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Mind-Body Medicine

Meet Our Community: Kari Allen, MS Candidate in Mind-Body Medicine

10/28/2011

Kari Allen headshotBody and mind integrative healing traditions have been the cornerstone of Kari Allen’s work for over a decade. As a substance abuse counselor, she integrated expressive mediation practices into programs of recovery, in both prison and hospital settings. She taught her clients practical self-care living practices that are important components of sustained mental health and substance abuse recovery; meditation, gentle yoga, imagery & visualization and ecstatic dance practices are all part of her repertoire to assist with relief, relaxation, and the development of self awareness for healing. Kari also gently nudges the spiritual doors by inviting clients into deepening rituals and ceremony’s that are consistent with their expressed preferences.

Kari has worked in a number of community based clinical settings and offered individual, group and family services. As the owner of Sacred Bliss Mind-Body Methods, LLC, Kari uses the ancient practice of group gathering to build a sense of communal support, and personalizes experiences by offering individual sessions, that are designed to assist with the embodiment and lived experience of mind-body methods as a regular part of one’s day-to-day living. Today, Kari blends coaching and counseling skills to offer Mind-Body Methods training in private, family and group sessions at Healing Pathways Medical Clinic, in West Sacramento, California. In addition, she offers sessions in private homes and in-nature; in outdoor settings, near the homes of her clients, to guide them in integrating the mind-body methods into their personal lifestyle.

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University

Saybrook University issues statement in support of the Occupy Movement

10/28/2011

On Friday, Oct. 28, Saybrook University issued the following statement:

Saybrook University's stated mission is to promote the creation of a more "humane, just and sustainable world." We call on local governments and the federal government to respect and support the Occupy movement protesters' rights of nonviolent speech and assembly.



Share your experience, opinion, and photos of the Occupy movement on the Saybrook Forum.

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University

Alumna Lyn Freeman launches new, revolutionary, technique for post-cancer recovery

10/21/2011

Lyn FreemanSaybrook Alumna Lyn Freeman has been one of the leading researchers on guided imagery as a healing technique.  In 2005 she received the first National Institutes of Health grant to study it as a method of support for cancer survivors.

Treatment for cancer can often leave survivors exhausted, depleted, and drained -- but modern medicine had little to offer them.  Freeman's research was designed to give them something to lead them back from "surviving" to "health."

Based on the Phase I and II results of her studies, the National Cancer Institute has directed Dr. Freeman’s company, Mind Matters Research, to make its therapeutic intervention available to cancer patients and survivors.

While the company is launching the program in Alaska, there is every possibility that it will grow nationally.  The Phase II grants Dr. Freeman received require Mind Matters Research to develop and clinically test their approach via tele-medicine and the web.

Dr. Freeman’s ENVISION Behavioral Medicine Intervention is one of a kind anywhere, relying on brain plasticity strategies that are imagery-based.

Strategies include imagery-driven biofeedback to assess and modify heart rate variability and temperature; art, storytelling, and sound to effect physiology and mood state; mind mapping memory practices; and many other therapies that are implemented and evaluated on a daily basis with cancer patients and survivors. Methods utilized are personalized depending on participant symptoms and response. The Intervention optimizes health promoting changes in physiology, biochemistry and mood state.

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University

Why do we think women aren't funny?

10/20/2011

We can prove that women are as funny as men -- we just don't believe it.

A new study showed that when a group of people were given jokes ... but didn't know who wrote them ... they found a statistically insignificant difference between jokes written by men and women.  '

But tell them who wrote the joke?  Suddenly the jokes by men are the ones that give them belly laughs.

This is a new study, but it's an old problem.  Last March Saybrook faculty member Steven Pritzker, a former Hollywood comedy writer, talked about how he'd only realized the contributions of women are ignored in the arts when he started editing The Encyclopedia of Creativity. 

He nailed the problem that researchers at the UC San Diego just identified.  The bad news -- it's been going on for centuries.  The good news?  It's getting better.

Read the interview here

Read the interview

 

 

 



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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Wilson Williams named to Board of Directors for the Museum of Women in the Arts

10/17/2011

Willson Williams, a member of Saybrook's psychology faculty, has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the New Mexico Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts brings recognition to the achievements of women artists of all periods and nationalities by exhibiting, preserving, acquiring, and researching art by women and by teaching the public about their accomplishments. To fulfill its mission, the museum cares for and displays a permanent collection, presents special exhibitions, conducts education programs, maintains a Library and Research Center, publishes a quarterly magazine and books on women artists, and supports a network of state and international committees. NMWA also serves as a center for the performing and literary arts and other creative disciplines.

