The Saybrook Forum

Posts

Alumni Messenger

Nanette Burton Mongelluzzo, PhD (2006) Releases New Book on Self-Esteem

11/17/2011
My latest book, The Everything Guide To Self-Esteem, with CD, was just released in November 2011 by Adams Media. Nanette Burton Mongelluzzo, PhD (2006) Available at Amazon.com

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook doctoral student Donna Nassor presents at APA symposium on Israeli-Palestinian conflict

11/16/2011

Portions of Donna's paper were presented at APA Division 48 Invited Symposium: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Potential Psychological Contributions to Resolution, Reconciliation, and Peace Building (August 2011, Washington DC). The full paper online can be found at Facilitate Global.

Models of Restorative Justice for Peace-Building and Transformative Societal Change In Palestine-Israel 

I come in peace with the intention of enhancing relationships, engaging in dialogue, creating alliances, building bridges and actively being a more effective agent of social change.  None of that can be done by avoiding the truth.  We can only move toward peace with justice if we collectively are willing to do what needs to be done.  I am a third generation Lebanese/Syrian American, raised as an Orthodox Christian.  Until I was 16, I thought that all Arabs were either Syrian or Lebanese and that all were Orthodox Christians.  I have a strong background in the world of business.  At the age of 36, I graduated from law school and practiced law for many years, mostly representing adults and juveniles accused of crimes as a public defender and as private counsel.  I became a lawyer because I thought I would acquire the tools to be a more effective agent of social change.  I was wrong.  Thankfully, I am now retired from the practice of law. I eventually had to admit I was almost powerless over the very broken criminal (justice) system in which I found myself working.

After helping to move mass quantities of human beings through the criminal system, in a small rural county in Pennsylvania, utilizing the punitive model, I discovered the concept of “restorative justice” (RJ)--    an effective and holistic alternative to the punitive system being used by people around world.

My experiences told me clearly that punishment was not effective in adjusting the behavior of the same people who kept coming through the justice system.  The indigenous practices of community, healing, and reconciliation had the potential to be transformative.  RJ recognizes that harm to an individual also has other layers and dimensions.  Not only is the individual affected by the harm, the community, the families of the victim and offender and the offender are also affected.

Continue Reading

Events

Building the World We Want: A 1-Day Course

11/15/2011

The Metta Center for Nonviolence is offering a one-day course called Building the World We Want exploring Gandhi's 'Constructive Programme'.

Saturday, December 17, 2011
9 am - 5:30 pm
 8115 Middlefield Drive, Petaluma, California
Beautiful world"My real politics is constructive work." 
--M.K. Gandhi 

What was “Constructive Programme?”  Why did Gandhi consider it the keystone of his campaign for India’s liberation and the overturning of colonialism (as it was then)?  How would it help us with the present struggle against globalization and corporate rule?  If it were to play a role in the Occupy and other movements of today, what form would it take — or rather is it taking, as there are innumerable efforts right now that could be considered constructive program if they were harnessed for that role? 
 
Explore these questions with us and empower yourself and your organization
to add this neglected dimension to today’s struggle for social change.  
Together we can add unforeseen power to our individual and collective
efforts.

$125 (sliding scale)
Delicious vegetarian lunch provided
To register, please contact Stephanie@MettaCenter.org, or call 707.774.6299

 

Continue Reading

Events

US Human Rights Network Annual Conference in Los Angeles - Dec. 9-11

11/15/2011

The US Human Rights Network has a broad appeal to members of the Saybrook community, covering a wide range of rights issues from a human-centered perspective.

US Human Rights Network USHRN 2011 Conf STD

Building a People-Centered Human Rights Movement!

2011 National Human Rights Conference and Membership Meeting

December 9 - 11, 2011
Radisson LAX Hotel
Los Angeles, California
 
Forces in our country are working aggressively to dismantle the social gains and human rights won through centuries of struggle by people of color, women, and workers in the United States. Now more than ever we must build a people-centered human rights movement to transform our society and the US government to ensure that it respects, protects and fulfills the human rights of all.

