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New Existentialists

Embodied Racism

04/03/2014
Embodied Racism
“Racism is located in your body.” I first heard this stated when I was struggling with the realization that someone very important to me was having a difficult time accepting that I was engaged to a Black woman. As I was talking about how painful it was for me that this person, who I knew was a good person with strong character, could not seem to get past their prejudice, it was gently pointed out to me that, “Racism is located in your body. If it was just in one’s mind, it would be easy to overcome and change. But it is not easy, because racism is in our body.”...

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New Existentialists

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month

04/02/2014
April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month
There was a time when I was not aware that April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month. That changed when my husband, John, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) five years ago on March 31st—what he wishes had been an early “April Fools” joke but wasn’t. While we did not choose the PD journey, we have learned much about ourselves and from others in the process. The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (PDF) describes Parkinson’s disease as “a chronic and progressive movement disorder, meaning that symptoms continue and worsen over time.”...

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New Existentialists

A Fool for April’s Fool’s Day and Opening Day

04/01/2014
A Fool for April’s Fool’s Day and Opening Day
Today is April Fool’s Day. As a kid, I always hated April Fool’s Day because I didn’t to be the butt of the joke for fear of looking gullible or stupid. If I was going to participate in April Fool’s “merriment,” I was going to have to be the prankster, not the pranked. Yesterday was New York Mets Opening Day. What I love most about Opening Day—New York Mets Opening Day especially, since I’m a Mets fan, but it does apply to all teams and really all sports—is that all the slates are clean and the scales are balanced. For a brief moment in...

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Rethinking Complexity

The T-Summit

03/31/2014
The T-Summit
I recently attended a meeting at the Almaden Research Lab near San Jose, CA.  The T-Summit was jointly sponsored by Michigan State University's Collegiate Employment Research Institute and IBM's Global University Programs.  As described in the announcement about the meeting: Employers are placing increasing importance on competencies that allow young professionals to handle information from multiple sources, advance professional relationships across organizations, contribute innovatively to organizational practices, and communicate with...

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New Existentialists

Basis for Belief

03/31/2014
Basis for Belief
The world is full of partisan arguments these days. I watch them on Facebook, hear them in classrooms and hallways. Maybe people are more involved in politics than before, maybe it's just become a team sport in which only the most hardcore fans actually go out and vote for their team. But I hear this line, and it makes me wonder: I'm a _______________, so I believe ________________. I can't help thinking that the cart might be before the horse here. This statement is generally followed by something dogmatic and is sometimes hurtful or hateful. It is dogma by definition: you...

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Mind-Body Medicine

Firsts and Forgiveness in the Life of Mind-Body Medicine Doctoral Student, Deborah Gray

03/30/2014
Deborah Gray conducts workshop with Dr. Luskin on Forgiveness

 

A few weeks ago, in discussion with a friend, Saybrook School of Mind-Body Medicine doctoral student Deborah Gray found herself bemoaning the idea of aging.  She explained that she is not afraid or saddened by death but instead is grieving the loss of youth.  In the process of explaining her sadness, Deb realized what grieves her most is the loss of firsts.  “The first day of school, the first date, the first marriage, the first baby, etc.”   Deb further explained that, “As always, life has a way of challenging my beliefs.”          

Last week Deb had a wonderful opportunity to realize that her worries were for naught.  She was blessed with the opportunity for a number of new firsts; visiting Inuvik, Canada in the Arctic Circle, being a co-presenter with Dr. Fred Luskin, Director of the Stanford Forgiveness Project, tasting caribou stew, flying Canadian North Airlines (tagline, “Seriously North”).  Lastly, she got her first marriage proposal from a homeless man while visiting the local homeless shelter in Inuvik.

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New Existentialists

Existential Roundup

03/28/2014
Existential Roundup
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Last week, this column discussed the start of Spring and rebirth of life in the yearly cycle. Appropriate to the season, Pamela Gwyn Kripke provides a lovely reflection on the value of a single life—that of a poisonous toad—in a column she wrote for The New York Times entitled “The Value of Life—Though Tiny and Toxic.” We can learn much from her experiences with Skip. Those of us who...

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New Existentialists

When Success Is Failure

03/27/2014
When Success Is Failure
Western thinking has done an incredible job of convoluting success. As a society, we have come to accept the idea that success is limited to those who finish first. If you did not win the gold medal, or make the most money, or have the best grades, you are not successful. In fact, as a society, we have accepted the norm that anyone who does not finish first is a loser, a failure, a dud, or maybe even a has-been. This line of thinking has invaded every aspect of our culture—education, sports, business, government, military, healthcare, and even religion. You must finish on top—...

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Rethinking Complexity

A Workplace Without Borders, Part 2

03/27/2014
A Workplace Without Borders, Part 2
Overtime people across the world have self-organized themselves in a variety of ways. There are tribes, villages, towns and cities. Then there are city-states, nation states and even empires. All have cultures, even sub-cultures that make them distinctive and give them an identity. They have borders that create separation and avenues of commerce that promote their economies. Emerging now is a global village, a complex interdependent society comprised of nations and ethnicities that span the world. It draws upon a global intercultural workplace for organizational operations and social well-...

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Rethinking Complexity

Shifting From International to Inter-Cultural Global Manager

03/27/2014
Shifting From International to Inter-Cultural Global Manager
Over the last five decades, while business contexts were evolving from national to international to transnational and now to global, workplace environments were shifting from “control-oriented” hierarchies to interactive teams to social networking ecologies. Such shifts in perspectives, accompanied by innovations in digital-based information and communication systems, have led to dramatic changes in business models, supply chain management, and marketplace dynamics. All of these developments are radically changing management approaches, how organizational operations are conducted...

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