It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Education

Photo by Michele Campeotto.
This week, I took my orals for advancement to candidacy at Saybrook. It seems like light years from that first residential conference when I met the Saybrook elite and fell in love with the Humanistic-Existential practice of psychology. It was a struggle, but a good struggle. It wasn’t a fair fight. They loaded the bases with the likes of...
A synagogue burning on Kristallnacht, 1938.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Anti-Semitism is rearing its ugly head in Europe again, and it is reaching levels that parallel to 1930’s Europe. The reasons may be less obvious than one thinks...
Photo by Libi Fishman.
As a child, I drove my parents crazy with my constant stream of questions. “Why? What if? How come?” I know my friends with kids can relate to the exhausting process of fielding random questions with convincing enough answers. At times, it must be easier to ask for some quiet time and answer with “Because I said so.” I woke...
Photo by Marion S. Trikosko.
I recently took my son to see Selma. There was no school because of the weather, so it seemed like a history lesson was in order. Oyelowo was brilliant as Martin Luther King, Jr.. A sensitive performance, nuanced. Fear in his eyes at just the right moment, to just the right degree. Not a film for the faint-hearted, at times brutal and shocking. My...
Photo from Seattle Municipal Archives.
I am in an abusive relationship. It's hard to spot. Nobody in my house is hitting anybody or neglecting anyone, or shouting, insulting, degrading. In fact, the abusive relationship does not involve my family at all, except as codependents. What I'm addicted to is money, and my family can't live with me unless I have some. And the...
Photo by KUHT.
I loved Mr. Rogers as a kid—that avuncular, kindly, gently humorous man who could instill in me a desire to learn and become involved in civic endeavors better than any of my childhood teachers could. Now, with Fred Rogers shining in my memory, I work as a professor and a therapist. In the classroom, I strive to be spontaneous, creative, and...
Last year, I was teaching a section of Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy and discussing with my students the topic of mysticism and personal experiences of the “sacred,” which I loosely define as that which is associated with authentic perception of beauty, feelings of awe, and the dawning of wordless profound wisdom that enriches...
Photo by Jacek Nowacki.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. From the files this week are several articles that may feel old in some ways but are actually new takes on old familiar themes. Sometimes, it is refreshing to see an...
Birdman. Michael Keaton, some other people you might have heard of. The trailers make it look really interesting, the story of a washed-up superhero who was never more than second-rate being dragged out of retirement by popular demand. That could be funny. Only that has nothing whatsoever with the movie. It's really about a washed-up actor...
Last night, I taught my first ever psychology/sociology class to MCAT students. As many of you probably do not know, the MCAT—the Medical College Admissions Test—is adding for 2015 a brand new content section on psychology and sociology in which they expect incoming medical students to have taken at least one semester of introductory...
Math is not my subject. In high school, my average in math was lowest, although surprisingly, my highest average was in the sciences. I “got” physics, in spite of the math, because there, the math made sense. In the abstract, it sent my brain reeling. More than once, my mother had to call my math teachers to say that I was too sick...
Photo by David Shankbone.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. The end of the summer is almost upon us and that back-to-school feeling is in the air, much to the chagrin of students (and teachers?) everywhere. Thus, in honor of...