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I remember covering the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life in April 2003. Well, sort of. I was four months into my internship with The Miami Herald at the time covering the civic beat in the town of Miami Lakes, a suburb about 30 minutes northwest of Miami. I landed that intership after stringing for the newspaper for more than a year while I finished my undergraduate degree in journalism. Despite the time I had already put in writing community news at the Herald, I was still very green and very wet around the ears. After four months...
Photo courtesy of Visual Photos.
I've been impressed with the rich blog entries that have led up to this one. My colleagues have offered some wonderful insights about how we relate to our work, our communities, our family, and ourselves. In overgeneralized terms, the entries touch on how we show up as social beings and maintain our authentic self. This entry adds another dimension. By intention, it’s a simple post meant to merely inspire a reunion to oneself through nature and invoke inquiry. This is the time of year when our neighbors are typically clamoring to get...
Photo courtesy of ConstructionWeekOnline.com
It's Monday and you wake up without an alarm clock, looking forward to your day at the office—you love what you do and you love the people with whom you work. You are a member of a community: trust, mutual support, open communication, and friendships sustain your whole self as much as the income you receive from your job. Just a dream? It might seem that way, but it's not. In fact, this idyllic scenario isn't quite as out of reach as you might think. Russell Ackoff observed that "the principal obstructions to corporate...
Ever wonder what the essence of being you is while you're at work? Ever wonder why you feel constrained at work as if the real you's buried a bit? Chances are you are not alone. The camouflaging of self appears to be part of the reason why today's executives and office workers feel like they're gasping for air in the organizational chamber. So how and why do we put on the veil that hides the true self at work? After all, we are not living in the 1960s, Mad Men-era. Our roles today are dynamic, not static. Work-role rigidity...
One of the most compelling qualities of our brains and minds is that we are designed to be social beings. Our brains are designed for relationship because they form through relationships while our neural networks and patterns of thought grow and change as we relate and respond to the people in our lives. We also develop in relationship with the world around us—with the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, and the earth we live on. The earth may or may not depend upon us to survive, but the survival of the human race is...

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