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Saybrook Alumna Marie Fonrose Receives Praise From Colleague in Haiti

04/02/2010
During her tour of service in Haiti, Marie spent her final week in the province known as "Zoranger" in Bainet, located in the Southern part of the country. She was working with the victims and teachers of a 501c3 school and clinic. This was the first school and clinic established in the area. In the words of Lionel Adams of the Hope for Haiti Foundation: Julie and I were blessed to have with us...

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook Student Section To Be Added to The June RC Alumni Publications Display

04/01/2010
Each year during the June RC, the Alumni Association displays publications by our Alumni. During this year’s RC, we will add a Saybrook student publication section. Students who wish to display their books should send a copy/copies of your book(s) to the following address: Saybrook Alumni Association Saybrook University Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies 747 Front Street...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Scott Kiser, PhD '09 and Executive Faculty Member Tom Greening Seek Aid in Existential Research Project

04/01/2010
Tom Greening, PhD and Scott Kiser, PhD seek funding for work on a research project in preparation for a presentation at the 2010 APA convention. They are collaborating to further develop an assessment instrument created by Dr. Greening, the Existential Orientation Survey (EOS), so that it can be published and marketed for research and professional use. The EOS identifies four essential...

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Meet Saybrook's New President

03/31/2010

Earlier this month the Saybrook Board of Trustees unanimously selected Mark Schulman to serve as Saybrook’s next president.  Currently serving as President of Goddard College in Vermont and Washington, whose endowment he has tripled while increasing its enrollment, Mark has also served as President and Professor of Humanities at Antioch University Southern California; and Academic Vice President, Dean of the College, and Associate Professor at Pacific Oaks College (California and Washington). He has held faculty positions at the New School for Social Research (New York), City College of New York, Saint Mary’s College of California, and others.

Mark received his PhD in Communications from the Union Institute and has consulted and published extensively on higher education and communications strategies and issues.

He spoke with the Saybrook Forum last week.  The following is an edited transcript of that interview.

SAYBROOK FORUM:  Your degrees are in, in this order:  literature (for undergrad); instructional systems technology (as an MS); and communications (for a PhD).  Intellectually, what was the path from one to the next?  How did you get from there to here? 

MARK SCHULMAN:  “Ever since high school I’d been a print journalist, and I’d always been interested in underground media, alternative media.  In fact I put together an underground paper in high school and got in trouble with the administration because they didn’t like some of the words in it. By the time I got to college there were a lot of things involving communications as a field of study that I was interested in. As an undergraduate, I did a lot of work in film, and was very involved in it, and I was still involved in print journalism, but at the time these were all subsumed under the field of ‘literature’ as a major.  So I majored in ‘literature’ at Antioch in order to do all of that. 

The opportunity to go to Indiana University (for an MS) came in a time when jargon was accelerating – do you remember when trash collectors were being called ‘sanitation engineers?’ – and so while I was technically going to school for ‘instructional systems technology,’ what I was really interested in was educational media.  Communications again.  That’s what I was studying.  Among other things, getting this degree gave me access to equipment so that I could do my own media work.  Very practical, hands on, work - that was what I was passionate about doing.  And I did that, but then I just kind of got the bug to be a teacher, and then an administrator in the sense of setting up programs, and got more and more into communications as a department, as a field.

After about 10 years of doing that I decided to go to Union Institute, which is somewhat similar to Saybrook in its focus on the learner (that was extremely important to me) because over time I’d become much more involved in scholarship in the theory of communications.  So I did a lot of interesting work in communications theory, sort of tying everything I’d been doing together while working on neighborhood radio, and I put a non-profit low power radio station on the air for Harlem, and this was part of the new emerging field of community communication. 

So the thread between them is using media and working in media, which then became transformed into thinking about media and being engaged in media studies in a scholarly way, and then finally putting programs together for media in a scholarly context and institution.

At a couple of different points in my life I’d actually considered going into print journalism as a career - I’d always been interested in combining the skills of journalism with a commitment of social justice - and sometimes I do wonder if I made the right move going into education.  I really do love working in journalism and working with media.”

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Civilizing the Economy: what we can do if the myths of capitalism don't add up to the facts

03/31/2010

If you want to prove capitalism works, you might think back to 18th century Glasgow.  That’s where Adam Smith was when he created the theory of market capitalism – he looked around, saw open markets, saw competition, saw the industriousness and prosperity that resulted, and correctly concluded that a system of free markets based on competition benefits everyone.

