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Discuss "What Matters Most" with James Hollis and Donald Moss

12/11/2009

How do we live fulfilling lives? What is most important for spiritual, mental, and physical well being? 

Begin the new year with perspectives on these vital and intriguing questions with: James Hollis, PhD, noted Jungian analyst and author, and Donald Moss, PhD, existential health psychologist and Mind-Body Medicine scholar.

Jim Hollis, Director of Saybrook University’s Jungian Studies program, will speak on themes from his latest book, What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life. Its premise: “We are here to be eccentric, different, perhaps strange, perhaps merely to add to our small piece, our little clunky, chunky selves, to the great mosaic of being.”

Don Moss, Chair of Saybrook’s Mind-Body Medicine program and editor of Handbook of Mind Body Medicine for Primary Care, will reflect upon what matters most with the perspective of his work in psychology and integrative health.  His current book in process, Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health, explores the relationship between losing one’s path in life and the development of illness.

Join us after the presentation and learn about our graduate programs in Jungian Studies (with residential options in San Francisco and Houston) and Mind-Body Medicine.

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University

The philosopher and the Nazi

11/30/2009

Martin Heidegger is sometimes thought to be one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century – and a critical figure in the foundation of existentialism. 

He was also a Nazi.

For decades, his defenders have contended that he was a major philosopher, but only a minor Nazi – a member of the party for only a year, and an unwilling accomplice. 

But what if that isn’t true? 

Several new publications, some with new evidence, are suggesting that Heidegger was a more enthusiastic Nazi than he ever admitted, and his defenders ever knew. 

But more than Heidegger the person, they’re suggesting that Heidegger the philosopher is also suspect.

“Drawing on new evidence, the author, Emmanuel Faye, argues fascist and racist ideas are so woven into the fabric of Heidegger’s theories that they no longer deserve to be called philosophy,” Patricia Cohen writes in the New York Times.  “As a result Mr. Faye declares, Heidegger’s works and the many fields built on them need to be re-examined lest they spread sinister ideas as dangerous to modern thought as ‘the Nazi movement was to the physical existence of the exterminated peoples.”’

Intellectually speaking, those are fighting words – and the issue is one with which some Saybrook community members, as students and practitioners of existential psychology, are grappling.

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University

War is harder on soldiers who kill

11/30/2009

Soldiers are no less human for wearing a uniform, and so perhaps it’s not surprising that new research shows that soldiers who kill tend to have far more difficult lives than soldiers who don’t. 

That’s the conclusion of a new report produced on Vietnam Veterans by UC San Francisco and the VA Medical center.  Even compared to other combat veterans, soldiers who killed (or think they killed) are more likely to suffer long-term from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, depression, violent behavior, and other psychological problems. 

To Stanley Krippner, a psychology faculty member at Saybrook and co-author of the book Haunted by Combat, this isn’t a surprise:  treating traumatic situation in a “one-size fits all” kind of way will never account for the unique experiences each soldier takes back with them from battle.  However you slice it, killing someone is not like being shot at - no two experiences are the same.

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University

Japan and San Francisco - the existential connection

11/30/2009

 Yes, Europe played a role, but to Kingo Matsuda America is the “origin of psychotherapy” – especially person-centered therapy.

That’s why Kingo, the Director of the Overseas Department for the Academy of Counselors Japan, was at Saybrook this month with 15 students.  Together they went through training in humanistic and existential therapy provided by leading experts on the Saybrook faculty, including Kirk Schneider and Charles Cannady. 

Since 2004 Saybrook has worked with the Academy of Counselors Japan to give its students, who will upon graduation be front line therapists and counselors in that country, a strong grounding in existential-humanistic approaches

Saybrook, Kingo says, has that expertise – although ironically person-centered approaches to therapy may be more popular in Japan than in the U.S..

