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PRINTMAKING & VISUAL ARTS BASED INQUIRY W/ Arne Collen in Florence, Italy

12/14/2009
Special announcement from Arne Collen: PRINTMAKING & VISUAL ARTS BASED INQUIRY MAY 3-18, 2010 in FLORENCE, ITALY with Ron Pokrasso, David Hoptman, and Arne Collen SANTA REPARATA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL of ART It is with great excitement that I am able to send you this special announcement of the forthcoming two week art workshop in Florence, Italy. After having taken this workshop under the...

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Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Greg Bogart, PhD '92 Releases Book on Dreamwork and Self-Healing

12/14/2009
Greg Bogart, Ph.D, MFT, Saybrook class of 1992, has just released a new book, Dreamwork and Self-Healing: Unfolding the Symbols of the Unconscious, published by Karnac Books (London). This book explores therapeutic dreamwork, archetypal themes and complexes, symbols such as the ouroboros, king, puer, wounded healer, and cross-gender imagery. The author shows that dreamwork is a natural...

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Alumni Messenger

Saybrook University Website Now Online

12/14/2009
http://www.saybrook.eduThe New Saybrook University Website is Now Online Click Here: Saybrook University Website

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Alumni Messenger

“What Matters Most…” Perspectives on Life’s Fundamental Questions

12/14/2009
“What Matters Most…” Perspectives on Life’s Fundamental Questions Thursday, January 14, 2010 7:00 - 9:00 PM James Hollis, PhD, noted Jungian analyst and author and Donald Moss, PhD, psychologist and leading Mind-Body Medicine scholar How do we live fulfilling lives? What is most important for spiritual, mental, and physical well being? Begin the new year with...

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Alumni Messenger

Celebrate the New Saybrook University, JAN 15, 2010

12/14/2009
Celebrate the New Saybrook University Friday January 15, 2010 7PM - 10PM Westin San Francisco Airport Hotel Bayshore Ballroom See the SAVE THE DATE Notice

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Alumni Messenger

Melanie Joy, PhD '03 Releases New Book

12/14/2009
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_0_16?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=why+we+love+dogs+eat+pigs+and+wear+cows&sprefix=why+we+love+dogsMelanie Joy, PhD '03 has just published Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows Available at Amazon.com "Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows is an eye-opening account of a little-questioned article of faith in our culture: the idea...

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Alumni Messenger

Pacific Graduate School of Psychology is Hiring Faculty Members

12/14/2009
Pacific Graduate School of Psychology at Palo Alto University is hiring several faculty members see attached (also see APA Monitor ad http://jobs.psyccareers.com/jobdetail.cfm?job=3245253 ). PGSP has an active LGBTQ Program, including active recruitment of students, specialized class work, the Center for LGBTQ Evidence-based Applied Research, and a dedicated unit within our training clinic for...

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University

Good businesses; great reputations; very bad decisions

12/11/2009

The economy is still in a shambles after many of the world’s most prominent firms engaged in financial shenanigans that a sixth grader could see through – so maybe we shouldn’t be surprised by a new study showing that there’s a strong correlation between a corporation’s prominence and its willingness to break the law.  

The study is presented in the Academy of Management Journal.  Of the 469 incidents of illegal activity sampled in the study, 382 (81 percent) were committed by firms on Fortune magazine’s “Most Admired Companies” list and were considered “high performing.”

Why?  According to a review of the study “It's not that poor firms necessarily have more scruples or that prominent, high-performing companies are inherently evil (or that Fortune magazine is playing a cruel joke on its readers), but that management teams at more prominent firms feel more pressure to do something — anything — to increase the bottom line and maintain their preeminent position.”

It is, in other words, the nature of the system:  the more successful a company is, the more it’s pressured to outperform expectations, and that leads to increasing pressure to cut moral corners. 

Marvin Brown, a respected business ethicist and member of Saybrook’s Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies Organizational Systems faculty, says that the very foundation of capitalism as we understand it – going back to Adam Smith – involves turning a blind eye to the ethical questions involved in corporate success.

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University

How not to grow old in the 21st century

12/11/2009

There may never have been a worse time to grow old than the 21st century. 

That’s the contention of MIT computer scientist Philip Greenspun, who recently suggested in his blog that a combination of modern technology and new prejudices “reduces the value of old people.”

“An old person will know more than a young person, but can any person, young or old, know as much as Google and Wikipedia?” Greenspun asks. “Why would a young person ask an elder the answer to a fact question that can be solved authoritatively in 10 seconds with a Web search?”

Worse is the fact that the skills that it takes a lifetime to develop are now rendered obsolete within years by new innovations in technology – meaning that the young often know more than the elderly about how to get by in the world.  This, Greenspun suggests, has never before happened in human culture.

As for wisdom?  Greenspun doesn’t discount it, but says that there’s a paradox here:  “Unfortunately, the young people who are most in need of an elder’s wisdom are the least likely to realize it.”  The end result is the same:  this is a terrible time to grow old.

Doris Bersing, a psychology faculty member with Saybrook’s Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies, doesn’t disagree with that basic conclusion, but thinks Greenspun has left one critical element out of the equation:  the elderly themselves.

Even if a young person wanted to receive guidance from knowledgeable elders – and don’t be mistaken, many of them do – where would they find one?  How would they connect?  Too often, they can’t.

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University

The key to civic engagement: to thine own self be true

12/11/2009

If you need a reason to get involved in your community, there are dozens. 

Studies show that people who are civically engaged tend to be healthier and happier and feel a greater sense of purpose and connection to their community.

Communities where people are engaged tend to be more resilient, prosperous, and safe – not to mention democratic. 

So why do so few people get involved?

There is good news:  a recent article in Miller-McCune notes that some local governments have recently seen strong results from programs designed to foster civic engagement. Even so, levels of participation in civic organizations and community groups … let alone just doing good for one’s neighbors … appears to be at an all time low.  Can this trend be turned around?

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