Everyone, that is, except the slaves.

Because what Smith’s famous example leaves out is the fact that Scotland’s prosperity was the result not just of free markets, but of slaves in the Americas producing tobacco that could be shipped to Scotland for processing.  Without the slaves, the system wouldn’t have worked.

Smith knew it, too.  He roundly condemned slavery as an evil thing in his moral writings, but simply considered it part of doing business in his economic writings – prosperity trumped human rights, because economics has nothing to do with morality.

That’s the finding of Saybrook faculty member Marvin Brown’s provocative new book Civilizing the Economy: A New Economics of Provision. “When he’s talking about slavery in his economic works, slavery is an economic issue, and when he’s writing his moral treatises, it’s a moral issue, and he never connects the two,” Brown says. “And we’re still seeing that disconnect today.  We’re living it.  It’s at the very basis of our identity.”

The implications for capitalism are enormous.

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Alison Shapiro to present at annual "Mini Medicial School" at Pacific Medical Center

03/31/2010

The California Pacific Medical Center’s Institute for Health and Healing in San Francisco will be holding its annual “Mini Medical School” on Wednesdays in April, and the Chair of Saybrook’s Board of Trustees, Alison Shapiro, will be one of the featured speakers.

The free lecture series will explore the brain — from neuroplasticity and emotions to brain injury and aging. Nationally renowned experts will share how to keep the brain active and vital, and reveal the brain’s remarkable capacity to regenerate and adapt.

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Eugene Taylor to deliver opening address at science of consciousness conference

03/31/2010

Eugene Taylor, director of the Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology concentration at Saybrook’s Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic, will deliver the opening address of the first Plenary session of the annual “Toward a Science of Consciousness” conference, April 11 - 17, in Tucson, Arizona.  

Preconference workshops begin on the 12th, and the opening session is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on April 13th.

A historian, philosopher of psychology, and internationally recognized scholar on the life and work of William James, Taylor’s presentation will be called “Could Radical Empiricism Guide Neurophenomenology as the Future of Neuroscience?”

For more information visit http://www.consciousness.arizona.edu/.

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Marc Pilisuk to speak at conference about revisiting the military-industrial complex

03/31/2010

Marc Pilisuk, a Human Sciences faculty member at Saybrook’s Graduate School of Psychology and Humanistic Studies, will be speaking on the implications of war and military spending at a conference at Purdue University.

The conference, “Revisiting the Idea of the Military Industrial Complex,” will be held on April 9th, and be divided into two parts.  The first will involve Pilisuk, the author of more than 140 articles on conflict and its resolution, discussing his book Who Benefits from Global Violence and War?

The second will consist of a panel of experts local to Purdue on the impact of war and military spending.
The event is free and open to the public – it will be held in Room 206 of Stewart Center, on Purdue’s West Lafayette, Indiana, campus.

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Saybrook Dialogues commence in April

03/31/2010

The Saybrook Dialogues, an in-depth examination of topical issues facing the world today, kicks off Thursday, April 1, with additional Dialogues scheduled on April 21 and June 10.

All programs are held at Saybrook’s San Francisco campus, 747 Front Street.  Dialogues begin at 7 p.m..

April 1 Dialogue: Leading in the Midst of Change

As leaders (and we are all leaders) our opportunity and challenge is to embrace change, to understand change, and to lead change - within ourselves, our lives, our organizations. This Saybrook Dialogue will focus on tools and practices for leading, and thriving in the midst of change.

Dialogue Leaders

   Bob Andrews, Director of Executive Coaching for Gap Inc.
   Jackie McGrath, Executive Coach

April 21 Dialogue: Appreciative Leadership: Turning Creative Potential into Positive Power

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook Alumnus Douglas Beckwith, PhD '07 Directs Program in Learning Technology

03/23/2010
Rising from the Ashes of First-Year Programs Douglas Beckwith, Dean and Executive Director, University of Phoenix In early 2010, the University of Phoenix and Axia College launched an innovative new ‘First Year Sequence’ for all incoming students. This 24-unit sequence of eight courses presents a gradual introduction to the complexity of learning technology. They will learn how this...

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