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Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies

05/10/2011

Every individual has a unique role and influence in the world that can be realized through their life’s work.

Saybrook’s College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies helps you find your passion, prepare for your career, and engage with the world to make it a better place. 

The premier graduate university for education in humanistic psychology;  a cutting edge pioneer in the study of organizational systems;  and the only American university offer accredited degrees in Human Science (the European tradition of social sciences) – Saybrook’s College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies (PHS) offers a truly unique opportunity to advance one’s life’s work through humanistic study, scholarship, and activism.

PHS degrees are offered in low-residency programs, allowing students to study while remaining in their careers and without relocating.  Students are required to attend a small number of Residential Conference each year for workshops, seminars, training, and intensives – and otherwise can complete coursework online. 

PHS offers the following degrees:

 

In Psychology:

 

In Organizational Systems:

 

In Human Science

 

Concentrations:

Students in any PHS program have the option of choosing a concentration in one of the following areas:

 

Certificates:

Saybrook offers 11 certificates to non-degree students and to degree students seeking to enhance their education.

To earn a certificate, students need to complete four 3-credt certificate courses, one 3-credit practicum course, and a 1-credit integrative paper that ties course study and research together. Students will earn 16 units by completing a certificate. When appropriate, Saybrook students can transfer credits earned through a certificate towards their degree program.

Saybrook offers certification in the following areas:

 

For more information about Saybrook’s Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies, visit www.saybrook.edu, or contact an admissions specialist.  

 

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Why other people know you better than you know yourself -- and how it can help

05/10/2011

607px-Sparkly_lip_gloss_in_mirror Others may know you better than you know yourself.

Researchers Simine Vazire and Erika Carlson explore this self-defining issue in an article published in the Current Directions in Psychological Science. (This study is actually a follow up to their 2010 study which was published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology).

In their 2011 piece, Vazire and Carlson suggest others have a better picture of who we are than we do. Why? Apparently we have a blind spot that is a result of what they refer to as “motivated cognitive process” in other words at some level we are motivated to not see all that we are. Those motivations can be conscious or unconscious, seen or hidden.

They suggest that we have a better concept of who we are internally, meaning we can tell what’s going on inside whether anger, anxiety or optimism. On the other hand, others have a better view of the external picture of us. For example, a good friend may tell you that you give off a confident energy when you may not believe that you do. According to this research your friend is probably right. But they are probably not picking up on what is going on inside you – all of that anxiety behind the confidence. This doesn’t mean the confidence is not there. It means that both are present and part of your experience.

Vazire research shows that across the board, others are able to give accurate impressions of one another:  but here are exceptions.

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Are good communication skills the foundation of psychological success?

05/09/2011

Y_Spellings_and_Dr__Louis_Sullivan,_dean_of_the_Morehouse_School_of_Medicine,_talk_at_a_round_table_discussion_at_Morehouse_College_in_Atlanta,_Georgia In conversation, as in life, it turns out that the little things matter a lot.

How you talk can make or break you. In fact, there is an entire science devoted to improving face-to-face communication – and it suggests that flawed communication is a major source of relationship distress and demise.

In Is Your Communication Style Affecting Your Relationship for Better or for Worse?, Dr. Sherrie Bourg Carter suggests that conversational styles and patterns in relationships are a major source of clandestine stress. Dr. Bourg Carter contends that many relationships and communications involve parties who are essentially speaking “a different language” depending on their level of directness, assertiveness, and compassion.

Dr. Bourg Carter is among many psychologists who suggest the importance of effective face-to-face communication for relationships and interpersonal fulfillment. It’s long been suggested that communication depends on the on “skill sets” or “talk habits” in one’s conversational repertoire.

In The Talk Book: The Intimate Science of Communicating in Close Relationships, author Dr. Gerald Goodman explores the skill sets needed for improved communication, transformed relationships, and fulfilled interpersonal relations. Dr. Goodman purports that changing six talking habits will transform all facets of your life.

Here’s some suggestions:  

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You can't diagnose a mental disorder the way you fix a toaster - but the DSM keeps trying

05/06/2011

Cover_of_Diagnostic_and_Statistical_Manual_of_Mental_Disorders It’s been a busy for the manual of mental disorders.

A new organizational framework was announced for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Published by the American Psychiatric Association, it’s the book doctors look at to decide if you’re crazy and what medicine to prescribe for it.  It may or may not be accurate – but it’s a big deal. 

The newest version, now scheduled for May 2013, is proposing to restructure previous categories and chapters to reflect scientific advancements and hypothesized. 

Sounds good, but there’s one big problem:  the DSM has always been flawed, and the proposed DSM-5 looks to be no better.

