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Mind-Body Medicine

Integrative Medicine in Scranton Pennsylvania and on the Island of St. Maarten: Meet MBM Student Peter Amato

04/28/2012

 

            Peter Amato is passionate about the healing potential of integrative medicine, and takes an active role in the ongoing transformation of health care.  His passion is evident at his integrative wellness centers, Inner Harmony.  The original center is located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, Peter’s hometown.  The other center is located on the beautiful island of St. Maarten in the Caribbean, Peter’s part-time home.  In addition to running two integrative healthcare facilities, Peter has recently expanded his work to collaborate with the Integrative Life Centers in Nashville, Tennessee (www.integrativelifecenter.com), and has authored a book, Soul Silence, a spiritually focused way to navigate recovery.  Deepak Chopra's gracious endorsement graces the cover.

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Rethinking Complexity

Foreign Policy: Who's Paying Attention?

04/27/2012
Foreign Policy: Who's Paying Attention?
As the U.S. election rhetoric heats up and the Republican and Democratic parties advocate their strongly-held positions, I'm afraid that something important is getting lost. Media-professed wars on women, the poor, and students obscure an international reality that is turbulent, unstable, and dangerous. As an international policy wonk, I pay attention to global affairs and follow certain writers that explain and clarify events from different parts of the world. Ahmed Rashid is a journalist whose writings are precise, articulate, and accurate. I read almost everything he writes. After the...

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New Existentialists

Education’s Lost Citizenship

04/27/2012
Education’s Lost Citizenship
Anyone in higher education today knows that the field is drastically changing. Nervous academics and administrators are engaging in intense debate regarding the causes of the problems and scrambling to find solutions before they become imposed upon the academy by accreditation bodies. It is evident that a myriad of factors contributed to the current state of education. I will focus on a few important contributing factors and their role in one of the most substantial sacrifices being made in higher education today: the preparation for citizenship. Historically, education was about much more...

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook Alumna Myrna Araneta Honored with Award of Distinction

04/26/2012
Saybrook University and the Saybrook Alumni Association are pleased to announce that Organizational Systems Alumna Dr. Myrna Araneta was awarded the 14th Annual Women of Distinction Award in Education by the Southern Nevada Division of The National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO). Founded in 1975, NAWBO is known as the voice of America's 10.6 million women-owned businesses. The...

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New Existentialists

A Tribute to Jim Bugental

04/26/2012
A Tribute to Jim Bugental
At the 2011 APA Convention last August, I was asked to accept, in tandem with Kirk Schneider, the Lifetime Achievement Award, which was awarded posthumously to my teacher and friend Jim Bugental. I began it with a poem: If his penetrating gaze, twinkling eyes and inviting presence, ever captured you, then you knew Jim Bugental. If you ever laughed at his lame limericks or puzzled at his word games, then you knew Jim Bugental. If you ever chided him for his politically incorrect, risqué comments that he delivered to the very end, then you knew Jim Bugental. If you ever marveled at his...

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Rethinking Complexity

What Does It Take to be an Entrepreneurial Leader?

04/25/2012
What Does It Take to be an Entrepreneurial Leader?
In preparing to facilitate a conversation with Chip Conley, founder of America’s second largest boutique hotel chain Joie de Vivre Hospitality, I had the opportunity to consider whether there are differences in the way successful entrepreneurial  leaders engage as leaders compared to leaders in larger, more established organizations. Does starting and growing an organization require different ways of being and doing, possibly different personal characteristics, than what is called for in leaders of well established organizations? The theory I learned in my MBA program pointed to...

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Creativity

CREATIVITY IN THE NEWS

04/25/2012

Study Reveals Global Creativity Gap

Universal Concern that Creativity is Suffering at Work and School

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New Existentialists

Considering Existential Joy

04/25/2012
Considering Existential Joy
Existential joy is the moment of exaltation in which we are at one with the world and conscious of our being in a kind of illumination that carries a deep conviction with it. This is a state of being that many people seek to experience in their lives. If we cannot have it all of the time, we at least want that sensation coursing through us most of the time. This is a concept that I have heard little of in the existential psychology. It is more prevalent in discussions of existential philosophy. But what is its place in psychotherapy? Existential joy is the direct opposite of existential...

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Rethinking Complexity

You’ll Never Know How Much I Love You... and Other Things that Defy Metrics

04/24/2012
You’ll Never Know How Much I Love You... and Other Things that Defy Metrics
I have labile hypertension. Having labile hypertension means my blood pressure readings bounce around. Sometimes my blood pressure reads in the normal range and sometime in the high-normal range. Unlike my internal body temperature and my pulse, there’s no obvious reason why taking two measurements under the same conditions and minutes apart should produce significantly different readings. Yet, for me, that’s the normal state of affairs. A recent visit to the doctor got me thinking about the challenge of measuring other things that are hard to pin down, like employee satisfaction...

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Mind-Body Medicine

Integrative Care for Low Back Pain: A Research Report Worth Reading

04/24/2012

 

Does the name David Eisenberg sound familiar?  David Eisenberg’s landmark 1993 study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in 1993, put complementary and alternative medicine on the radar screen for most health professionals.  Eisenberg of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School and colleagues conducted a national telephone survey of 1539 homes, and surveyed the use of alternative therapies and alternative practitioners.  The Eisenberg et al. (1993) study showed that 34 % of respondents used at least one unconventional therapy in 1990, and one third of these persons saw a provider of unconventional therapy. They saw the providers for an average of 19 visits, and paid an average of $27.60 per visit. A majority used unconventional therapy for chronic conditions, and the most frequent disorders involved were back problems (36 percent), anxiety (28 percent), headaches (27 percent), chronic pain (26 percent), and cancer or tumors (24 percent). Another important finding by Eisenberg was that 72 % of those using unconventional therapy did not disclose this information to their medical doctor.

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