It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Key Concepts

Not long ago I reviewed a piece written by Emory Cowan on existential aloneness. It was a hopeful piece dealing with a Cowan's subject matter that is usually seen as being by some as being dark and bleak. It may seem that existential psychology focuses just on the idea that it is so hard and lonely to be human. It can be. But the existential or...
Recovery is: “A process of change through which individuals improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential.” This is the new working definition of recovery that was co-created by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the public in a recent...
"I believe that the key to creating society that is nourishing, empowering and healing for everyone lies in how we relate to one another." -- Martin Buber, an Austrian born Jewish philosopher I came across his work early in my studies of existentialism and existential psychology. Buber’s philosophy was genuine and showed his...
Those who say psychology should be more like physics should read two recent articles and get their heads turned around: physics is becoming more like psychology. A new article about Freud in Prospect Magazine begins with a fundamental error: it suggests that Freud has been repudiated by psychology for refusing to flatter mankind. While his...
Recently McGraw-Hill announced it was reissuing the seminal 1995 text The Psychology of Existence, by Kirk Schneider and Rollo May.  It was the last book May ever wrote, and he edited a galley copy just two days before his death. Psychology of Existence was intended to be a foundational book for the revitalization of existential...
What is the best way to measure performance? What role should metrics play? Should measurements strive to be entirely “objective”? What is the best way to measure “reality”? These are some questions I have grappled with in recent months trying to understand students’ grading concerns in a graduate course I taught in...
Ayn Rand’s “The Fountainhead” is about an iconoclast (Roark), a man with a vision and the character to see that vision manifest in the world.  Along the way, he is beaten down and tormented by “second-handers” who not only mock his vision but sue him for ineptitude and steal his company. In the end, this...
Note: this is a previuosly unpublished adaptation of a presentation originally made as part of a panel, Ethics of Alterity: Implications of Levinas for Psychotherapy, at the Third Annual Conference on Counseling and Spirituality: Trends, Traditions and Ethics, Gannon University, Erie, PA, September 22-23, 2000. I decided to include it after...
The medical model draws a significant amount of critique in clinical psychology these days, especially from existential and humanistic psychologists, and for good reason. The medical model is deeply flawed in its basic assumptions, including its construction of mental illness and conceptualization of what it means to be human. Although ongoing...
A notice to readers of the New Existentialists on the feature article “Searching for Meaning” in the American Psychological Association Monitor on Psychology (November, 2011): This article is groundbreaking because for the first time in memory, existential-humanistic therapy is being exclusively featured in the flagship newsletter of...
We are approaching that time of year known as “Halloween.”  While Halloween may not have achieved the holiday status of Thanksgiving or Christmas, it is second only to Christmas in revenues (seven billion) generated by sales of scary costumes, decorations, candy, and haunted activities.  It is the season when my grandmother...
We exist on a middle scale.  This means when we look down in scale, there are things much smaller than us and, if we look up in scale, there are things much larger. It is easy to think the middle scale represents reality and that these other scales are simple distractions, unimportant, and strange.  But is the middle scale really that...