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Rethinking Complexity

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Posts tagged with the category Nancy Southern

Recently I travelled to Finland for a conference which created an opportunity to travel around the Scandinavian countries. The country that left the strongest impression was Sweden.  We took the ferry from Vassa Finland to Umea Sweden and as soon as we got on the ferry, I noticed something different in the way Swedish people interact with...
This month I travelled to Finland for a conference on Culture, Values, and Justice.  An interesting group of scholars attended who were exploring the many aspects, interrelationships, and applications of ideas that comprise these three areas.  To me, these three subjects and their interrelationships suggest three questions that define...
Many of today’s complexity-related challenges require leaders to create more space in the workplace for people to share their difficulties and concerns, and explore new ways of addressing them. Whenever we are facing the unknown, doing something we haven’t done before, and unsure how to approach a new challenge or what the outcome...
Recently I had the opportunity to visit and experience the work being done as part of the Las Vegas  Downtown Project.  It is a $350M project with a mission to “ transform Las Vegas into the most community-focused large city in the world”.   They are working on that mission actively through the purchase of real...
Last week I attended the 15th Annual International Leadership Association Global Conference in Montreal. The conference theme was Leadership for Local and Global Resilience, recognizing the need for leaders to innovate and lead sustainable change in our local and global communities and organizations. This academic conference brought together...
Our Oct 3 blog post by Gary Metcalf announced Saybrook’s plans to offer a new certificate program in Crisis Management, based on the important work of Ian Mitroff. Mitroff is a systems guy, someone who understands that planning, preparing, and responding to the crises we are experiencing today need a new approach. Angie’s list recently...
We struggle in organizations to clarify objectives and future directions. We are working in complex adaptive systems that are ever changing and uncertain, and our ability to foresee the future, establish goals, and work toward them in a linear way, is difficult, if not impossible, in organizations today. At the same time the challenges before us...
Marc W.F. Meurrens (59), with Nils (6 m), at home office, nov. 2004 {{GFDL}} Cat
The decision made by the CEO of Yahoo to order all employees working virtually back into the office was an unfortunate indication of how little we have learned about working in a virtual world. Sad, given that people have been doing this for over a half century. I was fortunate to work for a company in the 1970s that was progressive on flexible...
It seems that many of the conversations I am engaged in these days focus on the need for organizations to collaborate. When I first started working in the area of collaboration, the focus was on creating cultures in organizations that supported people in collaborating across their often siloed functional structures.  Maybe that was the...
Image courtesy of ProfessionalTechIntegration.com
As awareness grows that we are living in a world, not just made up by parts, but by complex systems, the desire to develop a systems perspective is growing. I am co-presenting at a conference of social workers this week, helping them understand how poverty is a systemic issue and how approaches to solving it must also be systemic. Fortunately, the...
Photo courtesy of NYDailyNews.com
Having the flu gave me the opportunity to watch U.S. President Barack Obama’s inaugural ceremonies on Monday. As I watched, I wondered if I was observing an event that will help foster a new United States of America—an America that is inclusive of all people and enriched by an empowered citizenry.  Obama’s speech was a clear...
Photo courtesy of Philly.com
As I turned on the TV yesterday evening to watch the election results, I didn’t know what to expect. The polls were too close to give a confident advantage to either candidate and, given recent history, it was plausible that either candidate could have won. Reflecting on what emerged during the evening, I began thinking about what we could...