Mark Yang

Mark

Yang

Mark Yang

Adjunct Faculty

Department
CSS Humanistic and Clinical Psychology
Institution
Saybrook University
Email
Biography

Mark C. Yang, PsyD is an American licensed clinical psychologist and co-founder and director of the International Institute of Existential-Humanistic Psychology (http://www.iiehp.org), whose mission is to promote Humanistic-Existential Psychology and provide counseling skills training to mental health professionals in Asia. Dr. Yang is also an adjunct professor, the director of the Existential-Humanistic Programs in Asia, and the Co-Director of the International Psychology Certificate Program at Saybrook University (www.saybrook.edu). Dr. Yang is actively involved in the training and supervision of psychology students from the Humanistic-Existential Perspective throughout Asia. Dr. Yang's professional interests include: Existential Psychology, Individual and Group Psychotherapy, Grief and Bereavement Counseling, Legal and Ethical Issues in Clinical Practice, and Cross-Cultural Psychology. Dr. Yang was born in Taiwan and immigrated with his family to the United States when he was nine years old. Dr. Yang embraces the fact that he is a dog lover and laments the fact that he is unable to properly raise a dog here in Asia.

Education History
Degree Institution Year
B.A. University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 1988
PsyD Fuller Theological Seminar, Graduate School of Psychology, Pasadena, CA 1994
Curriculum Vitae
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Research

The Relationship Between Shame and Intimacy Across Ethnic Groups

Neuropsychological Outcome: Bilateral Fetal Lateral Eminence Transplantation in Huntington’s Disease.

Neuropsychological functioning following fetal striatal transplantation in Huntington’s chorea.

An Existential/Zhi Mian Approach to International Psychology.

International Dialogues in China: Advancing Existential Therapy Practice.

Professional Skills
Existential-Humanistic Psychology, Taoist Psychology, Group Psychotherapy, Death and Dying, Grief and Bereavement, International Psychology