It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Posts tagged with the category Key Concepts

Photo by Marion S. Trikosko.
I recently took my son to see Selma. There was no school because of the weather, so it seemed like a history lesson was in order. Oyelowo was brilliant as Martin Luther King, Jr.. A sensitive performance, nuanced. Fear in his eyes at just the right moment, to just the right degree. Not a film for the faint-hearted, at times brutal and shocking. My...
Judith Zausner
I could introduce this book by telling you it was written by a dear friend, I know some of the individuals interviewed, and I wrote the Forward—but I’d rather tell you it is inspiring reading for anyone who is interested in aging, creativity, and self-expression. A central theme of Judith Zausner’s career has been creativity. Her...
Gordon Willard Allport combined methodological, theoretical, and pedagogical approaches: rigorous experimental and quantitative research and qualitative means of data collection and analysis. Allport’s interest in the entire life and the whole personality marked the historical emergence of the narrative approach in psychology (Allport, 1942...
The world is changing. If you want to survive in the modern world, you have to be leaner, sharper, colder. You have to cut back on love and empathy and focus more on the bottom line. Don't get me wrong: I love your idealism. I just think you need to be more realistic. Look, so you've got this great mission and all, but look at it this way...
Photo by Shayan Sanyal.
Writing in the Pacific Standard, Jerry Adler suggests that research psychology—like most branches of experimental science right now—is facing a crisis. Poorly proofed journals, unreproducible results, questionable statistical models … It leads him to ask the headlining question: “Can Social Scientists Save Themselves?...
Mr. Bill and Georgia.
This weekend, I attended the funeral for a wonderful man I knew as “Mr. Bill.” I work as a therapeutic riding instructor teaching kids with emotional, cognitive, and physical challenges the art of horseback riding. The program is supported by an army of volunteers who dedicate their time and energy into ensuring that the horses are...
Nine years ago tonight, almost to the minute that I am writing this, I was rushed to the hospital in screaming amounts of pain. You see, I had had a migraine at that point for about two days, but I knew all day long that something was very different. I had a set regimen of medications and alternative remedies that I would always use to at least...
Photo by Moise Nicu.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Less than two weeks into 2015, tragedy is already dominating the world landscape. But really, some of the tragedies we speak of began even earlier, as the pain of 2014...
The changing of the calendar year does not inspire me to celebrate. My “new year” comes at the end of autumn, as the trees—at the height of their high def beauty—drop their leaves and turn inward, surrendering to the growing darkness with a faith and grace I rarely muster. I reflected on my year back in October; I liked...
“If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.” The above phrase has become a rallying cry of activists of all sorts. Of late, I’ve seen it on the newsfeeds of many Facebook friends—real friends—who have been active in the protests in New York City. But I have a real problem with this rallying cry...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. Happy 2015! Only two days into the new year and some of us are still considering what resolutions to make for the coming year while others have already said goodbye to...
Photo by KUHT.
I loved Mr. Rogers as a kid—that avuncular, kindly, gently humorous man who could instill in me a desire to learn and become involved in civic endeavors better than any of my childhood teachers could. Now, with Fred Rogers shining in my memory, I work as a professor and a therapist. In the classroom, I strive to be spontaneous, creative, and...