It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Self-Actualization

Drawing by Leonardo da Vinci
When does life begin? In the shadow of the President’s announced requirements concerning birth control, and the Republican’s awkward dance of being the most “pro-life” candidate, there is a renewed emphasis on the question, “when does life begin?” Is it at conception? Or, perhaps at a certain stage of development of the fetus? Maybe it is when the...
Yesterday I was speaking with a colleague at the college where I teach, a sociology instructor, who asked me this question: “Why doesn’t our society teach people how to be happy?” Implicit within this question, which became more explicit in our brief conversation, was a shared concern regarding our cultural values, focusing particularly on the...
Existential joy is the moment of exaltation in which we are at one with the world and conscious of our being in a kind of illumination that carries a deep conviction with it. This is a state of being that many people seek to experience in their lives. If we cannot have it all of the time, we at least want that sensation coursing through us most of...
Years of working with adults with developmental disabilities have left me with questions regarding the meaning and meaningfulness of the lives of people who experience high levels of mental retardation. I mean something different here from purpose.  What a divine entity might mean for these people must remain a question beyond my ability to...
A major tenet of existentialism is we create our lives through our values, choices, and actions. Certainly, no one would say this is an “easy” task during any time period. European Existentialists of the 1940s and 1950s, such as Sartre, de Beauvoir, Camus, and Frankl, formed their philosophies with World War II as a backdrop—when...
In Times Square is the Ripley’s Believe It or Not “Odditorium,” a two-story attraction filled with exhibitions many of which are just perfect to bring out one’s inner eight-year-old boy. Ancient weapons, the size 25 Reeboks from the largest woman in the world, a paper-mache replica of the average meal consumed by world...
Self-promotion often gets a bad rap, and for good reason. Most people have experienced individuals who frequently self-aggrandize and promote themselves. These individuals often are dismissed as narcissistic and self-centered. When analyzing these self-promoters, even the armchair analyst knows that it is common for this to be an attempt to cover...
We know the internet has changed the way we shop, socialize, and schedule – but how is it changing our sense of human potential. When we dream of who we might be in a networked world, what are we dreaming about? According to Dana Klisanin, Executive Director of Evolutionary Guidance Media Research & Design, society has focused on the...
How does one move into the acceptance of death, when hope has been the sustaining force of life? The question is upon me at this moment after hearing the news that someone close to my heart, in years and shared existence, has been told that her cancer is incurable and nothing more can be done. This woman, otherwise young and vital through every...
Every relationship ends.  We grow apart, we lose touch, tragedy strikes; even in the most hopeful circumstances, one person must outlive the other.  Our losses compound and sometimes it gets difficult to engage in new relationships.  If a loss is especially traumatic and there is nobody to understand and nurture, in fact it becomes...
Dr. Louis Hoffman recently published a book, Existential Psychology: East-West, is a collection of articles written by leading scholars of Existential psychology. I was drawn to one particular chapter titled “An Existential Analysis of American Beauty” by Cathy Calvert, Kate Calhoon, Steve Fehl, and Christen Gregory. Briefly, the film...
Isms are dangerous things when used thoughtlessly.  The most obviously dangerous is racism: advocating for the rights of one group over another, with corresponding denigration of those not belonging to the racist group. It is easy to point to American racism, typically white-on-black hate so endemic to parts of our culture.  It is...