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Rethinking Complexity

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Posts tagged with the category Self and the Other

Mindfulness has many benefits for brain functioning and better brain functioning equals better leadership. Here are five ways mindful leadership benefits organizational results. 1. Mindful leaders are less reactive. Being less reactive enables the frontal lobes to go into action, which equates to better analysis and better decisions. Better...
By Dedda71 (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)],
Everything I read points to the need for attention for our brains to develop new neurons and synapses, and I've been wondering about awareness and attention. Mindfulness practice is an awareness and attention practice where we build our capacity to pay attention by stopping our activity and focusing on our direct and immediate experience. We...
As a systems thinker and practitioner, the question of boundaries has always fascinated me. Which boundaries are real and which ones are humanly constructed? Which boundaries are helpful and which ones need to expand to include more? Where is the boundary of our socially constructed world and how does it interface with the natural world? Where do...
Rare is the time to chat in our workday, don’t you think? The other day I sat with Brian, my organization’s director of educational services, and Kelly, our enrollment coordinator. We engaged in something unusual: a casual, unstructured conversation in the workplace. The topic was something particularly jazzy to those of you born to...
Everything I read points to the need for attention for our brains to develop new neurons and synapses, and I've been wondering about awareness and attention. Mindfulness practice is an awareness and attention practice where we build our capacity to pay attention by stopping our activity and focusing on our direct and immediate experience. We...
My latest inquiry surrounds the exploration of the widespread belief that "knowledge is power." I am teaching a dialogue course this term and one of my students inspired this inquiry through a posting that enlightened my perspective on how limiting that assumption that "knowledge is power" can be. Dialogue asks us to explore...
Photo courtesy of "The Defence Coach" on Facebook.
The March 28th edition of New York Times magazine had a deeply inspiring article about some unique programs being adopted by the U.S. Army to help returning war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Instead of medical treatment and therapy, the programs focus on activating a natural capacity of the human being for growth, learning, and...
Image courtesy of Nonformality.org
I’ve learned some new things about inquiry recently. I’ve been working with inquiry for some time and I love learning new ways of practicing. The three things I learned came from my research in neuroscience. I have been reading Allan Schore’s 1994 book, Affect Regulation and the Origin of the Self: The Neurobiology of Emotional...
Carl Rogers
Individuals create social societies wherever they go, according to several organizational theorists of the late 19th and early 20th century. Douglas McGregor, for instance, created his ABC theory regarding attitude, behavior, and consequences to illustrate the importance of the individual within working groups and the effect upon successful output...
Photo by Christian Poveda
I live a peaceful life running a small business from my home in Reno, Nevada. My work requires travel and offers me the good fortune of working with international leaders to help them improve their collaboration and communication. Life’s pretty good and the organizational world that I am immersed in has challenges of growth, revenue...
Why do we all seem to be begging to belong today? Kids beg for iPhones. Connecting via text is still connecting. Just ask anyone. Striking a balance between being alone and being part of a group—a team, a club, or an organization—seems to be the seesaw of life. Rollo May once wrote, "Loneliness is such an omnipotent and painful...
I am teaching a course on generative and strategic dialogue this term and, through the amazing dialogue with my students, I am reminded of the importance and challenge of this communicative practice. Dialogue asks us to become more aware and intentional about how we listen, think, and speak. In his 1999 book, Dialogue and the Art of Thinking...