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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Jennifer Achord Rountree, PhD '10 and Faculty Member Marc Pilisuk Announce Book Releases

04/05/2011
Alumna Jennifer Achord Rountree and Faculty Member Marc Pilisuk Announce Book Releases: Who Benefits From Global Violence and War: Uncovering a Destructive System by Marc Pilisuk with Jennifer Achord Rountree. Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger 2008 Peace Movements World-wide (3 volumes) Marc Pilisuk and Michael Nagler (Eds) Praeger/ABC-clio. Santa Barbara, CA: 2011 Titles are available from...

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Alumni Messenger

Faculty Position Open in Peace and Conflict Studies at Conrad Grebel University College at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

04/05/2011
Conrad Grebel University College (a Mennonite College at the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) invites applications for a full-time continuing contract faculty position in the undergraduate Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) program and the proposed graduate PACS program, with a teaching and research specialty in interdisciplinary and multi-sector approaches to peace studies. A...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Kirk Schneider, PhD '84 Releases New Blog Entry in Psychology Today

04/05/2011
A new Psychology Today blog entry from Kirk Schneider, PhD '84 Thoughts on an Awe-Inspiring Career in Counseling http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/awakening-awe/201102/thoughts-awe-inspiring-career-in-counseling Kirk J. Schneider, Ph.D. Website: http://www.kirkjschneider.com kschneider56@gmail.com

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Teresa Bailey, PhD '96 Published Article in Child Neuropsychology

04/05/2011
Alumna Teresa Bailey, PhD '96 published an article in Child Neuropsychology, the only peer-reviewed journal devoted exclusively to child and adolescent developmental neuropsychology. Her lead article was an invited review. Its focus is a description of central auditory processing in children and adolescents, how children with auditory processing disorders can be misdiagnosed with attention...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Darlene B. Viggiano, Ph.D. '10 (MFT) Publishes Article: Some Recent Findings on Synchronicity, Dream-Like Experiences, and Spiritual Emergence Processes

04/05/2011
Alumna Darlene B. Viggiano, Ph.D. '10 (MFT)Publishes Article: Some Recent Findings on Synchronicity, Dream-Like Experiences, and Spiritual Emergence Processes http://www.rhine.org/volume3issue1/page25.htm Abstract: Data driven, criteria-based science on dream-like experiences, spiritual emergence processes, and the Jungian concept of synchronicity is presented in a hermeneutic literature...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Rivka Bertisch Meir, PhD '05 Awarded Fellowship by EPA; Presented a Symposium about her Saybrook Dissertation

04/05/2011
Alumna Rivka Bertisch Meir, PhD '05 Awarded Fellowship by EPA; Presented a Symposium about her Saybrook Dissertation Symposium- William Dawes A CLINICAL SYMPOSIA: POINT IN TIME THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUE Friday, March 11, 2011
12:00 PM - 1:20 PM POINT IN TIME™ THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUE TO RECALL, DECODE AND HEAL TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCES A retrospective study of multiple cases was conducted to...

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Alumni Messenger

Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships

04/05/2011
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships The Vanier CGS program aims to attract and retainworld-class doctoral students by supporting students who demonstrate both leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement in graduate studies. Valued at $50,000 a year for three years, the Vanier is one of Canada’s most prestigious graduate awards. The Vanier Scholarships support doctoral...

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook Alumna Jacquie Lewis, PhD '06 to Present Paper at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Humanistic Psychology, April 14-18

04/05/2011
Saybrook Alumna Jacquie Lewis, PhD '06 to Present Paper at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Humanistic Psychology, April 14-18, 2011 Moving Dreams Off the Bed and Onto the Couch: The Importance of Dreamwork when Working with the Whole Person Bring a dream to this workshop! People spend roughly one third of their lives asleep. The average number of dreams that humans have each night is...

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University

Is the media portrayal of disasters itself disastrous?

04/05/2011

www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], from Wikimedia Commons">TV-camera Weeks after a disaster, such as in Japan or Christchurch, we are inundated with imagery and new stories. Tucked in between the sound bites of horror, grief and sadness were a few stories highlighting heroism, altruism and empathy. 

A recent study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology shows a direct link between watching these media reports of selfless actions in the face of tragedy our own behavior. People who observe such acts are more likely to help others – and this has big implications for the way the media portrays human behavior day in and day out. 

Lead author Karl Aquino at the Sauder School of Business and co-author Brent McFerran, assistant professor of marketing at the University of Michigan, wanted to know whether or not we experienced what they termed a “moral elevation” after seeing others perform an act of kindness. 

The participants were randomly assigned to read one of two news stories. One described the 2006 school shooting at the Amish schoolhouse and the parents’ act of forgiveness and gift of money to the shooters family. The second story was about a couples’ experience of watching a beautiful sunset together. They found that those who already had a stronger sense of moral identity were more likely to give more to others after watching a news story about altruism.

This may explain the surges of giving after a disasters, especially after all of the bad news has given way to stories of triumph. 

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University

Getting your groove on is good medicine

04/04/2011

Finnerud_dancing Anybody want to dance? 

Dancing has never been a fad … indeed it’s likely one of the first arts human beings created … but even so it seems like there’s a lot of it coming up today.  Turn on your television and what do you see?  Dancing with the Stars, America’s Best Dance Crew, So You Think You Can Dance …

Much of this has the reputation as being just reality TV, but could it also be an expression of something joyful, even healthy? 

In a recent article, Psychology today spoke to the mounting and compelling evidence suggesting that “getting your groove on” is psychologically, physically, and spiritually invigorating. 

Researchers at the University of New England looked at the effects of “tango dancing” over a period of six weeks with people diagnosed with depression and other mental health issues. Researcher Rosa Pinniger found that tango dancing with a partner is an effective alternative therapy for those suffering from anxiety and depression. Tango dancing was found to interrupt the negative cyclic thought patterns through the practice of “mindful awareness” and connection with one’s partner and the dance routine. Through the mindfulness practices that the tango dance requires, participants experienced freedom from their detrimental thought patterns that led to the symptoms of anxiety and depression.

The expressivity inherent in tango and other dance exercise regimens help people release emotions that have been “stored” in the body; keeping it all in the body can have deleterious health effects.  Indeed, Zumba, body movement, and other creative arts practices are increasingly becoming part of the realm of psychotherapeutic practice under the umbrella of expressive arts therapies. Leading the revolution in training expressive arts therapists is Dr. Natalie Rogers, daughter of the late humanist Carl Rogers.

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