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Moral Courage, nonviolence, and peace in rural Columbia

07/16/2011

Marc Pilisuk, who teaches in Saybrook's Social Transformation program, will speak on "Moral Courage, Nonviolence, and Peace  Communities in Rural Columbia" on Wednesday, July 20. 

Dr. Pilisuk is one of the leading scholars of peace in the world today.  He is the editor of the recently published three volume anthology  Peace Movements World Wide, the most extensive study of the global peace movement ever developed.  He is also the 2010 winner of the Society of Psychologists for the Study of Social Issues’ Distinguished Service Award, and its 2011 award for teaching.   

  • What:  Marc Pilisuk on "Moral Courage,  Nonviolence and Peace Communities in Rural Colombia."
  • Where:  UC Berkeley, 210 Wheeler
  • When:  3 p.m. on Wednesday, July 20

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Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Moral courage, nonviolence, and peace in rural Columbia

07/16/2011

Marc Pilisuk, who teaches in Saybrook's Social Transformation program, will speak on "Moral Courage, Nonviolence, and Peace  Communities in Rural Columbia" on Wednesday, July 20. 

Dr. Pilisuk is one of the leading scholars of peace in the world today.  He is the editor of the recently published three volume anthology  Peace Movements World Wide, the most extensive study of the global peace movement ever developed.  He is also the 2010 winner of the Society of Psychologists for the Study of Social Issues’ Distinguished Service Award, and its 2011 award for teaching.   

  • What:  Marc Pilisuk on "Moral Courage,  Nonviolence and Peace Communities in Rural Colombia."
  • Where:  UC Berkeley, 210 Wheeler
  • When:  3 p.m. on Wednesday, July 20

Continue Reading

Events

Moral Courage, nonviolence, and peace in rural Columbia

07/16/2011

Marc Pilisuk, who teaches in Saybrook's Social Transformation program, will speak on "Moral Courage, Nonviolence, and Peace  Communities in Rural Columbia" on Wednesday, July 20. 

Dr. Pilisuk is one of the leading scholars of peace in the world today.  He is the editor of the recently published three volume anthology  Peace Movements World Wide, the most extensive study of the global peace movement ever developed.  He is also the 2010 winner of the Society of Psychologists for the Study of Social Issues’ Distinguished Service Award, and its 2011 award for teaching.   

  • What:  Marc Pilisuk on "Moral Courage,  Nonviolence and Peace Communities in Rural Colombia."
  • Where:  UC Berkeley, 210 Wheeler
  • When:  3 p.m. on Wednesday, July 20

 

Continue Reading

LIOS

The Overwhelming Life of a LIOS Graduate Student

07/15/2011

by Marcus Berley
LIOS student

Marcus-and-Tammy Life as a graduate student is often overwhelming.  Take a busy schedule, limited finances, and a daunting reading list, and add in whatever major life transition you are experiencing at the moment, such as a divorce, a death in the family, or a newborn baby.  Now, go write a sound, well-referenced, and creative academic paper.

What makes LIOS different from other graduate school programs is that, in addition to balancing a busy life, it challenges students to explore who we are and where we come from.  What question have you always wanted—but been too afraid—to ask your mother?  What are the rules of your family, and what role do you play?  What cultural biases have crept into the crevices of your way of thinking?  Well, your homework is to go ask those questions.  To your parents.  To your aunts and uncles.  To your grandparents.  Take all of that newly acquired systemic knowledge and apply it to yourself and your most intimate relationships. 

Not terrifying enough for you?  Well, you’re only reading about it, possibly imagining it, but not actually experiencing it.  LIOS is all about experiencing.  The theories you read make so much sense on paper, but watch what happens to your insides as you study group theory in a group that is studying itself.  Your mind jerks.  You scramble to figure out what is going on.  Your heart cracks open.  A teacher asks you if you have a tendency to avoid conflict, then challenges you to try another method with a conflict that you currently have with another student.  Throughout all of this you’re being evaluated on a wide range of skills you’re supposed to be developing.  Oh yeah, and it’s ok to cry.

Somehow, you’re doing it.  You read and you write papers, and you tell your mother that, even though things have gotten complicated, you love her.  You move apartments and split up with your partner or find a new one, you find an internship or a project, and you don’t have much time to look around.  It’s graduate school.  It’s overwhelming. 

