It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Death

Last week a strange thing happened on Facebook. I had a request for a friend to be tagged on an old picture in Facebook. I knew this friend was not on my list of friends, and had not been on Facebook for a long time. I had called but her number was out of order. Her picture was one I had posted a while ago when I discovered it, so I approved the...
Autism and small babies were never considered before creating the weekly practice of sitting quietly to pray in church. You can tell today, Palm Sunday, is one of the year’s longest by the volume and activity level of children under the age of five as the time exceeds the one hour mark. I sat in church, straining to hear the music and the...
Illustration by Nevit Dilmen.
My husband told me a story of a girl he spoke to in a chatroom. He was in Ireland and she was in America. She was 15 and very upset about her parent’s divorce. While chatting, she disclosed she was going to end her life. My husband, being a big-hearted sort of person, did not take this lightly. He knew how much it hurt to lose a friend to...
Photo by Lanaré Sévi.
Listening to the Gospel Sunday was a difficult experience. I had an adolescent girl on hormones. Concentration was made more challenging when my pubescent daughter began crying because her socks did not match her dress. Unlike Jesus, my daughter does not wear white, as it becomes an invitation for her clothes to be used as a canvas with chocolate...
Just in case you value such things, spoiler alert. Although what I have to say shouldn't actually come as much of a surprise. Seeking a Friend for the End of the World is an end-of-the-world movie in which the world actually ends. There are actually a number of complicated love stories in this romantic comedy about the end of times. In the...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. The New York Times article "When Grief Won’t Relent" discusses the difference between typical grief from the loss of a loved one and when it crosses...
Photo by Erik Charlton.
Today’s The New York Times bore out some sad news, at least to me. Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and author of Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, announced he has terminal liver cancer (Sacks, 2015). In his announcement, he followed the lead of his favorite philosopher, David Hume, in the examination of his life. Even in...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. It’s the time of year for parties and buffets, and overindulging in nibbly bites. Well, this week we bring to you the kind of smorgasbord that doesn’t put...
Photo by CEphoto, Uwe Aranas.
When I teach my Psych 101 and MCAT Psych/Soc students about the concept of social stigmas, often they are surprised to hear that it still exists in this country around the idea of seeking help for mental distress. Maybe it’s because I teach in urban settings or maybe because students applying to medical schools come in with a certain sense...
As we head into the thick of the holiday season, we don’t have to look far or hard to pithy sayings invoking positivity and goodness, or stories with lots of happy endings. Tis shortly the season for the half full cup to runneth over. Don’t you dare rain on my parade! We Americans, especially, love a good, happy ending! Where the boy...
Photo by Christopher Michel.
EDITOR'S NOTE: This post was written a few weeks before Scooby Doo aka Escobar Durango's passing. My dog is dying. Right there in front of me, inch by inch at first and now yard by yard, my dog is dying. He's 14 or 15, nobody can be sure because he came from the pound way back when. The pound named him Mick and I named him Scooby Doo...
Photo by Don Scarborough.
Sometimes, I want to shout at my son. I mean, I don't want to, but I experience a powerful urge to. But he's nine, and shouting at him wouldn't be helpful. It would damage the relationship and teach bullying. When this urge arises, sometimes, I take a page out of Carl Whitaker's book: I pretend to shout, mocking the angry man,...