The Saybrook Forum

Posts

New Existentialists

Happy Birthday!

06/23/2014
Happy Birthday!
How do you celebrate your birthday? How do you celebrate “significant” birthdays? While any birthday can be special, many consider birthdays when one enters a new decade, at age 50, 60, 70, and beyond, particularly significant. When you are “public” about a birthday and your age, you are letting people know how many years you have lived. It is also an indication of how much time you may “have left.” Some people choose not to publically celebrate and acknowledge birthdays. In our youth-obsessed, anti-aging culture, it is understandable why we may try to hide...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Existential Roundup

06/20/2014
Existential Roundup
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. As we approach the summer solstice, we leave you with one more spring potpourri before the heat intensifies. A visit to a museum or art gallery will often provide a nice respite from the heat so we start this roundup with visit to view a new collection of photographs. “In the Shadow of Freud’s Couch” is a series of portraits by Mark Gerald, a photograph and a psychoanalyst, who wanted to show the...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

The Artifice of Artificial Intelligence

06/19/2014
The Artifice of Artificial Intelligence
June has been the cruelest month for Artificial Intelligence. This month, a computer program beat the Turning Test—and thereby invalidated the Turing Test. The Turing Test, for those who don’t know, is a test based on a premise by Alan Turing, the computational godfather. The idea: if a computer can be mistaken for a human being, by other human beings, in conversation, then it is functionally “intelligent”—the only way we have to measure intelligence. For decades, there have been contests in which judges try to determine whether the person on “the other...

Continue Reading

Rethinking Complexity

Individuals and Human Systems: Searching for Knowledge Between the Disciplines

06/18/2014
Individuals and Human Systems: Searching for Knowledge Between the Disciplines
I walk in two worlds though neither is home. My work and education are based in and on human systems and psychology. I’m drawn to both for a sense and deeper understanding about when, how, and if people connect.  The energy from groups has been a positive reinforcement for me that people co-create and deliver a collective goal while empowering themselves and others. Airplanes fly, bridges get built, and communities mend themselves. No man, or woman, is an island. The psychological aspect of my focus involves my search for knowledge about who connects well or not, and about the...

Continue Reading

Rethinking Complexity

Individuals and Human Systems: Searching for Knowledge Between the Disciplines

06/18/2014
Individuals and Human Systems: Searching for Knowledge Between the Disciplines
I walk in two worlds though neither is home. My work and education are based in and on human systems and psychology. I’m drawn to both for a sense and deeper understanding about when, how, and if people connect.  The energy from groups has been a positive reinforcement for me that people co-create and deliver a collective goal while empowering themselves and others. Airplanes fly, bridges get built, and communities mend themselves. No man, or woman, is an island. The psychological aspect of my focus involves my search for knowledge about who connects well or not, and about the...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Seeking Alan Watts

06/18/2014
Seeking Alan Watts
The following is a (true) tall tale for existential-humanistic researchers demonstrating that not all research has to be tedious. When I first enrolled in the Alan Watts course at Saybrook University, I wasn’t too impressed by Watts. I thought he was sort of a pompous Brit lording it over the colonies—he even admitted he used a walking stick as an affectation. And of course, there was his attitude toward the Beats in his Beat Zen, Square Zen And Zen (1959) stating that in America, Zen was “young Americans’ non-participation in the American way of life” (p. 92)....

Continue Reading

Mind-Body Medicine

Dr. Donna Rockwell, Saybrook School of Mind-Body Medicine Instructor, to Discuss Mindfulness on the Katie Show

06/18/2014
Dr. Donna Rockwell, Member of Faculty, Saybrook School of Mind-Body Medicine

Saybrook University Mind-Body Medicine faculty member Dr. Donna Rockwell has conducted mixed-method research on the affect of mindfulness practice on graduate students in a clinical psychology program, and has seen in the outcome data the profound influence that mindfulness can have on psychotherapists, both in the work they do with clients and patients, as well as on their ability to implement self-care. Her research thesis was, “If I can’t sit with myself, how can I sit with another?” 

Now Dr. Rockwell will be appearing on the Katie Couric show on ABC-TV on July 8 to talk about mindfulness, its value, and why it seems to be a current craze. 

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Emotional Reactions to School Shootings Should Lead to Positive Change—So Why Don’t They?

06/17/2014
Emotional Reactions to School Shootings Should Lead to Positive Change—So Why Don’t They?
All forms of social media are lit up once again with reactions to the latest school shootings. These incidents, like so many before, have left us devoid of beautiful young lives full of promise. They have also left us with questions about gun control, male perceptions of women, and of course, mental illness. Why do these shootings evoke such strong reactions from us? How are they different from other acts of violence that we are faced with on a daily basis? Do we react the same to all school shootings or all mass shootings in America, or are there gradations in the level of emotional response...

Continue Reading

New Existentialists

Compassion in the Land of NIMBY

06/16/2014
Compassion in the Land of NIMBY
There have been distinct grumblings recently in the Midwestern suburban bubble that I live in. A new family moved in a few doors down from a friend of mine a few weeks ago, and as is customary in the land of the white picket fences, the neighbors were out in force to get a glimpse of the newcomers. It transpires that the new arrivals are a single parent family with two elementary school-aged daughters and a 20-year-old son. The neighborhood spies reported that the son does not seem to be at college or otherwise gainfully employed. Instead, he spends most of his time in his garage tinkering...

Continue Reading

Rethinking Complexity

Teaching Family Business in Dubai

06/15/2014
Teaching Family Business in Dubai
I have just finished teaching a course in family business in Dubai, a business oasis of 3 million people, a city-state with daringly designed high rises and bustling commerce on the Arabian Gulf. For four days, this open and eager group of 75 mostly middle-eastern young men and women engaged in vigorous exchange.  Each of them wrote a personal account of their family businesses, and their stories gave me a window into the challenges of a poor and tradition-bound family struggling forward to enter a global, technical commercial world. In a generation the world of the middle east has been...

Continue Reading

Share this

share

Don't miss a thing - follow Saybrook on social media

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus