The Saybrook Forum

Posts

Alumni Messenger

Alumna Cheryl Faulkner Cook, MA '92, PhD '95 Passes in Auto Accident

05/11/2009
Alumna Cheryl Faulkner Cook, MA '92, PhD '95 Passes in Auto Accident From Cheryl's husband, Thomas Cook: Dear Saybrook Alumni, I regret to inform you that my wife Cheryl was killed in a car accident on Dec. 8th 2006, in NH. It was a single car accident due to black ice on the highway. We had just had dinner at a local restaurant and were going to our NH home. I was following her in my truck...

Continue Reading

University

Turns out watching YouTube at work is NOT goofing off!

05/05/2009

Do you ever worry that maybe you spend too much time updating your Facebook status at work? 

Don’t.  An Australian study suggests that, in fact, your office should be encouraging it.
 
According to the research out of the University of Melbourne, people who use the Internet for personal reasons at work are nine percent more productive.

According to Wired Magazine, “’workplace Internet leisure browsing,’ or WILB, helped to sharpen workers' concentration,” so long as it took up less than 20% of their time at the office.”

Wow – who knew YouTube could be a productivity tool?

“This made me smile,” says Nina Serpiello, a PhD student in Saybrook’s Organizational Systems program and a human factors research designer at IDEO.  “A traditional company might not encourage goofing off without having a business reason for it, like cultivating creativity for innovation. If a company is interested in empowering employees to offer ideas to outsmart the competition, then it also should promote activities that stimulate creative thinking.”

Continue Reading

University

Life without universities

05/05/2009

Students posted about it on their Facebook pages;  faculty sent links back and forth;  at Saybrook’s San Francisco offices, administrators asked one another about it.  Everyone in the community, it seems, has an opinion about last week’s New York Times op-ed by Mark Taylor, “End of the university as we know it.”

In it, Taylor suggests scrapping traditional fields of study in favor of real-world problem solving clusters;  abolishing tenure and replacing it with seven year, renewable, teaching contracts;  replacing academic papers, and even dissertations, with scholarly multi-media presentations;  and training academics for careers outside of teaching.

It’s not the first time the death of the modern university has come up (link), but this time it’s engaged the Saybrook community like no other.

Here are some student and faculty reactions.  Please continue the conversation by leaving your own responses in the comments section.

Eugene Taylor:

Psychology faculty Eugene Taylor found the document “Orwellian” – and product of the very type of thinking it wishes would end.  

“(Mark Taylor) might be more optimistic if he were more person-centered. The very thing all his emphatic points miss is the spiritual side of learning.” Eugene Taylor wrote. 

Continue Reading

University

Ruth Richards receives prestigious APA award

05/05/2009

Ruth Richards was thrilled to discover she had won the prestigious Arnheim Award for Lifetime Achievement from the American Psychological Association – but she was less excited for herself than for her field. 

This award, and the fact that it specifically cites her as one of the pre-eminent scholars in the study of creativity, is a major recognition of the field she’s devoted much of her scholarly life to.

“Everyday creativity may seem obvious, even a necessity for any of us to survive in this crazy world,” says Richards, a member of the psychology faculty at Saybrook.  “But not everyone gets it yet.  Clearly (the APA) committee did, and this award helps make our work much more mainstream.”

The study of creativity, Richards points out, goes back to the founders of humanistic psychology:  both Abraham Maslow and Rollo May wrote a great deal about it.  Her contribution has been to take the creative out of the realm of the artistic, and instead show how it operates in daily life. 

Continue Reading

University

What the Dalai Lama’s dialogues can – and can’t – teach us about the mind

05/05/2009

Last month His Holiness the Dalai Lama held the 18th of his celebrated “Mind and Life” conferences – inviting notable neuroscientists to India in the hope that when Buddhist epistemology and western neurology compare notes, the results are educational for everyone.

It’s the sort of communication that Saybrook faculty say they’d like to see more of:  different intellectual approaches coming together to get a bigger sense of the picture.

“Exchanges between spiritual understandings of consciousness and scientific understandings can be mutually enriching,” says Amedeo Giorgi, a Saybrook faculty member in psychology who is a major figure in contemporary phenomenology.  “Such exchanges can only be helpful.”

