Alumni Messenger

04/05/2011

Alumna Teresa Bailey, PhD '96 Published Article in Child Neuropsychology

Alumna Teresa Bailey, PhD '96 published an article in Child Neuropsychology, the only peer-reviewed journal devoted exclusively to child and adolescent developmental neuropsychology.

Her lead article was an invited review. Its focus is a description of central auditory processing in children and adolescents, how children with auditory processing disorders can be misdiagnosed with attention disorders, and the role of auditory processing in reading and language disorders.

AUDITORY PATHWAYS AND PROCESSES: IMPLICATIONS FOR NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

Teresa Bailey

Abstract:

Neuroscience research on auditory processing pathways and their behavioral and electrophysiological correlates has taken place largely outside the field of clinical neuropsychology. Deviations and disruptions in auditory pathways in children and adolescents result in awell-documented range of developmental and learning impairments frequently referred forneuropsychological evaluation. This review is an introduction to research from the lastdecade. It describes auditory cortical and subcortical pathways and processes and relatesrecent research to specific conditions and questions neuropsychologists commonly encounter. Auditory processing disorders’ comorbidity with ADHD and language-based disorders andresearch addressing the challenges of assessment and differential diagnosis are discussed.

Dr. Bailey presented a 3-hour continuing education workshop based on this paper at the 2010 American College of Professional Neuropsychology annual meeting in Las Vegas.

She is currently in private practice, performing life-span neuropsychological and psychological evaluations in Los Altos, CA, and is an adjunct faculty member at Pacific Graduate School of Psychology at Palo Alto University, in Palo Alto, CA, where she teaches assessment and psychodynamic psychotherapy courses.

Teresa Bailey, Ph.D., History, Stanford U.; Ph.D., Psychology, Saybrook U.

Posted at 01:50 PM

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus

Comments