Saybrook’s approach sets itself apart from other leadership programs in employing a systems approach with real-world issues and real-time practice. Practicum integrates academic learning with practical experience, calling on all aspects of curriculum to design, deploy, and evaluate a specific solution while leading a team.

This master’s in Leadership and Management program is an 18‐month, lockstep cohort program intended to be completed in four consecutive semesters (including summer sessions)—earning 36 credits to graduate. Graduates of this program will have developed interpersonal and critical thinking skills essential for today’s leaders—enhancing the opportunity to advance their careers as managers and leaders in for-profit, nonprofit, or governmental organizations.

Embody real-world practices that mobilize corporations, governments, and nonprofits to thrive.

M.A. in Leadership and Management: Executive and Civic Leader Specialization Sample Courses

Conflicting and Corroborating Models of Adaptive Leadership
Leaders of change in organizations and in a community need a wide range of tools to address diverse environments and challenges. This specialization course for the Executive and Community Leadership program brings focus to how the tools of Distributed Adaptive Leadership mesh with other management and leadership models. Participants in this course will learn to assess dynamic systems and determine the appropriate leadership models to apply, and analyze the effects and efficacy of those models.

Thrival for Distributed Adaptive Leadership
In the context of the Executive and Civic Leadership Specialization, “thrival” is held in contrast to “survival.” The VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous) nature of the environments in which leaders, teams, enterprises, and communities of interest frequently operate tends to increase stress and degrade performance. Participants in this specialization course learn individual and collective practices for nurturing self-awareness and vital emotional/relational engagement through taking responsibility for personal safety, the inclusion of multiple perspectives, management of triggers and hungers; and clarity of values and purpose.

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