“Person-centered is very popular in Japan,” says Kingo.  “However, they have never had anything like existential therapy or gestalt therapy.  So they can expand their knowledge here, and bring it back to Japan and as a counselor their insight is expanded.  They can expand their insight.”

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University

The advantage of unprocessed foods

11/30/2009

Nutrition is an often overlooked component of mind-body medicine – it doesn’t have the glitz of hypnosis or the hipness of biofeedback.  But it’s basic:  what you decide to put in your body today has a major impact on your health tomorrow. 

Just ask Beverly Rubik.  A faculty member of Saybrook’s College of Mind-Body Medicine and the Director of the Institute for Frontier Science, Rubik is frequently called upon to perform evaluations of health products or regimens, and has recently completed a study on the impact of processed foods on health. 
Two words:  not good.

In a recent study of the impact of processed foods, Rubik compared fresh blood samples (taken under optimal fasting conditions) of subjects who eat processed foods (including organic) with subjects who do not (in this case, followers of the Weston A. Price diet) for at least two years.  The subjects were all healthy adults from 25 to 81 years old, matched for age. 

Using a microscopic technique known as dark-field live blood analysis, she observed that the blood cells of those on the Weston A Price diet aggregated and clotted much less than the blood cells of those on conventional modern diets, even hours after the blood samples were drawn.  

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Alumni Messenger

Alumni Job Opportunities Around the Country

11/17/2009
Click here to see the latest alumni job opportunities around the country This listing will typically be one of the first blog entries on this site in the forseeable future. Keep us posted if you know of jobs that might be interesting to alumni, and we will post these jobs under this blog heading in the future. Email: SaybrookAlumniAssociation@Saybrook.edu

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Alumni Messenger

Education Jobs In Washington State

11/11/2009
Considered a career at the University of Washington: Opportunity to informally meet and network with UW employment recruiters. Staff from UW Human Resources will be on hand to discuss the benefits of working at the UW and the variety of positions available. This event is hosted by the UW offices of Minority Affairs and Diversity and Human Resources. Event: Discover a Unique World of Opportunities...

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Alumni Messenger

5-year Postdoctoral Scholarships Available in the Humanities and Social Sciences

11/11/2009
5-year Postdoctoral Scholarships in the Humanities and Social Sciences Deadline: 2010-01-31 Description: POLONSKY POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS The Van Leer Jerusalem Institute proposes to award two Polonsky Postdoctoral Fellowships, in any field of the Humanities or Social Sciences, for a period of up to five years, beginning October 1, 2010. The Fellowships offer an annual stipend ......

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Bob Hieronimus, PhD '81 Presents Art Work at the Baltimore Symbolic Art and Music Telesma

11/11/2009
Alumnus Bob Hieronimus, PhD '81 presents: One People, One Planet… Hon!, on Lost Symbols Found, with a concert by the transformative Baltimore band Telesma Saturday, 14th of November, 8 PM Windup Space, 12 W. North Ave Baltimore, in the newly revitalized Station North Arts and Entertainment District Consider buying some tickets and giving them to the younger people in your lives,...

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University

"Smart pills" have stupid problems

11/11/2009

An avalanche starts with a single pebble, and scientists are now warning us that they’re seeing the next social avalanche begin:  the age of neuro-enhancers … pills to make us smarter … is here.

You see it in large numbers of college students taking the stimulant Adderall to do better on term papers.  You see it in pilots and doctors and taxi drivers who work long shifts taking Ritalin to help them concentrate.  You see it in the promise of new drugs that will even further enhance “mental performance.” 

An informal poll conducted last year by the journal Nature found that one in five readers of that scientific publication had taken drugs off-label to improve “their focus, concentration, or memory” – and a third said they would likely give “smart drugs” to their kids if they learned that other parents were doing so.

Call it neuro-enhancement, call it “cosmetic neurology,” call it drug addiction – but in the future, we’re warned, if you’re not popping pills to make you smarter, then you’ll be left behind.

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