The Saybrook Forum

Posts

University

Is William James a "philosopher for the new century" two centuries in a row?

07/12/2010

That's the question the Saybrook Forum asked psychology faculty member Eugene Taylor, an internationally renowned scholar on the life and work of William James, after the question was raised by the The New Humanist magazine.  His response is below. 

William James: Still One Hundred and Fifty Years Ahead of His Time

In a thoughtful article recently published in The New Humanist [125:4, July/August 2010],  Jonathan Raée extols the attributes of his favorite philosopher-psychologist, William James. He was the only enduring figure, according to Raée, who did not get bogged down in details , and did not take a megalomaniacal stance toward his own ideas. We should resurrect his memory and seek to emulate the now forgotten direction he was always pointing us towards—world peace through a strengthening of our own inward character.

I should say that Mr. Raée as a writer is himself on the right track. Briefly, we may review here only a few of James’s prescient insights into our uniquely American and humanistically oriented legacy, and at the same time we might widen even more for the reader the scope of James’s thinking about our future.

Continue Reading

University

A sustainable globe depends on local leadership

07/12/2010

Often problems at the global level are so big, with so many stakeholders, as to be intractable:  but at the local level, says Organizational Systems chair Nancy Southern, individuals and organizations are proving that they provide exactly the kind of solutions our world needs.  Read more in her recent Triple-Pundit article.

Continue Reading

University

Art with impact

07/12/2010

After a two year hiatus, Saybrook is thrilled to announce the return of its certificate in Expressive Arts for Healing and Social Change, taught by a group of renowned experts including Natalie Rogers, a member of Saybrook’s Distinguished Consulting Faculty, who created the program.

Developed by Rogers out of the person-centered approach pioneered by her father, legendary therapist Carl Rogers, this certificate program is open to anyone wishing to learn how to use the person-centered approach and expressive arts in counseling, education, mediation, social work, nursing, social action, group facilitation, and workplace psychology - or to awaken personal growth and creativity.

Saybrook’s program, according to Rogers, is the only expressive arts program in the country grounded in Carl Roger’s values and philosophy.

That’s a distinction that graduates of the program say makes a difference.

Continue Reading

University

Center for Mind-Body Medicine offers training courses

07/12/2010

The Center for Mind-Body Medicine in Washington, D.C., Saybrook University’s partner institution in its groundbreaking Graduate College of Mind-Body Medicine, will hold it’s Mind-Body Medicine Professional Training Program this October. 

Utilizing a small group approach, this five day program will focus on the scientific basis for mind-body medicine and explore a range of the most effective tools for self-care and stress management, including:
• meditation
• guided imagery
• biofeedback & autogenic training
• breathing & movement
• self expression through words and drawings

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Book by Alumnus Christopher Ryan, Ph.D. '03 Featured on Salon.com

07/12/2010
See article featuring publication by Alumnus Christopher Ryan, PhD '03 at link below: http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2010/06/27/sex_at_dawn_interview/index.html

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Alumna Deirdre Bundy, M.A. '09 Needs help with Workshop in L.A. - San Diego Area to Empower Young Women

07/12/2010
Dear Saybrook Community: I wanted to let you know about some news for the business I am creating, Little Ladies Sports Club, and also see if you would be able to help us. My business partner and I have decided to start up an LLSC workshop and are in the process of creating and picking a venue! Would you happen to know any parents with daughters aged 11-18 years old in the LA or San Diego areas...

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Alumna Kathrina L. Rashid, PhD ('09) was Interviewed During Sexual Assault Awareness Month

07/06/2010
San Francisco Bay Area Alumna Kathrina L. Rashid, PhD '09 conducted an interview on Blogtalk Radio in April for Sexual Assault Awareness Month Kathrina gave the interview as a Board Member of Bay Area Women Against Rape(BAWAR), which is the nation's very first rape crisis hotline. In the wide-ranging interview, she also discussed her dissertation study conducted at Saybrook, and briefly...

Continue Reading

University

First chess, now music: just how creative can computers get?

06/07/2010

"Nobody’s original," says composer David Cope.

Here’s what he means: there’s no such thing as "creativity," only endless copying, theme, and variation. "Everybody copies from everybody. The skill is in how large a fragment you choose to copy and how elegantly you can put them together."

Cope is making more than just an argument with the idea that "nobody’s original" – he’s making music. Cope is the world’s foremost creator of computer programs that compose classical music, and his latest program, called "Emily Howell," recently released its first album. In several cases, classical music scholars have been unable to tell an artificial intelligence created work in the style of Bach or Mozart from the original.

That music, Cope says, is proof that creativity, as we commonly understand it, does not exist – and that people are therefore little more than complex machines constantly crunching algorithms.

"The question," Cope says in a recent article in Miller-McCune,"isn’t whether computers have a soul, but whether humans have a soul." His answer is "no."

But what exactly has Cope proved? Very little, according to faculty in Saybrook’s program in Creativity Studies.

Continue Reading

University

Meet "the Market" - a God for the 21st century

06/07/2010

How many times have you heard someone talking about a major policy ask: "How is the market going to respond?"

Or heard someone say that a social problem will be taken care of "if we let the market work?" Or heard that our society is in trouble because "the market lost confidence."

These statements refer, of course, to the financial markets – but in a provocative article in the London Guardian, Aditya Chakrabortty asked: if you substitute "God" for "the market" in all of these statements, doesn’t it make about as much sense?

In fact, said Chakrabortty, isn’t this a pretty good indication that "The Market" has become the Western society’s religion?

After all, we have faith in it, and in its power to perform miracles and bestow prosperity, even if we don’t really understand how.  We ask if "the market" will like something, or how "the market" will react, when we try to decide whether or not to do something. 
 
And, when you think about it, the market has a priestly class, temples, and orthodox doctrines, too.

Is Chakrabortt right?

We asked Alan Vaughan, a Jungian analyst and psychology faculty member in Saybrook’s PsyD program who studies both the psychology of global capitalism and the transmission of religions across cultures, to weigh in.

His response is below.

Continue Reading

University

The five stages of coping with sustainability

06/07/2010

We all know we should eat right and exercise, but most of us don’t – and it’s not because we don’t understand the science.

The same dynamic works with sustainability initiatives at even the most progressive companies, according to Dennis Jaffe: going green can be more challenging emotionally than it is intellectually. Companies that don’t take this into account are often headed for trouble.

Read more in his recent Triple Pundit article.

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus