It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Diversity

The second statistics book I ever read was How to Lie With Statistics by Darrell Huff (1954/1982). If any statistic book could be considered a classic, it should be this book. At the time, I found it amusing, but did not really take it to heart. I learned that in order to get two out of three dentists to recommend almost anything, all you had to...
Earlier this week, Jon Stewart interviewed Malala Yousafzai on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. For those who don’t know, Malala is a 16-year-old Pakistani girl who the Taliban shot in the head at point blank range two years ago for advocating education for girls. She has since made a full recovery, written a book entitled I Am Malala, and...
In many ways, I applaud the maverick spirit of existential and humanistic psychology in leading the Coalition in the authoring of a powerful Open Letter to the DSM-5 Task Force and American Psychiatric Association that strategically delineated concerns about the development and subsequent publication of the DSM-5. I was doubly proud to see...
Photo by Chelsea Kennedy.
My six-year-old son got his first pedicure this last weekend. He was with three women at the nail shop, and initially, he decided against the pedicure but quickly grew bored with his video game and elected to join us. He chose blue for his nail color. Since then, he’s scarcely noticed the color and hasn’t even mentioned it but I am...
Photo by Esther Bubley, 1943.
Lately, whenever the topic of race and racism comes up, someone from the Ayn Rand, personal responsibility set pipes up, “Yes, but things are better now for the Black man than they have ever been. Everyone has the same opportunity, and we can all make of our lives what we want, if only we stop blaming each other and work hard.” I have...
Carpenter's (1857) The Eldest Son of the King of Delhi.
As I write this, it has been 12-years since I obtained my PhD in clinical psychology. In many ways, I feel quite proud of what I have accomplished; in other ways I struggle with the existential guilt associated with the privilege that allowed for that success. I write this as I near the end of my term as president of the Society for Humanistic...
Photo by Debra Sweet.
I was surprised by the intensity of my emotions when I heard the news of the Zimmerman verdict earlier this evening. George Zimmerman shot and killed Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African American youth. After a highly publicized trial, he was found not guilty. As I read the news alert, I immediately responded in anger. The next several minutes my...
Etching by Adi Holzer (1997).
The interest in theory and research pertaining to racial microaggressions is booming, yet it rarely gets mentioned in the existential literature. This, I believe, is a problem that needs to be rectified. I have written numerous articles arguing for the need for greater attention to diversity issues in existential psychology (see Hoffman, 2008;...
Billie Jean King. Photo by David Shankbone.
Two weeks ago, Jason Collins, a professional basketball player, announced he was gay via an article in Sports Illustrated. As I write this blog entry, Collins announcement is still causing somewhat of a stir among sports media types. Sports media outlets pronounced this a ground breaking moment in major sports history. Collins has been compared to...
Junkaroo festivities in the Bahamas.
Existential and humanistic psychology has struggled in is embrace of diversity (see Hoffman, 2012, for an extended discussion of this topic). Yet, there is hope that change is coming. The first vital step was working to gain widespread acceptance that diversity is an important topic worthy of consideration in existential psychology. Increasingly...
Photo by Toby Hudson.
To marginalize is the process of relegating or confining to a lower or outer limit or edge, as of social standing. Hence, marginalization is the social process of becoming or being made marginal (especially as a group within the larger society): "the marginalization of the underclass,” "the marginalization of literature."...
Photo by New York World-Telegram and the Sun.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967, just months prior to his assassination, addressed the American Psychological Association (APA), encouraging social scientist to take a more humanistic approach to understanding the effects of racism and segregation on African Americans by leaving the laboratory for the hedges and by-ways of American society:...