The Saybrook Forum

Posts

New Existentialists

How To Change A Student's Life Forever

01/23/2014
How To Change A Student's Life Forever
These days we think of students as precious little orchids whose self-esteem must not be bruised by their education. The notion of a “teacher” as an authority figure is out of fashion. Have we got it all wrong? Writing recently in the Wall Street Journal, author Joanne Lipman made a case that an old-fashioned education is still the best education: that teachers who are strict, who are critical, who care about your performance more than your self-esteem, and who believe that “praise makes you weak … while stress makes you strong,” are the best at turning young...

Continue Reading

Rethinking Complexity

An Ecology of Life: Systems Theory, Relational Knowing and Stories to Reweave the World

01/22/2014
An Ecology of Life:  Systems Theory, Relational Knowing and Stories to Reweave the World
This is the title of a seminar I will be offering next week at Saybrook’s Residential Conference to launch the spring semester. I’m excited to be offering it in collaboration with my dear friend and colleague Nora Bateson who has produced a profound film about her father — the anthropologist and systems theorist Gregory Bateson. Gregory was a faculty member at Saybrook in the 70s and his work and legacy has been part of Saybrook’s educational fabric since then. “What is the pattern that connects the crab to the lobster and the primrose to the orchid, and all of...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

I Kicked Facebook and My Senses Kicked Into High Gear

01/22/2014
I Kicked Facebook and My Senses Kicked Into High Gear
When I was about 18 years old, I made a decision to stop smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol completely. I don’t believe that I had a problem with abuse, and my decision was of my own motivation. I was an experimenting teenager. However, I had been exposed to addiction in my family and possessed a healthy degree of vigilance around substances. I was also transitioning into adulthood, and I think that rite of passage encouraged me into a different way of being. Playing with mind-altering substances lost its intrigue. I remember sitting in my living room armchair one day around this...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

On Teaching Diversity

01/21/2014
On Teaching Diversity
I grew up as a young girl in a small town in Southern Colorado. There, we were one of very few Hispanic families, and I was extremely aware of how different I was—my dark brown, almost black hair, stood out like a sore thumb amongst the sea of light brown and blondes around me. My dark olive skin that quickly tanned in the summer was further testament to my Native American heritage, and I hated it. I hated being the only one who looked like me in my class. I hated that I was so obviously different, and my self-loathing came out in a bad attitude, mostly directed at the girls who looked...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

In Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

01/20/2014
In Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Today we remember the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Rather than present secondhand analyses or interpretations, the New Existentialists will let the work of Dr. King speak for itself. We direct you to some of the following links to read some of his writings and his correspondence, as well as watch or listen to some of his talks and speeches. Of course, his most famous speech, "I Have a Dream" from August 1963, is always an excellent place to start. The website for The King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, established by Dr. King's widow, Coretta Scott King,...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

The Paradox of Alcohol: Confessions of a Non-Drinker

01/17/2014
The Paradox of Alcohol: Confessions of a Non-Drinker
Recently, I was at yet another Chinese Banquet and faced the pressure once again to drink and be merry. Except, I was not very merry. People kept asking me why I don’t drink, and I gave my usual response, which was that I haven’t developed a taste for alcohol. If I insist upon this answer, my hosts will thankfully usually relent, and I’m left feeling a bit awkward and guilty for being a bit of a party-pooper for others will not drink nor really fully throw themselves into their drinking if the guest of honor does not participate. As I’m told, it is no fun to drink...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Uncertainty and Doubt within the Change Process: The Risk of Becoming New

01/16/2014
Uncertainty and Doubt within the Change Process: The Risk of Becoming New
As the New Year begins to unfold, we likely have a heightened awareness of the healing power of the “new” in contrast to the destructive power of the “old.” We yearn to free ourselves from the shackles of limiting ways of being, from behavior patterns that have enslaved us for years, or that perhaps were created through choices during this last year…decisions that we now regret and the consequences of which we now resolve to change. The beginning of a new year brings with it the hope that we can become new, that our lives can be positively transformed, and we...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Can Anybody Tell Me...

01/15/2014
Can Anybody Tell Me...
80 times a day, or a hundred, or more. Seemed like a million, by the end of a shift. The man with Korsakoff's syndrome repeats the same question over and over, each time forgetting whatever answer he has obtained usually within a few seconds. Can anybody tell me where I'm at and why I'm here? We try to be patient with him. Those of us with any patience left, that is. But that same question: can anybody tell me.... Minute after minute, day after day, week after week, month after month. And no ability to learn from experience, to process an answer. Sometimes we'd try to...

Continue Reading

Rethinking Complexity

Can we fix charities in the U.S.?

01/14/2014
Can we fix charities in the U.S.?
Dan Pallotta, is a father, activist, and fundraiser who is speaking out against the current way that nonprofits operate. In March, 2013 Pallotta presented a TED Talk that passionately discusses how to change the way we think about a charity. He identifies a double standard—where too many nonprofits are rewarded for how little they spend and not on what they get done.  There are over 1.5 million nonprofit organizations that employ 9.2% of the population in the United States. Considering the significance and impact of the American philanthropic sector, Pallotta makes three major...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Let’s Keep Our Eye On The Ball

01/14/2014
Let’s Keep Our Eye On The Ball
It was a warm Saturday Nebraska afternoon in October, and at the ripe old age of 20, I was on a weekend retreat with about 25 of my fellow students. The purpose of the retreat was to reflect on the adjustments and changes we would all be facing as we moved from college classrooms and dorm rooms into the real world of work. However, at this particular moment, a number of us were involved in a rather competitive game of volleyball. The trash talk was flying back and forth as serves were traded, and points were scored. At one point, a member of my team delivered a crushing spike over the net...

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus