It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Benjamin Wachs

Okay, America, what’s our problem? According to a recent article in the Atlantic, “More Americans Suffer From Mental Disorders Than Anyone Else.”  Check out these sobering statistics: “Over a 12-month period, 27 percent of adults in the U.S. will experience some sort of mental health disorder, making the U.S. the...
Questions about work are ubiquitous in Western culture because in many ways we equate “work” with “self.”  We don’t ask children “who do you want to be when you grow up?” we ask them “what do you want to do when you grow up?”  Similarly, when we first meet someone we are more likely...
From crushing unemployment to multiple global conflicts – 2011 is a year that desperately needs a psychology that helps people tap their inner reserves and find their sense of purpose.  Yet too often academic psychology seems to have set everything human about humanity in its crosshairs.  Evolutionary Psychology tries to tell us...
The problem with psychology is that it doesn’t keep up with the latest fads.  That was the conclusion of a panel discussion covered by the APA Monitor.  Recommendations for the future of psychology included the inevitable “pay more attention to key markets,” “embrace technology” like Twitter (maybe you...
Immortality
America’s obsession with health can easily be seen as a fear of death – but is also a sign that we’re forgetting how to live? The intriguing premise of an essay by English professor Mark Edmundson is that health consciousness can be the flip side of nihilism – what one does when nothing matters.  Because, Edmundson...
King Solomon in old age
The first American baby boomer reached retirement age this year.  By 2030, one-in-five Americans will be a Boomer past 65.  This "silver tsunami" as it's been called, will carry much of what we know about American culture with it:  when one-in-five people are over 65, our economy is just one aspect of society that will...
Four Horseman of the Apocalypse
 In response to several studies showing that empathy has declined significantly among the young, and that social media is correlated with narcissism, a new group of educators are hoping to counter the trend by teaching empathy in college classes.  Previous research, some by Saybrook University’s Joel Federman, has shown this...
Munch's classic painting "The Scream"
In 2009 a major study (pdf) showed that women were increasingly unhappy in the modern world – and a host of pundits, psychologists, and sociologists asked “What’s happened to the fairer sex?” Was it feminism that was making women less happy? Economic inequality? Higher expectations? Loneliness? Feminism? (That one came up a...
Don Quixote (Woodcut by Gustave Dore)
In an extraordinary article in Poetry Magazine, poet Joshua Mehigan examines the popular link between “poetry” and “madness.”  After all, aren’t poets visionaries and eccentrics?  Aren’t they taken over by the muse and privy to the depths of the human experience? Well, maybe those last two.  But...
A must-read article at Mother Jones describes the existential condition of the new global workers: college educated Indian call center employees. Never before in history have people lived and worked the way they do. Because call center companies don’t trust India’s infrastructure, they operate in walled cities of their own (...
Shortly after becoming an existential therapist, Bob Edelstein remembers having a conversation with Rollo May. “I asked if one could be both existential and spiritual.  He responded that it was essential to be both.” Edelstein recounts that story in his recent review of Kirk Schneider’s book Awakening to Awe, and it...
The Existential perspective in life (and psychology) used to be tremendously … well, one hates to use the word “popular,” but there it is … in this country. Then something changed, and seemingly almost overnight it moved from being near the center of intellectual life to the balcony. What happened? Yes, there was...