The Conference will feature a host of critical human rights trainings for novices and veterans alike, covering these and other critical areas:

  • Defending the rights of Indigenous and Oppressed Peoples
  • Attaining economic and social rights in the United States
  • Securing sexual and gender rights
  • Fighting for racial justice and immigrant rights
  • Fighting against torture and mass incarceration

Register now! For more information visit www.ushrnetwork.org/2011conference or email info@ushrnetwork.org.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Videos of Peace Movements Worldwide event now online!

11/14/2011

On October 30th, AHIMSA and The Metta Center for Nonviolence Education presented a free public forum, entitled: Taking stock of peace: Inspiration from Peace Movements Worldwide.

This special event launched the recent publication of Peace Movements Worldwide, a three-volume anthology with chapters covering insights and action from every continent with accounts of courageous and creative actions, ranging from the personal to the global.

Saybrook professor Marc Pilisuk co-edited the volume and speakers included members of the Saybrook community: Donald Rothberg, Melissa Anderson-Hinn, Angel Ryono, Gianina Pellegrini, and moderator Bob Flax.

The event was recorded by Wolfgang Saumweber and made available free online, in 5 parts.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Information from the Peace and Justice Studies Association (PJSA) on Available Trainings in Non-Violence

11/11/2011
Here are a few groups that have done lots of training in nonviolence and could share a range of useful materials: American Friends Service Committee offers training for a wide range of nonviolent campaigns and to help people considering participation in an act of CD. Here's a link: www.afsc.org/resource/nonviolent-direct-action-civil-disobedience http://www.afsc.org/resource/nonviolent-direct-...

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Resources for training in nonviolence and civil resistance

11/11/2011

With the many Occupy movements currently underway worldwide, there is an increased need for preparation and training in nonviolent protest. Many resources have been offered on the Peace and Justice Studies Association listserv, including the following.

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Eric Kreuter, Ph.D.'06 Presented Case Study on Victimization in Chongqing, China in October

11/10/2011
Alumnus Eric Kreuter, Ph.D.'06 presented a case study on victimization in Chongqing, China in October at the 2nd Annual World Forensic Congress. Eric also has an upcoming book, to be released Dec 2011: Victimization Analyzed Through the Voices of a Predator: Expansion of a Single Case Study, Nova Science Publishers.

Continue Reading

Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Debating human rights in the IT industry

11/10/2011

By Jillian York, 10/31/2011, in Movements.org

@mx_500(This article is cross posted from Al Jazeera English)

Last week in San Francisco, a unique gathering occurred. Dubbed "Rightscon" (Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference), the conference attracted Silicon Valley executives, activists, academics and NGOs, all gathered in one room to debate the role of human rights within the tech industry, as well as the role of the tech industry in serving human rights interests. 

Incidents from the past year - from the denial of service to WikiLeaks by Amazon, PayPal and others to the complicity of international companies in Egypt’s telecommunications shutdown - have put the subject of human rights at the forefront of discussion within the technology industry. While companies debate their responsibilities to serve activists, whose particular circumstances may be seen as "edge cases", NGOs often frame their advocacy within the same rubric.

Egyptian activist Alaa Abd El Fattah, who is currently under threat of military prosecution, argued that the framing is wrong, stating that both parties should think more about ordinary users. Referring specifically to the controversysurrounding identity on social networks, Facebook and Google+, he said:

"When ordinary users can’t choose a pseudonym, their identity is negated. Women know the importance of negotiating identity, they do it all the time. So do gays, religious minorities, whatever. We choose how to reveal who I am, on what terms and in what basis. When you restrict me from doing this, you violate my human rights… It is about who I am, my identity, how I express myself and how I communicate with the world."

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Alumna Deirdre Bundy, M.A. '09 Releases New Playball Newsletter

11/10/2011
Click here to see the new Playball Newsletter about a sports skills and movement program for kids age 2 to 6 created by Alumna Deirdre Bundy, M.A. '09.

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus