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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook Professor George Kent publishes 2 new books

11/30/2011

 

GkphotoSaybrook Professor George Kent - who teaches STR 6585 "The Human Right to Adequate Food" - has published Ending Hunger Worldwide, a book that challenges the naïve notion that everyone wants hunger to end. Rather, hunger ensures that some people will work for very low pay, so employers make good profits and consumers enjoy cheap goods. Hunger analysts typically focus on agriculture yields and interventions with capsules and supplements. They rarely acknowledge that hunger is a deeply social issue that is shaped by the ways in which people treat each other. 1594518920_cf150The central concept that drives the book is that in strong communities, people don’t go hungry. Strong communities have high levels of concern about one another’s well-being. People may provide food to one another when that is necessary, but more fundamentally, they ensure that all have decent opportunities to provide for themselves.There is no shortage of food in the world; there is a shortage of opportunities.

Kent's other recent publication, Regulating Infant Formula, assesses the widespread assumption that the government or some international agency is monitoring the quality of infant formula. Government agencies sometimes raise alarms when a batch of formula is seriously Regulating Cover Sm contaminated, but they are not monitoring the product to ensure the health of children. More than half the infant formula used in the U.S. is provided by the government, at no cost to the families. The government monitors the economic impact on the manufacturers, but not the impact on the health of children. It has been estimated that more than 900 children in the U.S. die each year because they have been fed with infant formula.

Professor Kent was invited last year by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to speak on Ending on Hunger Worldwide for its Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition. The report from this event is available as a pdf for download.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Directory of Open Access Journals makes quality scholarship increasingly available online

11/28/2011

The Directory of Open Access Journals increases the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. This is a valuable resource for the Saybrook community, in addition to our own Library's extensive resources.

The Directory aims to be comprehensive and cover all open access scientific and scholarly journals that use a quality control system to guarantee the content. In short a one stop shop for users to Open Access Journals.

DOAJ Directory of Open Access Journals

The proliferation of freely accessible online journals, the development of subject specific pre- and e-print archives and collections of learning objects provides a very valuable supplement of scientific knowledge to the existing types of published scientific information (books, journals, databases etc.). However these valuable collections are difficult to overview and integrate in the library and information services provided by libraries for their user constituency.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Global Nonviolent Action Database Inaugurated

11/28/2011

Inaugurated September, 2011, at Swarthmore College, under the direction of scholar and professor George Lakey, the Global Nonviolent Action Database is a valuable resource providing free access to information about hundreds of cases of nonviolent action for learning and citizen action. 

Each campaign is shown in two ways: a searchable database using fields and coded assessments of degree of success, and a 2-4 page narrative detailing the play-by-play interaction of the campaign with its opponents. The database supports searches by country, by issue, by action method used, and even by year. The topics of the campaigns are grouped in six clusters: human rights; democracy; economic justice; environment; peace; and national/ethnic identity.

The goal of the Database is to make available comparative information that will support researchers and writers to develop strategic knowledge and theory. Strategists, activist organizers, scholars, and teachers will find many uses for the database, as well as citizens wanting to expand their horizons. Journalists and bloggers will find easy access for contextualizing stories of contemporary protests they are reporting. Up until now many observers write about breaking news with a tone of surprise; coverage of the Egyptian events of early 2011 included wonderment and an assumption of protester spontaneity that showed ignorance of the developing craft of nonviolent struggle. Even a short time with the database reveals a multiplicity of connections among cases, through a shared “wave,” shared methods, shared influences, and shared time periods. Activist organizers and strategists can use the database to expand the repertoire of options for nonviolent campaigns. By exploring the use of 198+ methods of action, campaigners may become more creative and proactive than they otherwise might be. They may also calculate more carefully in relation to resources and goals, and craft a more winnable campaign than they otherwise would do.

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Events

A Just World: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on Social Justice

11/28/2011

March 30, 2012

Philadelphia, PA

Justice is a pressing concern in the world today, and discussion about it must be, beyond theory, practical and multi-disciplinary. While justice is a fundamental virtue and goal advocated by world religions, the task of creating a just world cannot be solely a religious one. All disciplines can and must contribute to the conversation about what justice is and how it can be achieved. Conference organizers invite scholars representing different disciplines to speak about various aspects of social justice from their perspectives—such as, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, the business world, and education.

Important Dates

  • January 15, 2012 - Abstract submission deadline
  • January 30, 2012 - Decision to accept/reject abstracts
  • March16, 2012 - Paper submission deadline
  • March 30, 2012 – Conference date

For more information, visit the Conference Website.

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Events

Society for Phenomenology and Media: 14th Annual International Conference

11/28/2011

The Society for Phenomenology and Media (SPM) is hosting their annual conference (February 16-19, 2012) at National University in San Diego California. Proposal and three-person panel submissions are welcome, deadline is December 1, 2011.

SPM is especially interested in attracting divergent views from feminist, new historicist, analytic, linguistic, Marxist, semiological, structuralist and post-structuralist, post-colonial, and other perspectives. The Society also seeks research in topics of interest in popular culture, cultural studies, and gender studies as they are connected to media.

