Psychology

07/02/2013

Saybrook Offers Certificate in Multicultural Psychology

Everyone in the world now has access to unparalleled communication technology: but do we know how to talk to each other?

Welcome to the new Tower of Babel. Peace and prosperity depends upon businessmen in urban China knowing how to talk to software designers in Russia, and Muslim police officers in Michigan. Texas oil workers need to understand what they’re hearing when a Brazilian trade delegation meets with the American Chamber of Commerce, and monks in Burma need to communicate effectively with the World Health Organization.

The extraordinary diversity of the world is both a strength and a challenge: we have more to offer each other … if we can understand each other. But that’s harder than ever.

Now Saybrook University, the leading center for scholarship in Humanistic Psychology for the last 40 years, is rising to the challenge. Its School of Clinical Psychology has just announced it will be offering Certificate in Multicultural Psychology.

Intended for professional psychologists and laymen alike, this unique certificate will help students navigate the extraordinary diversity of the world and become effective ambassadors between cultures – whether half a world away or across the street.

“We are immersed in our own culture and tend to be unaware of our values and their impact on others until challenged to understand alternative perspectives,” said Dr. Zonya Johnson, Lead Faculty of the certificate program. “Studying multicultural psychology allows us to make a commitment to understanding the wide variation in cultural values, histories, worldviews, and expectations, so that we are not left to interpret the behavior of others exclusively through the prism of our own culture.”

The Certificate is intended for students and professionals who wish to broaden their perspective in order to develop more effective assessment tools, training programs, clinical and community interventions, and government policies.

The Certificate in Multicultural Psychology will be a 16-credit program, open to both Saybrook students and members of the public, that includes five 3-credit courses and one final paper. Topics covered include:

African American cultural history and psychology;

  • Race, Class and Gender
  • Disparities in American health care
  • Disability, Rehabilitation, and Empowerment
  • Multiculturalism and social justice

Among others.

The certificate will be offered beginning in the Fall Semester of 2013. For more information, visit our website.

Posted at 06:04 PM

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