It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Key Figures

Photo by Miguel Virkkunen Carvalho.
In the beginning of October, I was lucky enough to participate in a two-day workshop with Dr. Kirk Schneider, here in Athens, Greece! It was organized by “gignesthai,” the Hellenic association for Existential Psychology. I’ll write to you about this experience, with my own little words and from where I stand today. Maybe if I...
Knud Leem's 1767 copper carving of a Shaman.
Charlotte Bühler’s Theory of Development Charlotte Bühler, a pioneer in women’s adolescent psychology, emphasized the distinctions between humanistic psychology and the Freudian science that had dominated the discipline earlier in her career. She pointed out that development is synonymous with health and self-realization...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Lately, while dealing with a period of high stress, I have found cookies—specifically those with Dulce de Leche chips—a huge source of comfort. Thus,...
Courtesy of Renate Horney Patterson.
The work of Karen Horney sheds light on the internal psychosexual conflicts and unspeakable experiences of women who remain subjugated by Middle Eastern and African cultures today. The writings of Horney give an informed understanding of much of the underlying dynamic. Horney’s psychoanalytic revisionism went through three phases. In the...
Sketch by Alexandru Darida.
In Images and Symbols: Studies in Religious Symbolism (1991), Mircea Eliade* focuses on the Indian symbols of time and eternity and the function of myth as an account of events that took place in the beginning. In the beginning was a primordial, non-temporal instant, or a moment of sacred or Great Time. Myth takes the person out of their own...
Reading Myrtle Heery’s (2014) edited anthology Unearthing the Moment: Mindful Applications of Existential-Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychotherapy reminded me why I love and am so passionately committed to these fields of study and practice. Heery and 24 other contributing authors offer penetrating insights into core aspects of existential...
Gustave Dore's illustration for Don Quixote.
We've got a glaring problem in this country and world. It's not our only problem and it isn't the cause of all sorrows, but today, it's one of the chief problems we face—and it is scarcely scrutinized by psychologists. The problem to which I refer is our socio-economic model for living. In these days of school shootings,...
Lu Xun
Quick to kindle, quick to calm down, an even quick to grow decadent, men of letters [i.e., a type of scholar] can always find reasons and precedents from the classics to justify their shifts of allegiance. (Lu Xun, 1931/2003) One repays a teacher badly if one always remains nothing but a pupil. (Nietzsche, 1892/1966) The impulse in contemporary...
Illustration by Ivan Yakovlevich Bilibin.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. As we approach the summer solstice, we leave you with one more spring potpourri before the heat intensifies. A visit to a museum or art gallery will often provide a...
Aboard the Vallejo. Photo by Rick Umbaugh.
The following is a (true) tall tale for existential-humanistic researchers demonstrating that not all research has to be tedious. When I first enrolled in the Alan Watts course at Saybrook University, I wasn’t too impressed by Watts. I thought he was sort of a pompous Brit lording it over the colonies—he even admitted he used a walking...
Photo by Lululemon Athletica.
I have a quirky knack. For as long as I can remember, I have been able to pinpoint the exact center of a space or midpoint of a line. I can also space objects at equal distances from each other (when I care to do so) by simply “eyeballing” the entirety of what I am trying to accomplish. My accuracy is downright scary. My wife will be...
Photo by John Robert Charlton.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. This week’s roundup starts with a few surprises—a few little ditties to see how awake we all are. The first surprise comes from a blog in England...