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Phenomenological Philosophy and Psychology in Dialogue

Posted on 25 Sep | 2 comments
Paper cutting by Bettina von Arnim.
Paper cutting by Bettina von Arnim.

Saybrook faculty members Drs. Magnus Englander, Susi Ferrarello, and Marc Applebaum collaborated in presenting a panel, "Phenomenological Research: Philosophy and Psychology in Dialogue" at the 32nd annual International Human Science Research Conference in Aalborg, Denmark in August 2013.

Englander's presented his reflections as a qualitative psychological researcher on philosophical proposals to phenomenologically "frontload" empirical experiments. He specifically addressed the work of two philosophers, Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, and their philosophical engagements with empirical science, and considered the ways in which qualitative science has been left out of the conversation. He explored Amedeo Giorgi's writings about the limitations of experimental psychology, and explored the implications of the idea of "naturalizing phenomenology."

Ferrarello's talk addressed Edmund Husserl's understanding of validity in the sciences, drawing on Husserl's Ideas volumes I-III. She addressed the meaning of the eidos in the context of the sciences,"regional ontologies" in Husserl's thought, and the overall relationship of the empirical sciences to eidetic science, addressing the comparison of "experiencing intuition" and "eidetic intuition" in Husserlian phenomenology.

Applebaum's talk—summarized in the slides posted below—was a reflection on the relationship between phenomenological philosophy and phenomenological psychology through the lens of Aristotle's discussion of the relationship of sophia to phronesis in the Nichomachean Ethics.

-- Marc Applebaum

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Comments and Discussions

Excellent. These are

Excellent. These are important conversations that will impact the future of psychological theory, research, and practice.

Yes, phronesis and

Yes, phronesis and personology!: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/feeling-relating-existing/201206/scientism-in-psychotherapy

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