Saybrook Links

Is Carl Jung having an American Renaissance?

08/02/2011

220px-Hall_Freud_Jung_in_front_of_Clark_1909 That's the question asked by Saybrook Psychology Professor Eugene Taylor, who has recently been asked to review two books about Jung's work for the APA's website.  

A recent upswing in positive reviews of Jung's work, new analysis about Jung's insights, and popular acclaim, Taylor suggests, are signs that even academic psychology - long dominated by "experimentalists" who didn't believe anything they couldn't measure under laboratory conditions - is accepting the value of depth psychology's approach to the human mind.

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Our youth obsessed culture is about to get a shock

07/27/2011

The first wave of Baby Boomers are retiring, and by some estimates one-in-five Americans will be over 65 by 2030. 

How does a culture obsessed with youth cope? 

So far, most of our fixes have been technological - and amazing new gadgets to help the elderly function are in the works.

But even the researchers behind these new inventions admit it:  our society can't handle this "silver tsumani" without fundamentally changing they way it handles the elderly. 

An essay at The New Existentialists suggests that psychology should be playing a key role in this transition.  That instead of just trying to "fix" symptoms, psychologists have a vital role to play in providing healthy perspective to people about the a life that includes old age. 

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Why is the NFL better at compromising than congress?

07/26/2011

800px-Shake_hand This week the NFL announced it had reached an agreement with its players. 

Republicans and Democrats?  Not so much. 

In his recent book, On Compromise and Rotten Compromises, Avishai Margolit, professor emeritus of philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, refers to compromise as “an ambivalent concept.” On the one hand, we laud those who can preserve friendship or peace through cooperation. On the other hand, we revile those who too readily accede to intransigence. Compromise can be pragmatic and strategic, consider the resolution of the Cuban missile crisis; compromise can be cowardly and weak, consider much of the historic judgment against policies of appeasement during the rise of Nazi Germany. In an environment where words are chosen carefully to frame a perception in order to influence another’s thinking, how we conceptualize compromise matters.

Read more about compromise and America at Rethinking Complexity

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Why are we all less happy?

07/25/2011

In 2009 a major study showed that women were increasingly unhappy in the modern world – and a host of pundits, psychologists, and sociologists asked “What’s happened to the fairer sex?” 

Was it feminism that was making women less happy?  Economic inequality?  Higher expectations?  Loneliness?  Feminism?  (That one came up a lot.  Apparently people like to blame things on feminism).

Two years later, another data set has been analyzed, and it turns out that the reason more women are unhappy has nothing to do with women.  According to the data, we’re ALL less satisfied with life than we were 25 years ago.

Why?  What does it mean?  At the New Existentialists, they have a pretty good idea:  it means we've been trying to become happy by proxy, substituting medication and commercialization for an inner life.  Turns out that doesn't work. 

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Are poets crazy?

07/20/2011

432px-William_wordsworth A lot of people seem to think so:  the link between "genius" and "madness" is a well established cultural cliche.

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Does environmentalism = social justice?

07/07/2011

450px-Begraisiere3 On the Rethinking Complexity blog, Saybrook Organizational Systems faculty member Kathia Laszlo makes a fascinating point:  "There is no environmental sustainability without social sustainability."

Is this true?  Does solving our planet's environmental crisis mean also addressing the social needs of its citizens? 

I think she makes a compelling case.  Let us know what you think in the comments section.

 Photo by Patricia Ripnel

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The power of place -- in Cuba

06/02/2011

800px-Necropolis_colon_habana Saybrook OS PhD student Aimee Juarez recently returned from a trip to Cuba -- and has thoughts about how "place" impacts "consciousness."

Read Part 1

Read part 2

 

How have specific places affected you?  Do you think differently in certain spots?  Tell us about it in the comments section below. 

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How should we feel about killing a monster?

06/02/2011

At the LIOS blog, David Franklin wants to know if celebrating is an appropriate response to the death of Osama bin Laden. 

Do we give ourselves a pat on the back, or do we recognize that we have to take our moral obligation to be better just as seriously in victory? 

Read the post, and tell us what you think.

 

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Reports from the UN Commission on the Status of Women

03/06/2011

What do the uprisings in the Middle East mean for the women who live there? UN Commission on the Status of Women

Do women have equal access to social networking technology? 

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Saybrook President Mark Schulamn interview with Natural Medicine

12/20/2010

Saybrook logo Saybrook President Mark Schulman spoke this month with the journal National Medicine, recording an interview that covers everything from Saybrook’s history to how mind-body medicine is changing the medical paradigm.

If you’ve ever wondered about the connection between humanistic psychology and mind-body medicine, or wondered about how to tell the legitimate science of integrative health from the pseudoscience that often surrounds it, you’ll want to listen to this interview.

 

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