The New Mexico Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts is involved in statewide and national art exhibitions, achievement awards, educational programs, sponsorship and lectures, and special events.

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University

Alumna Kaffia Jones promoted to Brigadier General

10/13/2011

Saybrook is pleased to announce that psychology alumna Colonel Kaffia Jones was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General on Sept. 10. 

The ceremony was held it Atlanta, Georgia, and attended by Brigadier General Jones’ immediate family, officers of the General corps, and enlisted servicemen and women.  Saybrook Faculty member Eugene Taylor was also in attendance. 

The ceremony was conducted by Major General Stuart M. Dyer, Commanding General of the 335th Signal Command (Theater), based in East Point, Georgia, where Colonel Jones served as Chief of Staff for two years.

Immediately following the ceremony, Brigadier General Jones left for a posting in the Middle East.  The 3200 Soldiers and civilians in her command build, operate, maintain, and defend the military computer network in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf.

As a Saybrook student, then Colonel Jones produced what Taylor called “an outstanding dissertation” entitled “Expatriate Warrior:  the experiences of World War II American veterans of African descent,” under faculty members Theopia Jackson, Zonya Johnson, and Charles Canaday. 

Jones earned her PhD in Psychology, graduating in 2010.

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Alumna Kaffia Jones promoted to Brigadier General

10/13/2011

Saybrook is pleased to announce that psychology alumna Colonel Kaffia Jones was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General on Sept. 10. 

The ceremony was held it Atlanta, Georgia, and attended by Brigadier General Jones’ immediate family, officers of the General corps, and enlisted servicemen and women.  Saybrook Faculty member Eugene Taylor was also in attendance. 

The ceremony was conducted by Major General Stuart M. Dyer, Commanding General of the 335th Signal Command (Theater), based in East Point, Georgia, where Colonel Jones served as Chief of Staff for two years.

Immediately following the ceremony, Brigadier General Jones left for a posting in the Middle East.  The 3200 Soldiers and civilians in her command build, operate, maintain, and defend the military computer network in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf.

As a Saybrook student, then Colonel Jones produced what Taylor called “an outstanding dissertation” entitled “Expatriate Warrior:  the experiences of World War II American veterans of African descent,” under faculty members Theopia Jackson, Zonya Johnson, and Charles Canaday. 

Jones earned her PhD in Psychology, graduating in 2010.

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University

Biscayne Institutes named among best in world for recovery from traumatic brain injury

10/06/2011

Photograph of Marie DiCowdenRecently The Biscayne Institutes of Health & Living, founded and directed by Saybrook Mind-Body Medicine faculty member Marie DiCowden, was named one of 16 best practices for community integration of individuals with brain injury out of 253 surveyed world wide by the Univeristy of Toronto for an upcomming publication.

The Biscayne Institute of Health & Living cares for hundreds of people, from young children to the elderly: it offers the community wellness programs, health education, integrative primary care programs, and rehabilitation; it has a school on premises to serve special needs children and youth so that their school and health care treatments are integrated at the same site; and they train graduate level health care providers from many disciplines in health care and integrative medicine.

"The idea is that we have a center where people don't just come when they're sick, but that provides for the needs of themselves, and their family, at all times," DiCowden says. "It's integrated into the school and the medical programs, and we have a number of activities that extend beyond physical or mental issues into health issue broadly."

Biscayne has also recently received the Florida State Surgeon General's Award Health  Innovation, Prevention and Management Award.

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University

The culture of Kodak: It's hard not to fall when you're on top of the world

10/04/2011

Early film Kodak is an iconic company – almost synonymous with film and photography. 

It may soon become synonymous with major collapse as well:   the epitome of a once invincible company that couldn’t keep up. 

In the wake of predictions that Kodak may file for bankruptcy, economists will likely go over the company’s business decisions for years to come.  But over at the Rethinking Complexity blog, Dennis Rebelo asks:  what if Kodak’s problems were cultural? 

Kodak reached a pinnacle where it could afford to be insular – and did.  “By sequestering itself, the organization created the anti-culture of success,” Rebelo writes. “The culture it carved out disabled "fresh," innovative thinking. Product development, for example, requires market engagement. Kodak didn't even attend the Consumer Electronic Show (or CES) until 2004—amazing evidence of their lack of consumer orientation.”

To prosper at the top, he suggests, companies and individuals must move from striving for security to finding value in creation and innovation for its own sake – a process Abraham Maslow called “Theory Z.”

It’s a fascinating essay.  Read it here

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