Archives For: January 2009

Wounded, then ignored

01/26/2009

Early this month the U.S. Department of Defense made a momentous decision: soldiers suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder are not entitled to receive Purple Hearts.

That the DOD even reviewed the proposal shows how far acceptance of PTSD as a psychologically real – and devastating – condition has come.

Saybrook Psychology faculty member Stanley Krippner, author of “Haunted by Combat,” says that however good the idea, it was unrealistic to expect the military to extend the Purple Heart to PTSD victims.

“There is no question that PTSD victims can be as badly affected by enemy actions as personnel wounded by weapons or bombs. But that is not the issue,” Krippner said. To decide that a psychological wound meets a criterion set up for physical wounds is to think metaphorically. “But the military is not given to using metaphors when it comes to following regulations.”

Daniel Pitchford, a Saybrook student who works with veterans suffering from traumatic stress, still disagrees strongly with the decision.

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Wisconsin and Minnesota find "opportunity" in "crisis"

01/26/2009

Sometimes history happens – and nobody notices.

Two weeks ago the governors of Wisconsin and Minnesota challenged 200 years of precedent by announcing that, to cope with the financial crisis, they are directing their states to look for ways to share and consolidate services with each other.

It is virtually unheard of in the American system for states to look for ways to share services without a federal mandate. Also extraordinary is the fact that Wisconsin’s governor, Jim Doyle, is a Democrat while Minnesota’s governor, Tim Pawlenty, is a Republican – meaning that the effort crosses party lines.

Some of the services they’re looking at sharing, like pooling prison food and road salt purchases, or consolidating, like call centers and licensing functions, are so simple as to be almost no-brainers … but no two states have ever attempted this before.

What’s so exciting, says Nancy Southern, director of Saybrook’s Organizational Systems program, is that this is more than just a way to help weather a national crisis: it’s a first step in thinking about how the entire country functions.

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Could Saybrook be "The Last University?"

01/26/2009
In a time when outside pressure is pushing Saybrook to become more like everybody else, how does Saybrook push back by becoming more like itself?

Academia may not have a future, according to Stanley Fish.

Fish, a distinguished academic and New York Times blogger, wrote an article last week that landed like a bomb in every faculty lounge in America.

Soon, Fish said, there will no longer be a place for teachers who want to enliven their students’ minds rather than cramming them full of job-related skills.

We all know that American academia has become dominated by big money, big corporate partnerships, and an assembly-line mentality that treats students as “customers” rather than agents of learning. But we’ve all assumed this was an aberration – and that at some point we’d right this ship of fools.

But Fish, reviewing the book The Last Professor by Frank Donoghue, says those days are never coming back: the academy, as a place to nurture the mind, is dying out and won’t return.

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The collective unconscious of a violent protest

01/26/2009

The scene shocked the world. On New Year’s day, a Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) officer shot and killed an unarmed black man who was, according to videos, already on the ground and being restrained.

There was an outcry of outrage across the Bay Area: in Oakland, San Francisco, and other cities groups of protestors jammed the streets and destroyed businesses, cars, and property belonging to people who had nothing to do with the tragedy.

The officer has since been charged with murder, but the question still looms large for residents, often poor and black themselves, who suffered at the hands of demonstrators: why did they do that? And what, exactly, did they want?

Certainly they wanted Oscar Grant’s killer to be charged with murder, but there were a shopping list of other demands ranging from more training of BART police to the immediate end to racism and an Israeli pullout from Gaza.

How does that make sense, observers wondered? Even if people agreed with the protestors, how could they possibly give them what they wanted?

Saybrook faculty member Benina Gould, who has studied the causes of conflict around the world, suggests that the question arises because the protestors themselves don’t fully know – at least not on a conscious level.

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Saybrook and LIOS, step II

01/26/2009
The synchronicity, and common purpose, of their affiliation will soon be a precedent for future institutions
 

As the first class of LIOS/Saybrook students – 41 in all – is getting to work learning how to change the world, the opportunities of each institution are now being presented to each other.

LIOS, which offers Master’s degrees, is reporting a strong interest among its students in Saybrook’s PhD programs, while Saybrook has now added LIOS’ degree in Systems Counseling to its roster of Psychology programs, and its degree in Organization to its Organizational Systems program.

