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Postdoc and Student/Predoc Positions Open at the New England Complex Systems Institute

12/13/2011
Postdoc and Student/Predoc Positions The New England Complex Systems Institute has funding for postdoctoral and predoctoral research stipends and scholarships starting immediately. Candidates should be interested in contributing to new research topics in our understanding of: Socio-economic systems relevant to: The economic crisis, Conflicts and ethnic violence, Social networks and media...

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Alumni Messenger

Faculty Member Ruth Richards Shares Excerpt from New Book

12/13/2011
Colleagues, I am so pleased. This excerpt from a book I'm doing just came out officially today from www.iJourney.com. This is what we do at SAYBROOK! ...and I love the comments already there. See below. (There is even an audio version!) Let me share this as a HAPPY HOLIDAYS greeting. May we all see further and more clearly, and find (and help share) the beauty and promise in life. Thanks...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Sophia Reinders, PhD '90 Offers Course, Reawakening the Wild Heart of Wonder

12/13/2011
Dear colleagues, students and friends, Let me please tell you about a new course I will be offering in the Spring of 2012: Reawakening the Wild Heart of Wonder: Ecopsychology and Expressive Arts as Pathways towards Transformation and Healing A 40-hour Expressive Arts Certificate Program. 30 CEUs available for California MFT and LCSW license holders. This course is intended for...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Darlene B. Viggiano, Ph.D. '10 (MFT) Publishes Dissertation, Dreams and Dream-like Experiences: Their Role in Spiritual Emergence Processes

12/13/2011
Alumna Darlene B. Viggiano, Ph.D. '10 (MFT) had her dissertation published by Lambert Academic Publishing. It's called Dreams and Dream-like Experiences: Their Role in Spiritual Emergence Processes. Check it out at spiritualdreams.yolasite.com and on Amazon.com

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Alumni Messenger

Alumna Laura Mirian, PhD '06 Reviews Videos for The Quantifed Self on Vimeo

12/13/2011
Alumna Laura E Mirian, PhD (2006) is reviewing videos for Alexandra Carmichael, Director of The Quantified Self. Dr. Mirian is the content author for several videos published for The Quantifed Self on Vimeo. The Quantified Self is a collaboration of users and tool makers who share an interest in self knowledge through self-tracking. They exchange information about personal projects, the tools...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Steven Kull, PhD '80 Continues to Release New Editions of WorldPublicOpinion.org

12/13/2011
Public Consultation Finds Strong Bipartisan Support for Extending Employees' Payroll Tax Cut But Partisan Division on How to Pay for It Modest Support for Employer's Payroll Tax Cut When a representative sample of Americans was presented a detailed explanation of the costs and potential benefits of extending the payroll tax cut for employees, including strongly stated arguments for and against...

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Happy Human Rights Day 2011!

12/10/2011

December 10th is the day each year set aside to celebrate, remember and organize around human rights concerns throughout the globe. 2011 has been a year like no other for human rights. Human rights activism has never been more topical or more vital. And through the transforming power of social media, ordinary people have become human rights activists.

Screen shot 2011-12-10 at 7.48.09 AMThis year, millions of people decided the time had come to claim their rights. They took to the streets and demanded change. Many found their voices using the internet and instant messaging to inform, inspire and mobilize supporters to seek their basic human rights. Social media helped activists organize peaceful protest movements in cities across the globe - from Tunis to Madrid, from Cairo to New York - at times in the face of violent repression.

Human rights belong equally to each of us and bind us together as a global community with the same ideals and values. As a global community we all share a day in common: Human Rights Day on 10 December, when we remember the creation 63 years ago of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

For more information, visit https://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/2011/

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Events

Mind-Body Medicine Open House Webcast

12/08/2011

Meet with Mind-Body Medicine faculty and learn how mind-body medicine adopts a creative, evidence-based therapeutic use of interventions impacting our physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual lives. Ground your education in truly integrative healthcare, and empower yourself to transform lives.

  • Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm PST
  • RSVP: Please register here to attend
  • Faculty in attendance:      
    • James Gordon, MD, Dean of the College of Mind-Body Medicine
    • Donald Moss, PhD, Chair of the College of Mind-Body Medicine
    • Lisa Mastain, PhD, Director of Mentoring of the College of Mind-Body Medicine
    • Dan Sterenchuk, Associate Dean of the College of Mind-body Medicine

The Graduate College of Mind-Body Medicine offers the only fully accredited Mind-Body Medicine degrees in the U.S. PhD students may Specialize their doctoral program in research, practice, or healthcare administration.

Applications are now being accepted for Spring 2012 and Fall 2012, and scholarships and financial aid are available.

 

                     

 

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Events

PsyD Conference Call for Prospective Students

12/08/2011

Tuesday, December 13, 2011, from 12:00 - 1:00 pm PST, join us for a discussion with our PsyD Program Chair, Shawn Rubin, to learn more about a unique program that may be right for you. The Saybrook PsyD program is distinguished by its humanistic values, its emphasis on life-span development, and the ability of students to specialize in areas directly related to their passions and interests.

Our graduates work in a variety of settings, including private practice, schools and universities, community health centers, hospitals, nursing homes, the juvenile justice system, and substance abuse clinics.

Dr. Rubin teaches and supervises from an integrative existential-humanistic and contemporary psychoanalytic orientation. Since 2005 he has served as Managing Editor of the Journal for Humanistic Psychology. He is presently a Member at Large of the Society for Humanistic Psychology (APA Division 32) and is the Editor of the online Newsletter of the Society. In his private practice, Dr. Rubin treats children and their parents, adolescents, adults and LGBTQ populations. Methods of research with which Dr. Rubin has particular expertise include the heuristic, phenomenological, narrative and case study approaches of qualitative research.

Dr. Rubin will lead a discussion of the PsyD program prior to engaging students in a question and answer session. To learn more and register, please RSVP HERE.

 

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

A new century of social innovation

12/08/2011

Man has in him two distinct master impulses, the individualistic and the communal, a personal life and a social life, a personal motive of conduct and a social motive of conduct. The possibility of their opposition and the attempt to find their equation lie at the very roots of human civilisation.

-- Sri Aurobindo, The Future Evolution of Man

The upcoming decades will be different from what has gone before. Our global society is in the midst of great transformations that will usher in new social and cultural formations. Many nations have been living the high life as a result of the prosperity afforded by rapid industrial, technological and material growth. The long tail of this -- the technological revolution -- has been fundamental in stretching tentacles of dependency far and wide. Complex structures of supply, demand and energy are now near to their breaking points.

Screen shot 2011-12-08 at 9.06.28 AMThe new century for humankind begins as the traditional structures provided by governments and social and political institutions are overwhelmed and no longer capable of serving humankind in its best interests. Problems and difficulties are likely to continue rising up, like a tsunami, and manifesting in our immediate social environments. Yet unlike a natural tsunami, these social uprisings can also serve to clean the slate and clear the brushwood. They can provide the opportunity for individuals and communities to re-evaluate their life priorities. It can be a time for reconstruction and reorientation based on newly-emerging perceptions of how better to lead a fulfilling life. Yet this outcome, perhaps, will not be for everyone: There will still be many who choose to return to the old, familiar, tried-and tested ways. However, this will prove difficult, as some of the old systems will no longer be functional.

New forms of social innovation need to be encouraged to emerge from the chrysalis of the fossilized structures. By this it is meant that more appropriate and creative social, economic, technological, cultural and political edifices can replace current dysfunctional systems. For example, new -- or previous -- skill sets can return for inclusion in our social and community roles. This may force many people to shift from office and administration jobs, from the service and manufacturing sectors, toward functions that serve a regional and localized need. These may include community teaching (in both theory and practical skills), maintenance and construction, localized economies (both currency and barter), permaculture, farming, creative inventions, regional management, community committees and more. Many farms may need to shift (or return) to organic forms of agriculture and crop growth in order to combat the rise in soil depletion. As many of us are now aware, petrochemicals and synthetic fertilizers negatively polarize the soil. While they may produce apparently abundant growth in the short term, in the long term they deplete the soil and exhaust its natural growing capability. The food produced is thus often lacking in nutrients and minerals. In short, many methods now employed will be forced, or catalyzed, into change.

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