And going through it is wonderful preparation for life as a sound, creative professional.

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Mind-Body Medicine

Mind-Body Medicine program applications still open

07/13/2011

Begin a Degree in Mind Body Medicine this Fall!

If you are interested in pursuing a degree or certificate program in Mind Body Medicine, there is still time to be admitted for the Fall 2011 term. 

Applying is easy!

1)  Fill out our online application form.

2)  Write your personal statement

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus David Sortino, PhD '98 Releases New Publication The Promised Cookie: No Longer Angry Children

07/13/2011
Click Here to see information about The Promised Cookie: No Longer Angry Children Also available at Amazon.com

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Events

Begin a Degree in Mind Body Medicine this Fall!

07/12/2011

Begin a Degree in Mind Body Medicine this Fall!

If you are interested in pursuing a degree or certificate program in Mind Body Medicine, there is still time to be admitted for the Fall 2011 term. 

Applying is easy!

1)  Fill out our online application form.

2)  Write your personal statement

3)  Send us your documentation (academic transcripts, letters of recommendation, etc.).

That's it!

The online New Student Orientation will take place August 20 and August 21 (entirely online and each day will start around 9:00am Pacific time and end around 5PM Pacific time). The first day of the Fall Semester 2011 Term A is August 22.  For the Fall Semester 2011, the Residential Conference will take place from September 30, 2011 until October 5, 2011 in Arlington, VA at the Crystal City Hyatt Regency. 

 **The residential components of Saybrook’s MBM program are mandatory in their entirety including one Residential Orientation upon admittance and additional Residential Conferences per year.** 

Ready to begin?  Have questions?  Email Faiza in Admissions at fbukhari@saybrook.edu or call her at 800-825-4480 ext. 1255

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Steve Wolf, PhD '86 Offers Taming Your Anger Training

07/12/2011
DO YOU HAVE ANY ANGRY AGGRESSIVE CLIENTS? Dear Colleague: I am a Clinical Psychologist with a West LA private practice for 25 years. After co-authoring "Romancing The Shadow", I developed the Taming Your Anger training program (www.tamingyouranger.com) to help hard core "two-strikers" on parole who wanted to control their anger to avoid a third strike. Over the past year, I have taught at...

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University

Is your organization neurotic? Maybe it needs therapy.

07/12/2011

Freud's Sofa Anybody who’s worked for an organization knows it can be … well … neurotic.

Organizations have tics, and blind spots, and habits, just like people do.  So maybe it’s not surprising, in fact it’s brilliant, to apply psychological processes to organizations. 

At the blog Rethinking Complexity, Jorge Taborga examines a Depth Psychology model of organizations, based on the work of Carl Jung.

“The organizational unconscious,” he writes, “is the unique array of ‘energies, contents and truths’ that operate beyond the conscious control of the organization.  It is the bridge between the conscious organization and the collective unconscious.  It provides the psychodynamic environment for these two forces to interplay.”

All of which is to say that organizations have complexes of which they’re not aware;  things that they channel their energies into, without realizing it, that might be neurotic or actively hurtful. 

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University

Existentialism, psychoanalysis ... and the tragedy of life

07/08/2011

An essay on The New Existentialists suggests why ideas like existentialism and psychoanalysis -- once mainstayes of Western culture -- suddenly fell out of favor.  

Existentialism and psychoanalysis both view human life as containing tragic elements and hard limits -- we are free, but we can't have everything we want.  According to Carlo Strenger, of Tel Aviv University:   “The tragic dimension (of life) is no longer popular in our culture that perpetuates the myth of ‘just-do-it,’ and repeats the mantra that happiness is a birthright.”

As long as our culture denies life's tragic elements, as long as our science refuses to acknowledge that there may be any limits to our eventual mastery over life (we'll eventually develope Artificial Intelligence ... we'll eventually understand how "mind" reduces to "brain chemicals" ... we'll eventually prolong human life indefinitely and download our consciousness and reach "the singularity" and all you have to do is click your ruby slippers together three times and believe ...) then philosophies that teach us how to live with and through the human condition - however true and useful - will seem out of touch with a culture of Hollywood endings.

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