It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Academia

József Ferenczy's "Round Dance"
I have been thinking quite a lot lately about Abraham Maslow. I love to discuss with my students his theory of self-actualization and his hierarchy of needs. I often emphasize in class that like many stage or hierarchy models, the pyramid graphic may lend a false impression of uniform progression through—and prioritization of—each...
Adjunct faculty abuse is, in some small ways, like global warming. Some folks have a vested interest in denying its existence. If you see a blog or website entry on this phenomenon, watch the comments sections: there are a few comments repeated over and over that need to be addressed in a forum bigger than a comments section. One, repeated in many...
I am very pleased to take this opportunity to make an important announcement. As President of the Society for Humanistic Psychology—Division 32 of the American Psychological Association—I have commissioned a Task Force for the Advancement of Humanistic Research. The SHP Executive Board, at a Mid-Winter Meeting this past weekend, agreed...
I quit one of my jobs today. I’ve been trying to get out of the for-profit college that first employed me out of graduate school but, until recently, could not afford to. Remember that we all make choices from the range of options available rather than from a range of idealized possibilities. Just as people work at Wal-Mart or McDonalds...
Several years ago, when I learned of my election as President of Society for Humanistic Psychology and took on the role of President-Elect, I began to use this preparation time to reflect deeply on what it means to be a humanistic psychologist. Much of this preparation has been an exploration of the early history of the movement, and its emergence...
A law class at Roanoke College.
For years, I have heard horror stories of professors teaching diversity classes being traumatized by their students. Included were stories of a number of experts in diversity who were passionate about teaching diversity, but no longer wanted to teach diversity courses because their course evaluations were poorer than in other classes, included...
Sudden losses of ones we love can initiate the gut-wrenching reality we sometimes experience when confronting our finitude in mortality. Our existence is so fragile and susceptible to sudden termination and we know it. I have come to believe that everyone with whom I have a relationship, actually becomes part of me, and when they die, a piece of...
Johann Peter Hasenclever's Die Sentimentale
This past week I was looking for a definition of perception for some academic work and sat down to read through my notes on Aldous Huxley’s Doors of Perception (1954). The vivid accounts of magnanimous shifts of consciousness were enticing. I thought about the fantastic accounts of folds in trousers and bamboo chairs: how items in a drug...
Illustration by Ernst Lübbert.
During the past year, The New Existentialists featured a series of articles focusing on the future of existential psychology. But key to the growth of this third force in psychology is youth. In a new essay now available to the New Existentialists' library, Shawn Rubin details the events from the HECTOR project—Humanistic Existential...
Thomas Jefferson, by Charles Wilson Peale.
Our education system is currently in crisis. It is no secret that American children are at best average when compared to children from other countries (see, e.g., this Huffington Post article), and our adults fare very poorly on tests of math, science, history, and general knowledge. This has serious implications for our democracy. Thomas...
1886 Eli Lilly newspaper advertisement.
In part one of this blog, I discussed the beginning of my loss of faith in research, particularly psychological research. As I noted, I began my career interested in being a researcher. I conducted a number of studies, some of which I never sought publication for because of my own loss of faith in research. In part one, I focused a good deal on...
The second statistics book I ever read was How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff (1954/1982). If any statistic book could be considered a classic, it should be this book. At the time, I found it amusing, but did not really take it to heart. I learned that in order to get two out of three dentists to recommend almost anything, all you had to...