It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category History of Existenital-Humanistic Psychology

Photo by Siddharth Mallya.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. March 20 marked the Vernal Equinox—the first day of Spring—when new growth begins. Thus, in honor of the impending burst of new life, this existential...
Existential thought comes in an amazing variety of forms, representing an array of views on many issues. From Kierkegaard’s radical faith to Nietzsche’s radical doubt, “existentialism” is surely a child of both pluralism and controversy. Existential forms of psychology are similarly diverse in nature, representing...
Photo by the New York World Telegram and Sun.
Today we remember the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Rather than present secondhand analyses or interpretations, the New Existentialists will let the work of Dr. King speak for itself. We direct you to some of the following links to read some of his writings and his correspondence, as well as watch or listen to some of his talks and...
Several years ago, when I learned of my election as President of Society for Humanistic Psychology and took on the role of President-Elect, I began to use this preparation time to reflect deeply on what it means to be a humanistic psychologist. Much of this preparation has been an exploration of the early history of the movement, and its emergence...
Photo by Ed Yourdon.
On a globe that daily witnesses countless acts of conflict both large and small, our human capacity for altruism seems more important than ever. Not surprisingly, psychologists today are increasingly interested in understanding this vital care-giving phenomenon, certainly with the hope that such knowledge will lead to a more harmonious humanity....
Illustration by Ernst Lübbert.
During the past year, The New Existentialists featured a series of articles focusing on the future of existential psychology. But key to the growth of this third force in psychology is youth. In a new essay now available to the New Existentialists' library, Shawn Rubin details the events from the HECTOR project—Humanistic Existential...
Michigan School of Professional Psychology
Of being with Clark Moustakas,  Diane Blau recalls: I enter his office filled with a keen sense of anticipation. I have been invited here, all of me. I know there is a dedicated space prepared for me, ready for whatever I bring. I sit and feel his gentle and vital presence, his soft gaze, and a leaning in, a patient waiting. There is a...
The theme of this blog concerns R. D. Laing’s conception of psychopathology. This is not an easy topic to explore, in part because Laing was somewhat ambivalent about the concept and avoided even using this term. In The Politics of Experience (1967) Laing famously questioned whether schizophrenia, the form of psychopathology he is most...
Mick Cooper’s (2003) Existential Therapies sat on my shelf for a number of years waiting for some well-deserved attention. I put off reading it knowing that it was a review of the different approaches to existential therapy, which I was already quite familiar with. Thus, I did not think I would get much from this book. In quickly searching...
Through the work of existential-humanistic and transpersonal psychologists Carl Rogers, Abraham Maslow, and Rollo May in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, the psychotherapeutic hour became a living laboratory in which the individual’s discovery of the growth-oriented, self-actualizing dimension of his or her personality was educed. Rogers, Maslow,...
Do you enjoy challenges in everyday life? Does your work give you a sense of personal meaning? Is helping to make the world a better place important to you? If you answered yes to all of these questions, then you’re likely to be intrinsically motivated—standing near the top of Abraham Maslow’s famous pyramid of inborn needs. But...
One of the interesting aspects of being an existential therapist is learning the perceptions that others have about what it means to be existential. After having taught about existential psychology at seven universities, I have heard quite a few different perspectives. However, the diversity within existential psychology is maybe as diverse as the...