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Rethinking Complexity

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Posts tagged with the category Government

Photo provided by Kerubo Abuya
Today the world celebrates the International Day of Human Rights, and lately I have been reflecting on conversations that I have been engaged in where the topics of leadership, human rights, and activism become points of curiosity for me. In late November, I attended the fourth annual African Women and Political Leadership conference in Lilongwe,...
Photo courtesy of TheFiscalTimes.com
Who among us is not experiencing frustration with the nature of the debate about the future of our government tax system? Our tax, pensions, as well as the health of our whole economy hang in the balance, and we see a duel of extreme and simplistic statements about “job creators,” “becoming another Greece (or Europe),”...
Photo by Wernher Krutein, Corbis.
The difficulties around healthcare in the U.S. remain as complex as ever. I have spent the last two months experiencing those in a very personal way. Twenty-two years ago, a close family member—let’s call her Millie—was diagnosed with cancer and given a poor prognosis.  She beat the odds and survived. This summer, she was...
Photo courtesy of Philly.com
As I turned on the TV yesterday evening to watch the election results, I didn’t know what to expect. The polls were too close to give a confident advantage to either candidate and, given recent history, it was plausible that either candidate could have won. Reflecting on what emerged during the evening, I began thinking about what we could...
Image courtesy of TheDailyStar.net
In the presidential campaign, I have been struck by how much the dialogue is about what people are “for” and how little we talk about how to do what we want. As if being “for” the right things led to a clear path to success. Indeed, our president is faulted for proposing the right ideas and making promises, but not being...
Photo courtesy of TheDailyBeast.com
For some time now, I've been on a diet. Not a food diet, a news diet. I've made a conscious decision to purposely stay away from all the CNNs, CBSs, ABCs, NBCs, FOXs, and any other local stations or cable networks peddling news on the small screen as much as possible. As a former print journalist and recovering news junkie, abstaining from...
Photo courtesy of OregonLive.com
The belief that government must continue to be structured and must function in 2012 as it has in the past is a myth. There is much that public sector leaders can do to change their organizational culture, improve the quality of services they deliver, and become more efficient stewards of the public’s money. I would argue that one of the...
A mid-August posting by Jeff Selingo, editorial director of The Chronicle of Higher Education, described three key issues facing administrators in higher education in the U.S. What he referred to as the "trifecta" that had to be kept in balance involved "rising tuition discount rates, flat or falling net tuition revenue, and...
By Malwack (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3
With the coming of another U.S. presidential election, we are faced once again with a barrage of over-simplified explanations about increasingly complex problems. And with the choice of Paul Ryan as the vice presidential candidate for the Republican Party, it seems that healthcare will be front-and-center in the ads and speeches. He obviously didn...
Last Friday, it was impossible to tune in into any news station and not be completely drawn into the details surrounding the massacre in Aurora, Colorado. A gunman had killed 12 people and wounded 58 others at the midnight premiere of the latest Batman movie installment. Pundits, politicians, and the rest of us immediately after learning about the...
Photo by Anna Ridout/ Oxfam
As I listened to the afternoon newscast on my way home a few weeks ago, I thought I had misunderstood what the broadcaster said on a story about a "Save the Children" report that childbirth is the number one killer of teenage girls in Africa between the ages of 15 and 19. I was further shocked when the broadcaster said that this trend is...
The other day, National Public Radio published a story about partisan politics. According to insights offered by Dartmouth College political scientist Brendan Nyhan in the story, partisans tend to be partial to their political loyalties on a range of issues, side-stepping the facts. When remaining loyal requires them to change their views of the...