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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook students invited to apply for the Diane Weston Scholarship

01/31/2012

In 2012 BAAPT will offer scholarships to two students pursuing master’s degree in psychology, social work, organizational development, counseling or a related field. Diane Weston, a past president and long-time member of BAAPT, was a social psychology instructor at SFSU and SJSU. Diane was diagnosed with advanced-stage cancer during her 2007-2008 term as president of the Bay Area chapter of the Association for Psychological Type. A scholarship fund was established in her name through financial contributions from BAAPT members and a matching gift from the Charles Schwab Foundation. The scholarship is comprised of the following benefits:

• 50% of the cost of a MBTI® Certification course ($900 value) in San Francisco or Mountain View in 2012
• Opportunity to co-present an Introduction to MBTI® session with a seasoned MBTI® practitioner
• Free entrance to BAAPT Special Event (March 10, 2012) for the scholarship recipient and three friends “Type and the Enneagram,” presented by Pat Wyman, M.Ed., LPC, 9:30am–3:30pm ($200 value per scholarship recipient)
• Free entrance to 2 BAAPT Workshops for the scholarship recipient and three friends See: baapt.org/workshops.html ($240 value per scholarship recipient)
• Free BAAPT membership for the scholarship recipient (March 2012 through May 2013, a $175 value) Access to extensive lending library, program and webinar recordings

Candidates must submit the following by February 17, 2012 to scholarship@baapt.org or, mail completed forms to 481 34th Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94121.

• one-page essay on your interest in Psychological Type

• recommendation from a faculty member

• application form

The Bay Area Association for Psychological Type (BAAPT) was formed in 1984 to promote the understanding, constructive use, and valuing of human diversity through the study and application of Carl Jung’s theory of Psychological Type. Our interests include the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®, David Keirsey's work on Temperament, and a variety of typology applications. We welcome all people who are interested in using psychological type personally or professionally. We invite you to join our lively monthly meetings held September through May. Local, national, and international professionals offer presentations to our group of delightful and articulate psychological type enthusiasts. BAAPT is a volunteer-based non-profit organization, and is a chapter of APTi, the Association for Psychological Type International.



Please see www.BAAPT.org/diane-weston-scholarship.html for application forms and details.

Diane McGinty Weston (INFJ) was born in Oakland, California on March 19, 1954. She graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1972. She received her bachelor's degree from UC Santa Barbara and an M.A. in Psychology from San Francisco State University. Diane worked at SRI Menlo Park as a business researcher, then as an independent consultant, and finally as an instructor in Social Psychology at San Francisco State University and San Jose State University.

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Events

Psychology Open House for Prospective Students

01/30/2012

On Tuesday, February 28th, 2012, from 5:30 - 7:00 PM PST, join us to learn more about our Psychology programs and engage in discussion with faculty members. Participants may attend the Open House on site or via conference call.

The Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies is the world's premier center for humanistic scholarship and research. We invite you to learn more about our programs:

Saybrook is a unique university of student-engaged learning in a rigorous course of study. Our mission is to provide graduate education that evokes and guides transformational change in individuals, organizations, and communities toward a just, humane, and sustainable world. Our renowned faculty, alumni, and students are thought leaders in their fields.

At the Open House, Saybrook faculty will lead discussion on select topics and answer prospective student questions. To learn more and register, please RSVP HERE.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook Student Aurora Sidney-Ando Leads Art for Peace Project

01/30/2012

Art for Peace: An Evolving Mural Project is about collaboration, dialogue, and insight
using visual arts. The means for encouraging harmonious interaction and
effective communication is through mural projects that have no end date leaving
them in a perpetual state of evolution. This project is based on three beliefs:

1. Visual arts can be used as a communication tool.

2. Clear communication moves us closer to peaceful interactions.

3. There is a reciprocal relationship between what we see and what we think and
feel.

These mural projects for peace are about encouraging intentional thoughts
towards peace. Everyone is welcome to participate and paint or write their
ideas on what is needed to move us closer to social harmony. This project is
about creating and encouraging beauty within communities and it is about
empowering people to share what they think with others in a creative visual
format.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Call for papers: Peace education from the grassroots

01/30/2012

Saybrook students are invited to submit an abstract for consideration in an upcoming publication on peace education. The finished volume will be published by Information Age Press as part of its peace education series.

