaign against blood diamonds mined in African war zones and used to perpetuate conflict (Kristof, 2010).

Nathan & Sarkar (2010) shed light on the controversy over coltan, a mineral used in mobile phones (as well as computers and other devices). While coltan only makes up a very small percentage of the raw materials used in mobile phones, it is an essential component. 30% of the world’s supply comes from the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), where its extraction directly sustains armed violence, child labor and poverty in one of the world’s deadliest conflicts. The coltan industry finances armed rebels and has become a reason for armed conflict between groups vying for control: “An ugly paradox of the 21st century is that some of our elegant symbols of modernity — smartphones, laptops and digital cameras — are built from minerals that seem to be fueling mass slaughter and rape in Congo” (Kristof, 2010, para. 2). As activist Delly Mawazo Sesete - a native of the DRC - explains in a recent article in The Guardian, Apple is "perfectly positioned to be the first company to create a Congo conflict-free phone." Sesete explains:

While conflict began as a war over ethnic tension, land rights and politics, it has increasingly turned to being a war of profit, with various armed groups fighting one another for control of strategic mineral reserves. Near the area where I grew up, there are mines with vast amounts of tungsten, tantalum, tin, and gold – minerals that make most consumer electronics in the world function.

While minerals from the Congo have enriched your life, they have often brought violence, rape and instability to my home country. That's because those armed groups fighting for control of these mineral resources use murder, extortion and mass rape as a deliberate strategy to intimidate and control local populations, which helps them secure control of mines, trading routes and other strategic areas. Living in the Congo, I saw many of these atrocities firsthand. I documented the child slaves who are forced to work in the mines in dangerous conditions. I witnessed the deadly chemicals dumped into the local environment. I saw the use of rape as a weapon. And despite receiving multiple death threats for my work, I've continued to call for peace, development and dignity in Congo's minerals trade.

But the good news is that your favorite electronics don't have to fund mass violence and rape in the Congo, and neither do mine.

That's why I'm asking Apple to make an iPhone made with conflict-free minerals from the Congo by this time next year. Apple has been an industry leader in both supply chain management and making corporate social responsibility a priority. In the past two years, Apple has taken great strides to source minerals responsibly and control their supply chain.

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Call for Submissions for the Upcoming ISSS 2012 Bulletin

01/05/2012
Call for submission of short notes or research reports and other items of interest for the upcoming ISSS 2012 Bulletin to be published in end of January 2012. These submissions will be published in the first section of the Bulletin, highlighting most recent work from the membership of ISSS. Submissions should be no longer than 1500 words (4 pages single spaced). For the bulletin, other items of...

Continue Reading

University

Saybrook Conference Sessions Open To Prospective Students This January

01/04/2012

Join us at an upcoming conference session to engage in an integral part of the Saybrook experience. For 40 years Saybrook University has offered distance education for graduate students. Combining online and residential instruction, our programs foster close contact amongst faculty and learners while offering flexibility. A key component of Saybrook's learning model, residential conference sessions bring faculty and students together, spurring intellectual creativity, collaboration, and mentorship.

Prospective students may attend and observe two sessions at the SFO Westin Hotel in Millbrae, California:

Sunday, January 15, 2012 -- 9:15 am - 12:00 pm PST

Courses and Seminars:
Renewing the Encounter Between the Human Sciences, the Arts, and the Humanities
Introduction to Person-Centered Expressive Arts for Healing and Social Change
Buddhist Pathways to Health
Systems Practice: From Systems Thinking to Systems Being
Generative and Strategic Dialogue: Intro to ORG 7044
Trauma and Transformation: The “Human”

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 -- 9:15 am - 12:00 pm PST

Courses and Seminars:
Trauma and Transformation: Social Dimensions
Intermediate Training and Education in Hypnosis (5620)
Movement, Exercise, and Health
Researching Organizations and their Complexity: Exploring Methods That Support a Systems Approach to Change
City of San Francisco Initiative: A Collaborative Project Opportunity
Creativity and Writing: Beyond the Norm

Attendees will also have the opportunity to meet with faculty and Admissions representatives. To learn more and register, please RSVP HERE!

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus