It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

Categories

Posts tagged with the category Jason Dias

We can look at the self as a divided self.  Studies of people with split brains show how easy this is; when the corpus callosum is severed, each half of the brain acts as sort of an individual human.  You can even remove an entire hemisphere and be left with a functional person. There are many ways of dividing the brain and mind. ...
What is the sound of one hand clapping? This is the stereotyped question that keys us into a contemplative process.  Zen teachers use such paradoxical questions to lead students into contemplative states in which it is possible to become comfortable with ambiguity.  Reflecting on things that are logically impossible opens up the mind to...
Integration is better than segregation. This is an American value.  We need to use the same schools, the same community resources, the same places.  We need access to the same materials, literature, and social standing.  The civil rights movement showed us that this is true.  And years working with developmentally disabled...
One can describe existential psychology as a psychology of liberation – indeed, Schneider and May described it in this manner frequently, and Van Kaam’s work on the ethics of therapy takes a very similar stance.  I will not seek to contradict this stance here.  Underlying freedom, however, might it be that we will find...
We were sitting in a cramped, cold classroom in Chengdu in western China, struggling to be of use, when one of our Chinese hosts said, “Psychology is dogshit.” Each year, a small group of students and professors of psychology visit China to talk about psychology and religion, existential psychology, and Chinese indigenous psychologies...