The end of the twentieth century marked the beginning of an upsurge of interest in peace education. Starting in the 1950s, as exemplified in the United States with the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy (SANE), concerned citizens at the grassroots level developed peace education strategies to inform others about the dangers of violence and the need for peace. They mobilized to stop the build up of nuclear arms, to oppose the war in Vietnam, to cease support for cruel dictatorships, to support human rights, to endorse environmental sustainability, and to promote nonviolence. These campaigns. sprung up out of the hearts and minds of ordinary people concerned about their own welfare and the future of “Mother Earth.”

These grassroots peace education efforts throughout the globe teach children and adults how to live sustainably and how to resolve conflicts nonviolently. Ordinary citizens, parents, teachers, and community organizers become spiritual agents who initiate peace education programs that have contributed to the end of the war in Vietnam, disillusionment about nuclear power and weapons, regime change in places as diverse as Tunisia, Argentina, the Philippines, and Serbia, the preservation of ecosystems, the development of human rights, truth and reconciliation commissions, and the breakup of the Soviet Union.

Some of these peace education efforts took place entirely within civic society organized by community-based organizations. Some were directed towards churches and religious organizations. Others struggled to gain access to formal education systems. As a result of these efforts there are now over 300 colleges and universities around the world that have peace studies programs; schools in El Salvador, Uganda, the Philippines, and Nepal include peace education in their curricula; and schools throughout the world have adopted a variety of peacemaking strategies that teach violence prevention techniques to children and reduce violence and hostility on campuses.

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook Alumnus Dr. Steven Kull (Ph.D. '80) Publishes New Editon of WorldPublicOpinion.Org

01/27/2012
Saybrook Alumnus Dr. Steven Kull (Ph.D. '80) Publishes New Editon of WorldPublicOpinion.Org Does the public favor defense budget cuts? By Steven Kull What do average Americans say when they are faced with the budget tradeoffs... "What do average Americans say when they are faced with the budget tradeoffs on national security that policymakers face today? When polls ask in the...

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Alumni Messenger

"A Great Blog on the DSM-V Controversy" - Saybrook Faculty Member Dr. Louis Hoffman

01/27/2012
"A great blog on the DSM-V Controversy. It discusses the petition that Saybrook endorsed (and is still the only university to have endorsed)." - Saybrook Faculty Member Dr. Louis Hoffman Existentialism and the DSM-5: Humanizing Mental Health It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for ... Click Here to read more. The New...

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Events

Annual conference of the Society for Humanistic Psychology

01/27/2012

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The Fifth Annual Conference of the Society for Humanistic Psychology, Division 32 of the American Psychological Association will take place March 29 - April 1, 2012. The theme of this year's conference is Person, Consciousness and Community: The Experiential Revolution in Humanistic, Existential, Constructivist and Transpersonal Theory and Practice.

The conference is hosted by Point Park University in Pittsburgh and the Division 32 logo

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

How Technological Justice Can Fight Global Poverty

01/26/2012

Simon Trace is the CEO of the international development charity Practical Action, which works to help poor people in the developing world use technology to transform their lives.

Human development has gone hand-in-hand with technical change. Technology (defined for these purposes as both knowledge and tools) enables people to achieve well-being with less effort and drudgery, or at lower cost and with fewer resources. Technical innovation is essential for people to be able to make more effective use of the resources available to them and to respond to social, economic and environmental changes.

For those of us lucky enough to live today in one of the so-called “developed nations,” modern technology is so woven into the fabric of our daily lives that we barely notice how dependent we are on it. But remove even just one simple strand and things start to unravel very quickly, as a simple thought experiment demonstrates.


