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Alumnus Steven Kull, PhD '80 Leads Discussion on Faith and Global Policy Challenges

12/06/2011
Faith and Global Policy Challenges: How Spiritual Values Shape Views on Poverty, Nuclear Risks, and Environmental Degradation --A Study of American Believers-- Wednesday, December 7, 2011 9:00 am to 10:15 am Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Choate Room 1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW Washington, DC 20036-2103 Christian religious traditions have historically engaged in addressing poverty...

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Events

Mind-Body Medicine Conference Call for Prospective Students

12/05/2011

On Wednesday, December 7th, 2011, from 12:00 pm - 1:00pm PT, Dr. Donald Moss, Chair of Saybrook's Graduate College of Mind-Body Medicine, will host a conference call to discuss unique MBM program opportunities. Developed in conjunction with James S. Gordon, Director of the Center for Mind-Body MedicineSaybrook offers the only fully accredited master's and PhD MBM degrees in the US.

Mind-body medicine (MBM) represents a new consensus view of health and wellness that combines mainstream western medicine with alternative practice; psychological health with nutritional and behavioral change.  Together, these perspectives create more effective treatments that lead to lasting health.

Dr. Moss, who serves on the Board of Directors of the Biofeedback Institute of America and is president of the American Psychological Association of Hypnosis, is an internationally sought after trainer on Mind-Body Medicine techniques to medical professionals. After providing conference call participants information about MBM programs, he will engage prospective students in an open question and answer session. To register for the event, please RSVP HERE!

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Events

PhD Organizational Systems Program Conference Call

12/05/2011

Join Dr. Nancy Southern, Organizational Systems (OS) Co-Chair, to discuss Saybrook OS programs on Tuesday, December 6th, 2011 from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm PT. OS programs are designed for students that want to contribute to emerging social needs for transformative, innovative, sustainable organizational and social change.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Global Social Justice Journal invites articles to be considered for publication

12/05/2011

The Global Social Justice Journal invites the submission of original research articles for publication. For further details including full submission guidelines, please visit the journal website.

IndexThe Global Social Justice Journal is a new Open Journal System initiative published by the Centre for International Studies at Cape Breton University http://cbu-cis.ca/. The Global Social Justice Journal disseminates peer reviewed research on all aspects of global social justice including issues of economic globalization, human rights, indigenous peoples, the environment, education, gender, class, poverty, inequality and race. The journal publishes research from disciplines including political science, philosophy, geography, economics, sociology, law, gender studies and indigenous studies. The journal welcomes the submission of articles analyzing the social impacts of markets and governments from normative or marginalized perspectives and specifically those originating in the global South. It especially welcomes the submission of articles that shed light on an otherwise neglected aspect of global social justice or that analyze alternative forms of social and political organization to the present structuring of globalization.

The Global Social Justice Journal has a commitment to the Open Access model of research dissemination and provides free public access to articles accepted for publication.

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Events

Social Transformation Concentration Conference Call for Prospective Students

12/02/2011

Saybrook provides interested learners opportunities for growth as social innovators and agents of transformative change, teaching students methods with which to consider and address critical social, political, and cultural challenges. Dr. Joel Federman, Human Science faculty member and Director of the Social Transformation Concentration, will lead an interactive conference call discussing these unique opportunities in Saybrook's transformative social change programs.

Dr. Federman's research focuses on the development of global civil society efforts aimed at realizing values including universal compassion, social justice, and peace. He will provide conference call participants information about transformative social change programs prior to engaging in a question and answer session.

Graduates of transformative social change programs have impacted change through advancement in a wide array of careers, working with NGO and NATO peacekeepers in Kosovo, developing corporate-community partnerships to further environmental education, working in an innovative rape prevention program in South Africa, and teaching in the disciplines of Psychology, Sociology, and Peace Studies. To learn more, please RVSP now!

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LIOS

Your best friend calls you and tells you he/she's really sick? How do you show you care?

12/01/2011

What an exciting place to work! LIOS Graduate College offers some amazing things and you don't need to be a student here to attend. Dan Leahy, former president, will lead the next session of the LIOS Leadership Workshop series called: Results-Focused Communication. The all-day session will run from 8:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. at LIOS, 4010 Lake Washington Blvd, NE, Suite 300, Kirkland. Discount for early registration and for LIOS alumni.

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University

Saybrook faculty member George Kent publishes two new books on food production

12/01/2011

 

GkphotoSaybrook Professor George Kent - who teaches STR 6585 "The Human Right to Adequate Food" - has published Ending Hunger Worldwide, a book that challenges the naïve notion that everyone wants hunger to end. Rather, hunger ensures that some people will work for very low pay, so employers make good profits and consumers enjoy cheap goods. Hunger analysts typically focus on agriculture yields and interventions with capsules and supplements. They rarely acknowledge that hunger is a deeply social issue that is shaped by the ways in which people treat each other. 1594518920_cf150The central concept that drives the book is that in strong communities, people don’t go hungry. Strong communities have high levels of concern about one another’s well-being. People may provide food to one another when that is necessary, but more fundamentally, they ensure that all have decent opportunities to provide for themselves.There is no shortage of food in the world; there is a shortage of opportunities.

