It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Benjamin Wachs

"The spiritual side, the poetic side, the giving and forgiving side, the generous and loving side, are humankind's finest features.  Hebb defined psychology many years ago as not being poetry.  Although Hebb was my scientific hero, I demur from defining psychology without poetry." - Frank Farley, American Psychological...
Some 11,000 mental health professionals have signed their names to a petition protesting the vast expansion of “mental illnesses” coming with the DSM-5, the “Bible of psychiatrists” which frequently determines what insurance companies will and won’t pay for.  Accusations of bias, drug company money, and an...
We know the internet has changed the way we shop, socialize, and schedule – but how is it changing our sense of human potential. When we dream of who we might be in a networked world, what are we dreaming about? According to Dana Klisanin, Executive Director of Evolutionary Guidance Media Research & Design, society has focused on the...
Those who say psychology should be more like physics should read two recent articles and get their heads turned around: physics is becoming more like psychology. A new article about Freud in Prospect Magazine begins with a fundamental error: it suggests that Freud has been repudiated by psychology for refusing to flatter mankind. While his...
A lot of people are talking, once again, about the impact of childhood trauma. According to a recent post in Psychology Today’s blog, letting your infant child cry can scar them … mentally and physically … for the rest of their lives. Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez writes: “With neuroscience, we can...
Recently McGraw-Hill announced it was reissuing the seminal 1995 text The Psychology of Existence, by Kirk Schneider and Rollo May.  It was the last book May ever wrote, and he edited a galley copy just two days before his death. Psychology of Existence was intended to be a foundational book for the revitalization of existential...
Americans might not be able to sit still long enough to learn that they were given 51.5 million prescriptions for Addention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in 2010. That's about one prescription for every six Americans -- so many that pharmaceutical companies are now experiencing shortages of the medication.  If this keeps up many...
The latest 5 car pileup on the information superhighway is a column called “If I was a poor black kid.”  Naturally it’s written by a white, middle-aged, technology reporter for Forbes, because … well, of course.  It’s advice from writer Gene Marks on how urban poor minority juveniles can use technology to...
A new book is promoting a new, mechanistic, theory of why we laugh.  According to the authors of  Inside Jokes: Using Humor to Reverse-Engineer the Mind Human being have a sense of humor because the mind is a computer (“our brains are Chevy engines running Maserati software”) dedicated to constantly making sense of the...
Periodically someone will publish the results of a study suggesting that “we” are smarter than our political enemies. Liberals are more open to new ideas, conservatives have more common sense – somehow the idea that our political beliefs are determined by our IQ lets some of us sleep easier at night. Daniel Klein isn’t one...
The scandal de jour rocking the world of experimental psychology is a serious one:  not just that one prominent researcher faked his data, but that statistical sloppiness and bad protocols may be rampant across the board.  Obviously the field needs to retrench and learn a valuable lesson here.  But the question is:  which...
Smile and the world clicks “like” with you. New research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that the degree to which people smile for their Facebook photo is a good predictor of long-term well-being.  The researchers examined the Facebook profile photos of incoming freshmen, and had them fill out...