The Tech Disparity


Try to replay the first two hours of your day after getting out of bed on a cold, dark winter’s morning in your mind. Then repeat the exercise imagining how you would have fared if you did not have an electricity or gas supply to your house, your neighborhood or your place of work. That’s how a third of humanity lives. One hundred and thirty-two years after Edison introduced the first commercially viable incandescent light bulb, 1.3 billion people are still living in darkness, with no access to electricity, and 2.7 billion still cook over open fires. Clearly we have a problem ensuring well-established technologies are made available to all who need them.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Ruth Richards, students, and alumni of Saybrook's Creatitivy Studies program featured in journal

01/25/2012

Ruth RichardsI was honored to be asked by Cheryl Fracasso and Harris Friedman to contribute to a special Leaders and Mentors issue of Neuroquantology.  What a great way to highlight Creativity at Saybrook, and our new programs, I thought!  The attached article is called Creativity Revisited.

As per the format, I did need to say a few things about my own curious background and path, and added some useful research findings on creativity and mental health.   But I then switched to Saybrook, the development of our Creativity programs, and colorful figures such as Stan Krippner, and Steve Pritzker. 

The best part of all was when I got all of ten (10) Saybrook students/alums to write about their own experience, their own work with creativity, and their own visions for the future.  Clearly this (the last half) is the best part!  Judith Kolva, Ph.D., Alumna who just did the wonderful memoir for Saybrook's 40th anniversary, edited this last part, and put in her own amazing story. 

Denita Benyshek (who is almost done with her doctorate!) decided to write her own piece for Neuroquantology, which I hope you will see later on--along with her own original artwork.

See what you think (PDF).  Oh yes, there are stunning photos of these 10 Saybrook graduate students/alums, including Judith.  Are Saybrook Creativity graduate students naturally good looking? Seems so  :-) 

-- Ruth Richards

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook doctoral candidate selected as upcoming conference presenter

01/24/2012

Robert Jackson-Paton has been chosen as a presenter at the upcoming White Privilege Conference, occurring March 28-31 in Albuquerque, NM. The theme of the conference is Intersectionality: Vision, Commitment, and Sustainable Partnerships.
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He will facilitate a workshop entitled Settlement Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Covered Wagon.



As with White privilege, invisible benefits—to Whites—accrue to White settlers through the ongoing occupation of Indigenous territories taken through a variety of dishonest means, and the transmission of that conquest through generations to the present day. The subsequent access to resources, land, wealth, education, and so on manifests as both White and settlement privilege. Environmentalism as a settler narrative will be a focus of discussion. Detailed analysis, personal narratives, as well as various interactive exercises will be provided to initiate the decolonization of White settlers in the United States, and begin conversations toward collective and individual healing.



Additionally, Jackson-Paton will be leading an all-day institute - along with Saybrook Professor Jürgen Kremer and David Raymond - on the topic Facing Collective Shadows: Accounting for and Healing from White Settlement.

In this experientially grounded workshop participants will begin to face, account for, and heal from the collective shadows of White settlement in the United States. Individual and group healing exercises will be initiated and reflected upon through a variety of ways of knowing, including but not limited to the arts, movement, and mindfulness-based practices. Particular attention will be given to making connections between the conquest of First Nations (Indigenous Peoples) and ongoing White and settlement privilege in order to facilitate deep self-reflection, self-exploration and collective transformation. Conversations will include decolonization strategies for Whites, the intergenerational transmission of the trauma of settlement, cultural identities connecting Whiteness and settlement, creating ceremonial protocols for collective and individual healing, as well as the possibilities of reclaiming relationships with nature, people and society.

Prior to attending and presenting at the White Privilege Conference, Jackson-Paton has been selected to participate in Healing Historical Harms, February 6-7 at Eastern Mennonite University in Harrisonburg, VA. This training presents tools that assist in analyzing the legacies and aftermaths of historical trauma. The approach includes comprehensive strategies and practices for addressing historical trauma.

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