It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. As today is Hallowe’en, a day that once marked the end of the harvest season one during which the veils between the living and the dead were quite thin and now seems inextricably tied to “spooky” tricks and candy corn, this week’s column will be looking at some of the oddities in the news of late. Just in case we haven’t heard enough...
This contribution is my 13th article for the New Existentialists. I have now contributed one for every lunar cycle over the past year, and I find myself in a celebratory mood as I reflect back over the past year of contributions. It is also fitting that I write this at the end of the old Celtic year, just a couple days before Samhain (Summer...
Photo by Fanny Schertzer.
Once upon a time, I remember hearing a teacher of developmental psychology say “the body is our first environment.” Indeed, it is the first place we live in and the place in which we will die. We are our body. Everything around us can change, and our bodies can also change. Still, it takes more work, and there are certainly things...
Photo by Don Scarborough.
Sometimes, I want to shout at my son. I mean, I don't want to, but I experience a powerful urge to. But he's nine, and shouting at him wouldn't be helpful. It would damage the relationship and teach bullying. When this urge arises, sometimes, I take a page out of Carl Whitaker's book: I pretend to shout, mocking the angry man,...
Courtesy Paramount Pictures.
In a recent article in The New York Times, entitled “Why Doctors Need Stories,” Peter Kramer makes the case for the use of the anecdote or vignette to fully understand a patient’s experience. Rather than relying on empirical data alone, doctors are factoring in patients’ narratives, viewing them as an important part of...
Maria Yakunchikova's "Fear" 1893-95.
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. With Hallowe’en approaching, it seems appropriate to start getting in the mood with a variety of treats, or maybe tricks, from the recent news. Recently, this...

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