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Mind-Body Medicine

Aphrodisiac Nutrition

02/15/2014

Delahna Flagg is a professional chef and full-time student pursuing a Master’s degree in Mind-Body Medicine.  Delahna is passionate about aphrodisiac nutrition and intends to combine

Food - Love - Relationship

as a way to ignite passion and self-awareness, and elicit a higher sense of consciousness for the people that she works with.

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New Existentialists

It Is Time We Grow Up

02/14/2014
It Is Time We Grow Up
For the past several months, political pundits and sports journalists have spent a great deal of time speculating on the impact of Russia’s strict anti-LGBT stance and laws and the impact they might have on the Olympic competitions. Against this backdrop, Michael Sam, a senior defensive lineman from the University of Missouri, announced, in an interview with ESPN, that he was gay. This revelation has generated all kinds of responses, reactions, and rejoinders concerning the impact of a self-pronounced gay player in an NFL locker room. The feedback from those associated with the NFL have...

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New Existentialists

The Island of Love and Existential Suffering

02/13/2014
The Island of Love and Existential Suffering
It was two in the morning, and I was writing my latest poem. Not a peculiar activity for me. Poetry is the only thing that wakes me and prevents me from sleep. Or in truth, it was my head and heart brimming with words to describe emotions which I needed to release, that actually caused the insomnia. The topic was love, or the lack thereof. Words flowed and tensions eased, then I was finally able to sleep. The next morning, I was still plagued with the paradoxical feeling of emotional fullness and frailty. I went to write more and started scrolling through my poetry. I clicked on one after...

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New Existentialists

Mystery, Uncertainty, and Death in the Ural Mountains: Part II: Uncertainty = Terror, But Mystery = Uncertainty, So...?

02/12/2014
Mystery, Uncertainty, and Death in the Ural Mountains: Part II: Uncertainty = Terror, But Mystery = Uncertainty, So...?
Uncertainty is one of our greatest imaginary foes while mystery is our idol. How can that be? On the one hand, people don’t stomach uncertainty too well—they plan their future, follow five-year plans, have career trajectories, have goals of doing some things by certain ages, whether it’s graduating from school or buying a house, etc. People act as if the future is certain and secure, as if their plans will reach fruition, often without planning for obstacles. In fact, in his well-known work, Escape from Freedom, Erich Fromm (1941) shows that people value certainty and...

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New Existentialists

Mystery, Uncertainty, and Death in the Ural Mountains: Part I: Addicted to Mystery?

02/11/2014
Mystery, Uncertainty, and Death in the Ural Mountains: Part I: Addicted to Mystery?
Mystery is typically something that eludes our human understanding, something that cannot be fully explained. Maybe it is a bit of an enigma, getting a whiff of the forbidden fruit without getting the full taste. Mysteries fascinate and attract us: this attraction is part of the reason we have movements like science, which strive, above all, to solve mysteries just for the sake of solving them. A mystery can be as simple as a beginner-level Sudoku puzzle or it can be something as complicated as the origin of species. Regardless of the type of mystery or its simplicity-complexity, it seems to...

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New Existentialists

Response to Responses

02/10/2014
Response to Responses
Adjunct faculty abuse is, in some small ways, like global warming. Some folks have a vested interest in denying its existence. If you see a blog or website entry on this phenomenon, watch the comments sections: there are a few comments repeated over and over that need to be addressed in a forum bigger than a comments section. One, repeated in many forms, is this one: if you don't like it, just work somewhere else. Other ways this argument is made include "adjunct faculty know what they are getting into," "this is supposed to be a part-time job," and "the college...

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Rethinking Complexity

My Perspective on Leadership

02/09/2014
My Perspective on Leadership
There are numerous definitions of leadership and many books continue to be written on this important subject. In my own experience, leadership starts with awakening to my being to do service in the world by using my innate gifts and talents. It is about alignment with my truth and soul purpose, and leaving a legacy by making a difference in the lives of others. A demonstration of my leadership role is following my calling to be a messenger of peace in my war-torn country and troubled Middle East region. In fact, I recently launched a Facebook page to share my poetry on peace. In a future post...

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New Existentialists

Existential Roundup

02/07/2014
Existential Roundup
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. This roundup starts off in Ancient Greece and Rome, because it seems that for those who like to diagnose mental illness, it is never too late. Check out The Atlantic’s article “Diagnosing Mental Illness in Ancient Greece and Rome." How different is it to diagnose depression as a mental illness as it is to say it was the will of Zeus? That is a whole different way of creating meaning. And often,...

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New Existentialists

Something to Cry About?

02/06/2014
Something to Cry About?
There’s been so much snow and ice in New York City this winter that when I had to commute in the snow and ice this week, all I wanted to do was cry. And when I stood outside snow for a half hour waiting for a bus that was already 20 minutes late, I just wanted to cry. The travelling in the snow and ice has just exhausted me, and the tears seem to be part of the frustration and overwhelm of the continued onslaught of weather obstacles. Or so I’d like to believe. New research reported in the February issue of the APA Monitor suggests a variety of new theories about crying, some...

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Rethinking Complexity

Our Urgent Work: Connection

02/06/2014
Our Urgent Work: Connection
What does it take to understand your neighborhood and how to better advocate for it? How are companies, organizations and individuals acting and investing in their own neighborhood? Our Urgent Work,™  a project I started this year to document the people of Pioneer Square, Seattle’s most popular vice district, is a web-based platform for sharing, connecting and discussing trends in social good in our own backyard in an increasingly digital age. Each month in Our Urgent Work,™  I plan to write one major piece on Pioneer Square on a major theme. This is my...

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