It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Diagnostic fiascos

Proposed diagnostic criteria for a new mental disorder for potential inclusion in the next version of the DSM: 309.XX Pathologizing Personality Disorder A.  Marked tendency to see other people's behavior as disordered and/or disturbing. B.  Presence of at least four of the following: (1) history of studying psychiatry and/or...
I think I “have” Asperger’s disorder. The “have” is in quotes because I’m not certain what it means to “have” it. If you have pneumonia, you just have it. There are bacteria in your lungs which are detectable and eradicable. You can go from having it to not having it to having it again, and each...
In September of 2011 Time Magazine interviewed outspoken cognitive therapist Allan Kazdin, a former President of the American Psychological Association.  In the interview, Kazdin calls for the end of individualized treatments in psychotherapy -- even if people want them -- in favor of standarized treatments.  New Existentialist Eugene...
Grief can hollow out a soul and pull someone down the depths of despair that can be all consuming. It is not something to ignore or to treat lightly, but grief is an inevitable in life as there are as many endings as there are beginnings. Can grief be so painful that it would warrant a psychiatric diagnosis of major depressive disorder? This is...
Some 11,000 mental health professionals have signed their names to a petition protesting the vast expansion of “mental illnesses” coming with the DSM-5, the “Bible of psychiatrists” which frequently determines what insurance companies will and won’t pay for.  Accusations of bias, drug company money, and an...
Does going to a psychotherapist mean you’re mentally ill? If you want it paid for by your health insurance, then the answer is yes. Why? Because in order to get paid, your therapist is required to diagnose you with a mental disorder. Another way to think about this is that insurance companies cover health problems. From their perspective, if...
What is the link between existentialism and a manual that gives most people on the planet their mental health diagnoses? From Major Depressive Disorder, to ADHD, to Asperger’s Syndrome, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is the book in which psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health professionals find the...
A lot of people are talking, once again, about the impact of childhood trauma. According to a recent post in Psychology Today’s blog, letting your infant child cry can scar them … mentally and physically … for the rest of their lives. Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez writes: “With neuroscience, we can...
The medical model draws a significant amount of critique in clinical psychology these days, especially from existential and humanistic psychologists, and for good reason. The medical model is deeply flawed in its basic assumptions, including its construction of mental illness and conceptualization of what it means to be human. Although ongoing...
When history looks back on the twenty-teens, I think this will be remembered as a decade of peaceful revolution. The Tea Party have become activists for human government. Whether you agree with them or not, and whether you see their purpose being subverted by corporate greed or not, theirs began as a social movement. The Arab Spring in the Middle...
The scandal de jour rocking the world of experimental psychology is a serious one:  not just that one prominent researcher faked his data, but that statistical sloppiness and bad protocols may be rampant across the board.  Obviously the field needs to retrench and learn a valuable lesson here.  But the question is:  which...
Smile and the world clicks “like” with you. New research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that the degree to which people smile for their Facebook photo is a good predictor of long-term well-being.  The researchers examined the Facebook profile photos of incoming freshmen, and had them fill out...