It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Media

Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Lately, while dealing with a period of high stress, I have found cookies—specifically those with Dulce de Leche chips—a huge source of comfort. Thus,...
I am not an activist. No, I am not and you can't make me one. I am a pacifist of the worst order, the kind who confuses peacefulness with inaction. I prefer inaction. If humankind is going to ride the rails it is building straight into the maw of hell, I prefer to let it; we have to learn from our mistakes, and I am busy trying (and failing)...
During a recent stretch of 21 consecutive days of work, I chose to post almost daily updates on Facebook noting what day of the “workathon” I was on and what was new. My reasoning, I justified, was to get a little moral support during what I correctly figured was going to be a grueling stretch and to feel a little less alone in the...
Photo by Matthew Bowden.
It doesn’t have an Upworthy headline, but a lot of attention is being paid to Amanda Hess’ article for the Pacific Standard explaining “Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet.” Her argument is that a culture of misogyny that has built up in online forums like Twitter, where unrestricted speech and privacy are...
Photo by José Goulão.
The news last week was obsessed with the inability of Congress to govern the country, as demonstrated by the shutdown. Cable sources were distracted for a moment by a woman who ran some barricades and was shot to death as she exited her car on Pennsylvania Avenue. It is our fault. We are a nation increasingly obsessed with violence. Our Congress...
It’s not our problems that are killing us, says Saybrook faculty member Kirk Schneider:  it’s our minds.  We can’t solve problems ranging from global warming to Wall Street malfeasance because we are caught in a mental trap – what he calls “the polarized mind.”   Schneider will be discussing his...
Photo by Wikimedia Foundation.
I am almost always angry nowadays. Things in the world and in our country are going so wrong, I can’t see how any caring person can stay calm and sane. Politics in particular troubles me deeply, as a system manipulated to keep the worst people in power daily produces existential threats to our very species and mocks the people who point to...