For more information, visit the conference registration and information site and review details on submission guidelines.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Peace and Collaborative Development Network (PCDN) - Building Bridges, Networks and Expertise Across Sectors

11/21/2011

Created by Dr. Craig Zelizer in 2006, PCDN provides a valuable resource for Saybrook students and faculty interested in issues of international development, conflict resolution, gender mainstreaming, human rights, social entrepreneurship and related areas.

Bookcovercompressed_reasonably_smallExtensive Resource Guides offer information about scholarships, project funding, professional training, networking, IT resources, event listings and more.

The Guide to Research include:

PCDN seeks to create horizontal networking and information sharing for individuals and groups around the world. Members can chat with each other, create blogs, add to discussion topics, and share current research, experiences and challenges from the field.

The Network currently has over 22,000 members and is receiving 300,000+ hits a month. Membership is free, and emails are sent out with links to articles, recent blog posts, events, and more. (Note - members are able to control their email settings to request a daily digest rather than notification of all site actions.)

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Why Paulo Freire’s “Pedagogy of the Oppressed” is just as relevant today as ever

11/18/2011

Frantz Fanon, Iconic psychiatrist and author of books such as “Wretched of the Earth”, wrote that “literature increasingly involves itself in its only real task, which is to get society to reflect and mediate”.

Pedagogy_of_the_oppressedPaulo Freire’s landmark book, “Pedagogy of the Oppressed” is a prime example of literature that makes one reflect, cogitate and ponder all at once.

In addition, Freire’s “Pedagogy” is also the archetypal case in point of a book, which is just as relevant today as it was decades ago.

Freire was a Brazilian educator, who grew up during the poverty of the Great Depression in the 1930s and published one of his seminal works “Pedagogy of the Oppressed”, in English in 1970. Freire’s book, rooted in his experience of liberation in Brazil is equally apt in the context of the Arab Spring, and particularly after the death of Gaddafi last week.

One of Freire’s central tenets was that “education is freedom” that leads toward true liberation and that the “banking” concept of education- where students are empty vessels to be filled, acts as an instrument of oppression. He called on the cultivation of a critical consciousness (conscientizacao), enabling those to reflect upon their own reality and thereby transform it.

“How can the oppressed, as divided, unauthentic beings, participate in developing the pedagogy of their liberation” Freire asks?

It is this concept of the oppressed initiating and participating in their own liberation, as was the case in the Arab Spring, which was central to Freire’s writing.

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Alumni Messenger

Licensed Psychologist Position Open at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs, CO

11/17/2011
Announcing a full time, very well paying position at Fort Carson, Colorado in Colorado Springs. The psychologist needs to be licensed, but I'm not sure if it has to be Colorado, although Colorado is pretty easy to get licensed in. The company recruiting is listed below, which I have forwarded to you. I worked for them for 3 years and they are great. They pay $50 per hour and you are an employee...

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Alumni Messenger

Nanette Burton Mongelluzzo, PhD (2006) Releases New Book on Self-Esteem

11/17/2011
My latest book, The Everything Guide To Self-Esteem, with CD, was just released in November 2011 by Adams Media. Nanette Burton Mongelluzzo, PhD (2006) Available at Amazon.com

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Saybrook doctoral student Donna Nassor presents at APA symposium on Israeli-Palestinian conflict

11/16/2011

Portions of Donna's paper were presented at APA Division 48 Invited Symposium: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Potential Psychological Contributions to Resolution, Reconciliation, and Peace Building (August 2011, Washington DC). The full paper online can be found at Facilitate Global.

Models of Restorative Justice for Peace-Building and Transformative Societal Change In Palestine-Israel 

I come in peace with the intention of enhancing relationships, engaging in dialogue, creating alliances, building bridges and actively being a more effective agent of social change.  None of that can be done by avoiding the truth.  We can only move toward peace with justice if we collectively are willing to do what needs to be done.  I am a third generation Lebanese/Syrian American, raised as an Orthodox Christian.  Until I was 16, I thought that all Arabs were either Syrian or Lebanese and that all were Orthodox Christians.  I have a strong background in the world of business.  At the age of 36, I graduated from law school and practiced law for many years, mostly representing adults and juveniles accused of crimes as a public defender and as private counsel.  I became a lawyer because I thought I would acquire the tools to be a more effective agent of social change.  I was wrong.  Thankfully, I am now retired from the practice of law. I eventually had to admit I was almost powerless over the very broken criminal (justice) system in which I found myself working.

After helping to move mass quantities of human beings through the criminal system, in a small rural county in Pennsylvania, utilizing the punitive model, I discovered the concept of “restorative justice” (RJ)--    an effective and holistic alternative to the punitive system being used by people around world.

My experiences told me clearly that punishment was not effective in adjusting the behavior of the same people who kept coming through the justice system.  The indigenous practices of community, healing, and reconciliation had the potential to be transformative.  RJ recognizes that harm to an individual also has other layers and dimensions.  Not only is the individual affected by the harm, the community, the families of the victim and offender and the offender are also affected.

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