They have born fruit in the past, according to an article in the London Guardian:

 

 (C)onferences have spurred the development of research programmes that examine the effects of Buddhist contemplative techniques and how they might be applied more widely to benefit humanity. They have, for example, been instrumental in the work of Richard Davidson at the University of Wisconsin, whose brain imaging studies found that experienced meditators show increased activity in the left prefrontal cortex of the brain, an area associated with emotional well-being, as well as having stronger immune systems.

But Saybrook psychology faculty Stanley Krippner, long at the forefront of the exploration of consciousness, says he always has mixed feelings when he hears about the Mind and Life conferences – because he thinks they could be taken to the next level.

Continue Reading

University

Explore “Creativity, Leadership, and Wisdom” with the Saybrook Dialogues

05/05/2009

The Saybrook Dialogues, a new series of conversations for networking, exploration, learning and making meaning of our personal and professional lives during uncertain and challenging times, presents its next program in early June.

“Creativity, Leadership and Wisdom” will explore the ways we can allow the creative process to inform our leadership, our work, and our lives.  It will be led by Steven Kowalski, Ph.D. and Marc Lesser, MBA.

Marc Lesser is the founder and president of ZBA Associates, a company offering coaching, consulting and facilitation services. Currently conducting executive training programs for Google, he is a board member of the Social Venture Network and the author is the author of Less: Accomplishing More by Doing Less.

Steven Kowalski has over 25 years expertise in the field of creativity and innovation, and is the founder and president of Creative License.  Since 1995, Steven has facilitated, coached, and trained clients in the U.S. and Europe to activate creativity and ingenuity of leaders, teams, and entire departments.  He currently provides executive development solutions to impact performance and business aims at Genentech. 

The Dialogue will be held Thursday, June 4, at 7 p.m., at the Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center’s San Francisco offices.  Seating is limited. A $25 donation is requested.

To reserve a seat, RSVP to Terry Hopper at 415-394-5220, or thopper@saybrook.edu.  

Continue Reading

University

Center for Mind-Body Medicine to offer spring programs in cancer treatment and food for health

05/05/2009

James S. Gordon, the Dean of Saybrook’s Mind-Body Medicine Program, and the Center for Mind-Body Medicine, now affiliated with Saybrook, are pleased to offer two training programs this summer. “CancerGuides II,” and “Food as Medicine.

CancerGuides II, which grew out of a conference that the New Yorker called “the most important alternative medicine meeting in America,” teaches health professionals and patient advocates to create safe, effective, individualized programs of comprehensive and integrative care for people with cancer and their families.

World leaders in integrative care and CancerGuides practice will help participants put their work in a larger social, historical and ecological context. Plenary speakers will offer a vision of cancer care that is fully consonant with the principles of integrative medicine, a vision which we believe will be reflected in policies the Obama Administration will implement.

“Food as Medicine,” a comprehensive clinical nutrition training program for healthcare professionals, will focus on sustainable nutrition, nutrition in practice, digestive healing, longevity and the aging brain, family nutrition, community nutrition, herbal remedies, and more. 

Both programs will be held June 11 – 14, in Washington D.C.. 

For more information, or to register, visit www.cmbm.org

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Sustainable Enterprise 2009 | May 8th Conference

05/01/2009
Dear Friends and Colleagues, This year's conference is packed with information about opportunities to prosper in these challenging economic times: green financing, energy efficiency programs that drop your energy costs immediately, how to effectively market the good work you're doing, and how to green your career. We've got some last minute great ticket deals and even some exhibitor space. It's...

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Alumnus Michael Mayer, PhD '77 Publishes New Book on Energy Psychology

05/01/2009
I'm very happy to announce the release of my new book, Energy Psychology: Self Healing Methods for Bodymind Health. Many leaders in the field now consider energy psychology to be at the cutting edge in the field of psychology and integrative medicine. In my new book I provide poignant examples of how my patients have benefited by applying energy psychology methods developed over many years in...

Continue Reading

Alumni Messenger

Call for Proposals-Global Citizenship for the 21st Century

05/01/2009
http://www.csupomona.edu/~international/news/IntlConference.pdfCall for Proposals Global Citizenship for the 21st Century http://www.csupomona.edu/~international/news/IntlConference.pdf The 21st Century has ushered in new opportunities as well as great challenges to global citizenship. What are the practical and theoretical implications of global citizenship to communities and nations? This...

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus