It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Sarah Kass

Existential philosophy, and by extension, existential psychology, puts a tremendous emphasis on the interrelatedness of human beings. None of us operates in a vacuum. What we do, or do not do, has consequences on the world around us. None of this is news. Earlier this week, I attended a Café Columbia evening, which is where members of the faculty...
Photo by Mark Wolfe.
I hate standing on lines. There are very few things for which I will actually wait. Years back, I waited on line in book store to meet Jimmy Stewart, that great icon of American cinema. I wait on line to get a good seat for my bus trips. I once waited on line for 60 hours for U2 tickets but that experience spoiled the show. The band could never...
Photo by Gideon
Maurice Friedman passed away on September 25, 2012. For those who are not familiar with his work, Friedman may be best known for his many translations of the works of Martin Buber—the first to bring the philosopher’s ideas to an English-speaking audience—as well as his three-volume biography of Buber. Friedman has also written a great deal on...
Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor. Photo by Steve Jurvetson.
Where does inspiration come from? Sometimes I find myself trolling through books and articles, looking for a line or a thought that inspires me to action, whether that action is writing or performing a difficult task or simply getting up in the morning. But it is rare that in the act of actively “looking” for inspiration through words that I...
Unless you have been living under a rock during the last two weeks or live in a country that does not find U.S. news an addictively bad soap opera, you are well-aware of the political battle regarding “facts” and “truth.” In a New York Times op-ed piece last week, Charles Blow said, “Honesty is a lost art. Facts are for losers. The truth is dead....
Last week, I took my nine-year-old nephew to see the movie Paranorman, a film describing the adventures of young kid, often picked on by the school bullies, who is called to save the town from both zombies and a witch—actually a young girl, also an outcast, who was mistakenly burned as a witch hundreds of years earlier. The film was good enough,...
I have a confession to make. I am occasionally prone to outbursts of anger. Now some of you may be shocked and appalled, while others of you share my pain, and still others might say that’s no big deal—depending on your personal experiences with anger and rage. I would be much more accepting of my anger if I felt it was actually productive and...
In July 2012, Kirk Schneider gave a presentation in Brooklyn, NY, on creating a toolkit for cultivating experiences of awe. The presentation stemmed from two of his books,
In the light of massive tragedies, such as last Friday morning’s terrible shooting spree in Aurora, CO, leaving 12 dead and another 58 wounded, we are always asking, “Why?” Why did this happen? Why did he do it? Why in this way at this time? The accused shooter, James Holmes, appeared in court today, with bright orange hair and said nothing. The...
Photo by Petar Milošević
Among the top stories in the New York City area during the past two weeks has been the tragic death of a 12-year-old boy who was sent home from the emergency room with a fever and and rapid heart rate before his blood tests came back revealing a bacterial infection—sepsis—that killed him three days later. This was all following a cut the boy,...
Tim Kreider’s (2012) recent article in The New York Times’s Opinionator section entitled “The Busy Trap” really struck a chord with me. Not so much because I am juggling a lot of different projects at the moment, but rather because I heard the voices of so many people with whom I come into contact these days. I have come to truly despise the...
The word “community,” and the phrases “building community” or “creating community” are constantly bandied about in our 21st century Western life, but this “community” often feels very different from our forebearers’ notion. In the past, and even now, in some places, community existed within the clearly defined boundaries of physical or...