The flaw is that it tries very hard to figure out symptoms, but no time at all trying to understand people. 

There’s no empirical validation to this approach … and it’s packed with conflicts of interest to the drug companies who benefit each time a new symptom is deemed “treatable” by drugs.    

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It matters what the voices in your head are saying

05/05/2011

Schizophrenia_PET_scan Have you ever been known or been with someone who was diagnosed as schizophrenic? Have they ever shared their experiences with you?

Have you ever wondered what that’s like?

Hearing voices or “auditory hallucinations” is the one aspect that

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Can America come to terms with the post-911 reality it created?

05/04/2011

Flag_-_3rd_Infantry Emotions have run high since United States president Barack Obama announced the death of Osama bin Laden.

“The head of the snake is gone,” said Rudi Dekkers, the owner of the flight school that trained the two terrorist pilots responsible for killing thousands in the World Trade Center towers.

Bin Laden’s death marks a turning point of nearly a decade of grief, anger, and insecurity for all effected by the tragedies of 9-11. The tragic events of that day will forever be present as a reminder and a threat of the destructive capacities of terrorism.

But always remembering must not mean we stay locked in the past:  Amidst great pain and fear, issues of remorse, forgiveness, and rehumanization are beginning to surface in light of the gross human rights violations that followed September 11, 2001.

In the Journal of Humanistic Psychology, author Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela draws on experiences from the South African apartheid to remind us what remorse, forgiveness and rehumanization look like in the aftermath of gross human rights violations.

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There are no shortcuts to wisdom

05/03/2011

Platon_Aristote If you were wise, what would it be like?

I don’t mean “what would you know” – I mean “what would the experience of life be like?”  Are wise people different from the rest of us?  How do they live?

That’s the question Pscyhologist Dolores Pushkar set out to answer in a recently published piece:  “What Philosophers Say Compared with What Psychologists Find in Discerning Values: How Wise People Interpret Life”.

Pushkar, Etezadi, and Lyster acknowledge that there is no consensus on what defines wisdom, but they propose the following as being key aspects; knowledge, deep understanding of human nature, life contentment, empathy and the flexibility to see issues from others’ perspectives.

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What does it take to get mentally healthy in 21st century America?

05/02/2011

There is no health, without mental health. 

May is Mental Health Month—bringing hope and awareness for more than 54 million adults in America who have a diagnosable mental health condition. One and four American adults live with a mental illness that is diagnosable, debilitating and better yet: treatable.

It’s estimated that up to half of the more than 54 million people with a mental illness do not seek help. Cost, stigma, lack of information, or insufficient health insurance coverage account for the disparity—with frightening repercussions for individuals, families, society.

Poor mental healthcare is a public health crisis. Regrettably, it effects are widespread. Here are some of the frightful side effects--

  • Suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-24 year olds.
  • Older adults with untreated depression and diabetes—die at twice the rate of those who receive effective treatment and care for their depression.
  • Research suggests that students ages 14-21 with emotional disturbances or mental health conditions drop out of school at twice the rate of students with other disabilities.

Reforming America’s mental healthcare system begins as a grassroots level; by embracing the foundational principles inherent in humanistic psychology.

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Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies

05/01/2011

Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies

Every individual has a unique role and influence in the world that can be realized through their life’s work.

Saybrook’s College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies helps you find your passion, prepare for your career, and engage with the world to make it a better place. 

The premier graduate university for education in humanistic psychology;  a cutting edge pioneer in the study of organizational systems;  and the only American university offer accredited degrees in Human Science (the European tradition of social sciences) – Saybrook’s College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies (PHS) offers a truly unique opportunity to advance one’s life’s work through humanistic study, scholarship, and activism.

PHS degrees are offered in low-residency programs, allowing students to study while remaining in their careers and without relocating.  Students are required to attend a small number of Residential Conference each year for workshops, seminars, training, and intensives – and otherwise can complete coursework online. 

Learn about the degrees available from Saybrook's Graduate College of Psychology and Humanistic Studies.

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Obese kids are at higher risk for mental illness -- what are we going to do about it?

04/29/2011

A twenty year cohort study in The Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry looked at overweight and obese children and their risk of developing of a mental illness later in life. The research found that obese and overweight children have an increased risk for the development of a mood disorder in adulthood when the same overweight trends continued. The research included both sexes; however overweight and obese girls were found to have an even higher risk than boys for developing mood disorders and other mental health issues when the obesity continued on into adulthood. 

A first of its kind, the research looks at the psychiatric risk factors associated with obesity and overweight children. While more research is needed—one conclusion can be made. Obesity in American youth is a risk factor for the development of a mental disorder later in life.

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