It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

Categories

Posts tagged with the category Key Concepts

Uncertainty is one of our greatest imaginary foes while mystery is our idol. How can that be? On the one hand, people don’t stomach uncertainty too well—they plan their future, follow five-year plans, have career trajectories, have goals of doing some things by certain ages, whether it’s graduating from school or buying a house,...
Mystery is typically something that eludes our human understanding, something that cannot be fully explained. Maybe it is a bit of an enigma, getting a whiff of the forbidden fruit without getting the full taste. Mysteries fascinate and attract us: this attraction is part of the reason we have movements like science, which strive, above all, to...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. This roundup starts off in Ancient Greece and Rome, because it seems that for those who like to diagnose mental illness, it is never too late. Check out The Atlantic...
There’s been so much snow and ice in New York City this winter that when I had to commute in the snow and ice this week, all I wanted to do was cry. And when I stood outside snow for a half hour waiting for a bus that was already 20 minutes late, I just wanted to cry. The travelling in the snow and ice has just exhausted me, and the tears...
We are deeply unsure about the differences between man and machine in the 21st century. The movie “Her” presumes that a slightly more advanced operating system will be capable of love and self-actualization. In The New York Times, David Brooks has devoted several columns to asking what kind of people will thrive in an era where...
A few weeks ago, during one of the many snowstorms New York City has been hit with in this crazy winter, I turned into a school-age child, hoping against hope, that the snow would continue to fall hard enough overnight that school would be cancelled the next day. My teaching commitment for that day requires two buses and a train into areas I was...
Photo by Amanda Piersza.
In the interest of “full disclosure,” I will be the first to admit I am a “football illiterate.” I know nothing about the game, have never been interested in it, and can count the number of football games I have seen on one hand. Growing up, my family was not sports-minded and the only interest we had in football concerned...
National Library of Ireland on The Commons.
Science: the place where we abandon our perspective and values, seeing problems from no point of view, studying problems as they come along with no special motivation other than pure knowledge. M.A.S.H.'s Col. Potter had a word for this sort of thing: horsepuckey. Here's the thing: we're humans. We are embodied humans, genetically and...
Each person thinks that he has the formula for triumph over life’s limitations and knows with authority what it means to be a man….”-- Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death, p. 255 This is precisely the question right now in not one but two headline cases. One concerns 13-year-old Jahi McMath in Oakland, CA, who developed...
Giambologna's Hercules and the Dragon Ladon.
In Joseph Campbell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949), he posits the existence of a Monomyth, a word he borrows from James Joyce referring to a pattern that is the essence of and universally common to, heroic tales in every culture. He outlines the archetypal episodes that subdivide three stages of the hero’s journey (separation,...
Photo by Drake Spaeth.
During any active semester, my commuting routine every Monday through Thursday includes in part a brisk walk in the morning and again in the evening back and forth between Chicago’s Union Station and the Merchandise Mart, one of the buildings that houses The Chicago School of Professional Psychology where I teach. I cross over the Chicago...
Photo by Bundesarchiv.
These days we think of students as precious little orchids whose self-esteem must not be bruised by their education. The notion of a “teacher” as an authority figure is out of fashion. Have we got it all wrong? Writing recently in the Wall Street Journal, author Joanne Lipman made a case that an old-fashioned education is still the...