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The Future Is Now

Posted on 18 Nov | 0 comments
Illustration by Ernst Lübbert.
Illustration by Ernst Lübbert.

During the past year, The New Existentialists featured a series of articles focusing on the future of existential psychology. But key to the growth of this third force in psychology is youth.

In a new essay now available to the New Existentialists' library, Shawn Rubin details the events from the HECTOR project—Humanistic Existential Constructivist Transpersonal Organizing Retreat—and the Fourth Annual Society for Humanistic Psychology Conference in 2011, where the focus was on supporting the students and early career psychologists in existential-humanistic psychology as the future of our field.

Rubin discusses the necessity of increasing research and scholarship in existential-humanistic psychology, as well as bringing E-H psychology into the public discourse. This may be through supporting E-H friendly internships, increasing community activism using E-H principles, and/or fostering larger national and international E-H dialogue.

In this essay, Rubin also notes some of the highlights of the Society for Humanistic Psychology's Fourth Annual Conference, which featured keynote addresses by David Elkins, Maureen O'Hara, Ernesto Spinelli, and Voyce Hendrix, the original director of Soteria House.

To learn more about where existential-humanistic psychology has been and where it is going, download the article below—or browse other papers in our library.

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The Future Is Now

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