Logo for Saybrook University

Rethinking Complexity

Categories

Posts tagged with the category Government

This is not a book review. It is more like a question that I put out to all who read this. I think it is an important question, because it addresses the Saybrook OS PhD enterprise, as well as our roles and relationships with the world in which we live. The question is prompted by an essay/book review that I am writing for Integral Leadership...
In his March 11th 2013 article “Female candidates faced big obstacles in concluded polls” in the Standard Digital, Michael Wesonga asserted that “Kenyan women stand out as the greatest losers in the just concluded General Election after they failed to clinch top seats. No woman was elected as governor or to the Senate”. He...
Photo courtesy of snid.eu
My wife Katherine, who teaches preschool, overheard the following question raised by a 4-year-old during lunch last week, “Does your mommy let you download apps?” During the rest of the conversation, the 4 and 5-year-olds compared technology access policies in their homes. On a separate occasion, Katherine told me about a student who...
I’m afraid that our efforts to understand and define leadership, its styles and types and characteristics, have not resulted in effective responses to the complex challenges we’ve created for ourselves. The field of leadership development not delivering on a central aspect of leadership—results—is a bit ironic, really. So I...
Photo courtesy of NYDailyNews.com
Having the flu gave me the opportunity to watch U.S. President Barack Obama’s inaugural ceremonies on Monday. As I watched, I wondered if I was observing an event that will help foster a new United States of America—an America that is inclusive of all people and enriched by an empowered citizenry.  Obama’s speech was a clear...
Photo provided by Kerubo Abuya
Today the world celebrates the International Day of Human Rights, and lately I have been reflecting on conversations that I have been engaged in where the topics of leadership, human rights, and activism become points of curiosity for me. In late November, I attended the fourth annual African Women and Political Leadership conference in Lilongwe,...
Photo courtesy of TheFiscalTimes.com
Who among us is not experiencing frustration with the nature of the debate about the future of our government tax system? Our tax, pensions, as well as the health of our whole economy hang in the balance, and we see a duel of extreme and simplistic statements about “job creators,” “becoming another Greece (or Europe),”...
Photo by Wernher Krutein, Corbis.
The difficulties around healthcare in the U.S. remain as complex as ever. I have spent the last two months experiencing those in a very personal way. Twenty-two years ago, a close family member—let’s call her Millie—was diagnosed with cancer and given a poor prognosis.  She beat the odds and survived. This summer, she was...
Photo courtesy of Philly.com
As I turned on the TV yesterday evening to watch the election results, I didn’t know what to expect. The polls were too close to give a confident advantage to either candidate and, given recent history, it was plausible that either candidate could have won. Reflecting on what emerged during the evening, I began thinking about what we could...
Image courtesy of TheDailyStar.net
In the presidential campaign, I have been struck by how much the dialogue is about what people are “for” and how little we talk about how to do what we want. As if being “for” the right things led to a clear path to success. Indeed, our president is faulted for proposing the right ideas and making promises, but not being...
Photo courtesy of TheDailyBeast.com
For some time now, I've been on a diet. Not a food diet, a news diet. I've made a conscious decision to purposely stay away from all the CNNs, CBSs, ABCs, NBCs, FOXs, and any other local stations or cable networks peddling news on the small screen as much as possible. As a former print journalist and recovering news junkie, abstaining from...
Photo courtesy of OregonLive.com
The belief that government must continue to be structured and must function in 2012 as it has in the past is a myth. There is much that public sector leaders can do to change their organizational culture, improve the quality of services they deliver, and become more efficient stewards of the public’s money. I would argue that one of the...