Kent's other recent publication, Regulating Infant Formula, assesses the widespread assumption that the government or some international agency is monitoring the quality of infant formula. Government agencies sometimes raise alarms when a batch of formula is seriously Regulating Cover Sm contaminated, but they are not monitoring the product to ensure the health of children. More than half the infant formula used in the U.S. is provided by the government, at no cost to the families. The government monitors the economic impact on the manufacturers, but not the impact on the health of children. It has been estimated that more than 900 children in the U.S. die each year because they have been fed with infant formula.

Professor Kent was invited last year by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to speak on Ending on Hunger Worldwide for its Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition. The report from this event is available as a pdf for download.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Mobile phones provide new opportunities for conflict transformation in Yemen

12/01/2011

 Cross-posted from the MobileActive website. MobileActive is the 
leading
 network
 and resource on the
 use 
of 
mobile 
technology
 for
 social
 impact, providing 
field 
consulting,
 conducting 
research, 
connecting
 people 
online
 and 
through
 participatory 
events, 
and 
advancing
 the 
use 
of 
mobiles 
for 
NGOs and
 civil
 society 
organizations.

Editor's Note: This post is written by Ibrahim Mothana who is an Atlas Fellow with MobileActive.org in 2011/2012. He is a Yemeni citizen from Sanaa.

ImagesIn Yemen it’s difficult to know just how many wars are raging in the country at any one time. For centuries the country has been plagued by revenge killings and tribal conflict and the result is hundreds of deaths each year with many more injured. These localized wars can last for decades and are one of the most serious issues facing the country today.

In rural regions of Yemen, formal legal systems and a legal infrastructure do not exist, and tribal law has significant legitimacy as the only effective and efficient means of conflict resolution. Tribal laws are based on consensus, and conflicts are resolved through complex mediation processes and appeals procedures presided over by tribal elders and leaders (sheikhs).  Due to the lack of many formal legal channels and the corruption in the legal infrastructure that exists, tribal law is faster, more efficient, and enjoys greater legitimacy.

Yet one of the biggest obstacles in using tribal law as a tool for conflict resolution is the lack of communication -- which is, in fact, often the root cause of many of the disputes between tribes. Creating dialogue between communities becomes an extraordinary challenge in a country with 24 million people dispersed over 150,000 human settlements. 

Most of the tribal conflicts are dealt with customary tribal laws before becoming violent but if an armed conflict starts between tribes, then all channels of communication stop and the members of one tribe are not allowed to enter the territory of the other tribe. Only a third party can bring representatives from both sides to negotiate in a neutral environment, and convince the two or more tribal parties to negotiate or choose an arbitrator to settle the dispute. The increasing penetration of mobiles in the past years have eased this mediation process and virtual meetings have helped overcome the dilemma of finding a neutral meeting territory.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook Professor George Kent publishes 2 new books

11/30/2011

 

GkphotoSaybrook Professor George Kent - who teaches STR 6585 "The Human Right to Adequate Food" - has published Ending Hunger Worldwide, a book that challenges the naïve notion that everyone wants hunger to end. Rather, hunger ensures that some people will work for very low pay, so employers make good profits and consumers enjoy cheap goods. Hunger analysts typically focus on agriculture yields and interventions with capsules and supplements. They rarely acknowledge that hunger is a deeply social issue that is shaped by the ways in which people treat each other. 1594518920_cf150The central concept that drives the book is that in strong communities, people don’t go hungry. Strong communities have high levels of concern about one another’s well-being. People may provide food to one another when that is necessary, but more fundamentally, they ensure that all have decent opportunities to provide for themselves.There is no shortage of food in the world; there is a shortage of opportunities.

Kent's other recent publication, Regulating Infant Formula, assesses the widespread assumption that the government or some international agency is monitoring the quality of infant formula. Government agencies sometimes raise alarms when a batch of formula is seriously Regulating Cover Sm contaminated, but they are not monitoring the product to ensure the health of children. More than half the infant formula used in the U.S. is provided by the government, at no cost to the families. The government monitors the economic impact on the manufacturers, but not the impact on the health of children. It has been estimated that more than 900 children in the U.S. die each year because they have been fed with infant formula.

Professor Kent was invited last year by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to speak on Ending on Hunger Worldwide for its Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition. The report from this event is available as a pdf for download.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Directory of Open Access Journals makes quality scholarship increasingly available online

11/28/2011

The Directory of Open Access Journals increases the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. This is a valuable resource for the Saybrook community, in addition to our own Library's extensive resources.

The Directory aims to be comprehensive and cover all open access scientific and scholarly journals that use a quality control system to guarantee the content. In short a one stop shop for users to Open Access Journals.

DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals

The proliferation of freely accessible online journals, the development of subject specific pre- and e-print archives and collections of learning objects provides a very valuable supplement of scientific knowledge to the existing types of published scientific information (books, journals, databases etc.). However these valuable collections are difficult to overview and integrate in the library and information services provided by libraries for their user constituency.

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