There were any number of practical reasons for the two organizations to come together –LIOS needed a new accrediting affiliation, Saybrook had just begun planning a full university structure – but what really made the connection possible, and the implementation so smooth, are deeply held, deeply compatible, philosophical visions not shared by every graduate school. In fact, as LIOS president Shelly Drogin noted recently in Linkage, the LIOS newsletter, Saybrook was one of LIOS’ first choices for affiliation the last time it needed one, in the 1980s. The fact that this time, LIOS was looking for affiliation at the same time that Saybrook was expanding to a university was, as Drogin calls it, “synchronicity at play.”

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"Saybrook Dialogues" to commence this spring

01/26/2009

A new series of public discussion will offer networking, exploration, learning, and community

Too often, discussions that the world should be having take place only in the classroom.

As part of its mission to both foster community and reach out to the world around it, Saybrook is pleased to announce a new series, “Saybrook Dialogues,” beginning in March.

Held at Saybrook’s San Francisco offices, the first dialogues in the series will focus on the topic of “Leadership, Wisdom, and Making a Difference.”

Organizer Marc Lesser, the founder and president of coaching and facilitation company ZBA Associates and the former director of Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, will focus the conversations on making meaning of our personal and professional lives during uncertain and challenging times.

The Saybrook Dialogues are free, but a $25 donation is requested from those who can give. More information will be forthcoming. To RSVP please contact Terry Hopper at: 415-394-5220.

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President's Message: Ideas can bring us together

01/09/2009

The Saybrook Forum represents an initiative designed specifically to enhance communication among the constituents of our community. Our dispersed environment presents several challenges to sustaining community and the spirit of this newsletter – as is the case with the several programmatic newsletters already in publication -- is to support a more cohesive and coherent Saybrook.

You will be receiving this communication on a regular basis – every other week to start. In it you will be able to read about developments at Saybrook in a variety of areas – student and alumni achievement, faculty publications, lectures, accomplishments, strategic planning development, events and public programs, etc. I also hope the newsletter will be a forum for exploration of issues and world events pertinent to graduate education in the disciplines we teach, thoughts on pressing issues in our various fields of study and research, editorials on institutional challenges and issues, creative writing, and so forth. We can make this newsletter whatever we want it to be, from a forum that publishes abstracts of (and links to) substantive essays to routine announcements of events and personnel developments -- and everything in between. It will be exciting, to be sure, to witness its evolution.

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What ambulance services can learn from coffee shops

01/09/2009

There’s good news for San Franciscans who are sick or injured – ambulance response times have increased noticeably after years of effort.

But it could have been great news.

That’s according to David Williams, a Saybrook PhD student in Organizational Systems, who is one of the nation’s leading experts in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system. A consultant with Fitch & Associates, he works with communities to assess their emergency systems and advises them on improvements.  He is also the research and author of two of the industry’s leading studies of operational and workplace practices and helped develop the leading EMS Leadership Forum called “Pinnacle.”

While stressing that he has not independently reviewed San Francisco’s EMS system, Williams says media reports indicate there’s still room for improvement – and that a more systemic, patient-centered, approach could be the answer in SF and across the country.

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What does your Shadow know about you? And what can you learn from it?

01/08/2009

What do you hate about yourself?  What is it about your personality that makes you squirm? 

 

And what does that mean?

 

According to James Hollis, one of the America’s leading Jungian psychologists, distrusting and disliking something about yourself is a fundamental part of the human experience:  but one that we rarely understand. 

 

Hollis will be in the Bay Area on Saturday, January 17, giving a public presentation about what legendary psychologist Carl Jung called “the Shadow” – the energies, motives, and agendas in every person which operate outside of our conscious control and are sometimes contrary to our professed values.  

 

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Diagnosing in the Dark: why the DSM should see the light

01/07/2009

Homosexuality used to be a mental disorder.  Shyness still is.  So is not being shy. 

The Diagnostics and Statistical Manual - the "Bible of Mental Illness" consulted by psychiatrists - is no stranger to controversy.  What gets classified as a mental illness differs every decade, and impacts millions of lives. 

But a new kind of controversy is surrounding the newest version of the DSM - before it's even been written.  A group of prominent psychiatrists, including previous DSM authors, are saying that the new edition is being written under a cloud of secrecy - which is unscientific, inadvisable, and possibly immoral. 

Without full disclosure of who's writing what, and why, they say, everything from personal prejudice to conflicts of interest could be codified as "best practice."

"(T)his unprecedented attempt to revise DSM in secrecy indicates a failure to understand that revising a diagnostic manual—as a scientific process—benefits from the very exchange of information that is prohibited by the confidentiality agreement," wrote Dr. Robert Spitzer,  who chaired the writing of the DSM II in 1980, in a letter to his colleagues. 

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It's already spring at LIOS

01/07/2009

The first ever Saybrook/LIOS Spring Program is now scheduled to launch on March 1 of this year. 

The is the first program to integrate the resources of Saybrook with the Leadership Institute of Seattle, enhancing the traditional LIOS offerings while remaining focused on the exceptional, always evolving experiential and transformative education that has been the LIOS trademark for almost 40 years.

Program participants will be guided by LIOS’ team of seasoned faculty – all of whom are  graduates of LIOS.  This unique feature is part of the vitality of LIOS’ programs, as alumni and current students are the best resources for new students.  Emphasizing this relationship creates programs that are dynamic and responsive, and a community that is closely knit. 

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Meet Eric Fox, Saybrook's new Dean of Instruction

01/07/2009

Saybrook is pleased to announce the hiring of its first Dean of Instruction, Eric Fox. 

Eric comes to Saybrook from Western Michigan University, where he was an Assistant Professor of Psychology and founded the university's Language, Cognition, and Instructional Technology lab.  He has a PhD in Learning & Instructional Technology from Arizona State University, and both his research and his teaching have focused on the use of technology as a pedagogical tool. 

"My role at Saybrook is to work with administration, faculty, and students to create the best learning environment that we can," Eric says. "Making sure that faculty are involved in the decision making process and are comfortable with the way we're designing and expanding programs, and that students are satisfied with the way everything works."

An eLearning and Web Design Consultant for nine years, he has a decade of experience developing and supporting technology-based teaching in higher education.  He says was Saybrook's history as a leader with distance learning and technology supported education that first interested him in the position.

"Saybrook's history of doing distance and graduate education in innovative ways was very appealing to me," Eric says.  "And this is a very exciting time to be part of it  Saybrook has a really great vision, some positive new programs, and very interesting initiatives coming into play.  The opportunity for me to apply some of my training and work to help keep Saybrook a leader in the field is very exciting."

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Can Humanistic approaches solve a crisis in geriatric care?

01/07/2009

As millions of older Americans watch their retirement savings get wiped out by the financial crisis, medical experts are warning that the system of geriatric health care is in a crisis all its own - one that money can't solve. 

Dr. Atul Gawande, a surgeon and Associate Professor of Public Heath at Harvard, told the New York Times this week that the number of geriatricians has declined significantly over the last 20 years, while the number of Americans 65 and older is on track to double in the next 20. 

The Washington post called this a crisis, noting that seniors make up just 12 percent of the population, but account for 34 percent of all prescriptions and 38 percent of all emergency medical service responses. 

Even if we had the money to spend, experts agree, the system of care we've set up - too few doctors who can spend too little time with patients whose conditions are often complicated - won't adequately care for them.  We need to do better.

A Humanistic approach to health care, which some practitioners have been applying to small groups, may offer a better approach - and that care is often community-based, focusing on patients' human needs as much as their medical needs.

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Saybrook to honor founder of Psychologists for Social Action

01/07/2009

This year Saybrook is proud to award an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters to Dr. Ethel Tobach, a significant figure in politically engaged psychology and the study of human beings. 

 

A Distinguished Consulting Faculty member at Saybrook, Dr. Tobach is curator emerita of the American Museum of Natural History and has made major contributions to the study of genetics and comparative and evolutionary psychology during her distinguished 50 year career as a researcher.  She has been a leader in psychology activist groups seeking constructive public policies, nuclear disarmament, and peace-building - and she was a founder of Psychologists for Social Action (PSA). 

 

The Honorary Degree of Doctor of Humane Letters is awarded annually to individuals who have made substantial contributions to the unique mission and purposes of Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center. The degree recognizes outstanding contributions to humanistic psychology or human science, and acknowledges general outstanding contributions to the arts and sciences, which are related to the unique mission and purposes of Saybrook. The honorary degrees also recognize outstanding contributions made directly to Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center. 

 

Dr. Tobach will receive the reward on Monday, Jan. 19, at the Westin Ballroom of the Westin San Francisco International Airport.

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